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Jury Announced for 2019 Aga Khan Award for Architecture

11:00 - 5 December, 2018
Jury Announced for 2019 Aga Khan Award for Architecture, Bait Ur Rouf Mosque, Dhaka, Bangladesh / Marina Tabassum Architects. Image
Bait Ur Rouf Mosque, Dhaka, Bangladesh / Marina Tabassum Architects. Image

The Aga Khan Award for Architecture has announced the master jury for the 2017-2019 award cycle. The jury, a diverse and global group comprising architects, academics, and theorists, will select the recipients of the award, each of whom will, in turn, receive a USD $I million prize for their winning work.

Children Village by Aleph Zero and Rosenbaum Wins 2018 RIBA International Prize

04:00 - 21 November, 2018
Children Village by Aleph Zero and Rosenbaum Wins 2018 RIBA International Prize, Children Village. Image © Leonardo Finotti
Children Village. Image © Leonardo Finotti

Children Village by Brazilian architects Aleph Zero and Rosenbaum has won the 2018 RIBA International Prize. Located on the edge of the rain forest in northern Brazil, the new school complex provides accommodation for 540 children attending the Canuanã School. The RIBA International Prize is awarded every two years to a building that exemplifies design excellence and architectural ambition, and delivers meaningful social impact. Children Village was recognized for it's vision in imagining architecture as a tool for social transformation.

Children Village. Image © Leonardo Finotti Children Village. Image © Leonardo Finotti Children Village. Image © Leonardo Finotti Children Village. Image © Leonardo Finotti + 31

Thesis Works of Daniel Libeskind, Liz Diller and Others Exhibited at the Cooper Union

09:00 - 1 November, 2018
Thesis Works of Daniel Libeskind, Liz Diller and Others Exhibited at the Cooper Union, Author: Christian Dickson. Project Title: The Mark of Cain and Cain’s Mark. Course/AY: Thesis, 1991-92. Professors: John Hejduk, Roderick Knox, Sean Sculley, Regi Weile. Image Courtesy of The Irwin S. Chanin School of Architecture Archive, The Cooper Union
Author: Christian Dickson. Project Title: The Mark of Cain and Cain’s Mark. Course/AY: Thesis, 1991-92. Professors: John Hejduk, Roderick Knox, Sean Sculley, Regi Weile. Image Courtesy of The Irwin S. Chanin School of Architecture Archive, The Cooper Union

The Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art in New York has unveiled an exhibition showcasing 50 years of undergraduate architectural thesis projects by students of the Irwin S. Chanin School of Architecture.

Drawing together the works of Elizabeth Diller, Laurie Hawkinson, Daniel Libeskind, and others, the exhibition titled “Archive and Artifact: The Virtual and the Physical” presents hand-drawn, digital, and three-dimensional works.

Margaux Wheelock-Shew The Factory of Fake Autonomy: Reassembling the Social Landscape of Labor. Thesis, 2017-18. Photo by Lea Bertucci. Image Courtesy of The Irwin S. Chanin School of Architecture Archive, The Cooper Union Author: Stanley Allen. Project Title: The Theater of Production. Course/AY: Thesis, 1980-81.  Professors: John Hejduk, Raimund Abraham, Anthony Candido, Ricardo Scofidio, Robert Slutzky, Bernard Tschumi. Image Courtesy of The Irwin S. Chanin School of Architecture Archive, The Cooper Union Author: Daniel Libeskind. Project Title: Collage. Course/AY: Thesis, 1969-70. Professors: John Hejduk, Lewis Davis, Robert Slutzky, Fred Travsiano. Image Courtesy of The Irwin S. Chanin School of Architecture Archive, The Cooper Union Author: Edward Arcari. Project Title: Construction Site. Course/AY: Thesis, 1985-86. Professors: John Hejduk, Donald Wall, Regi Weile. Image Courtesy of The Irwin S. Chanin School of Architecture Archive, The Cooper Union + 13

Elizabeth Diller of Diller Scofidio + Renfro Named Again in Time's 100 Most Influential People List

04:00 - 20 April, 2018
Elizabeth Diller of Diller Scofidio + Renfro Named Again in Time's 100 Most Influential People List, The High Line in New York, one of the projects Elizabeth Diller is known for. Image © Iwan Baan
The High Line in New York, one of the projects Elizabeth Diller is known for. Image © Iwan Baan

Architect Elizabeth Diller of firm Diller Scofidio + Renfro has once again been named one of TIME’s most influential people in 2018. TIME Magazine’s annual ‘Time 100’ List recognizes the achievement of artists, leaders, activists, entrepreneurs, and athletes who are exemplary in their fields. Diller has been named to the category of “Titans,” along with Roger Federer, Oprah Winfrey, Jeff Bezos, Elon Musk and Kevin Durant. This is Diller’s second time on the list but the first time being honored as a "Titan."

Other honorees this year include Shinzo Abe, Justin Trudeau, Xi Jinping and Jimmy Kimmel. 

4 Takes on Why Sound Design Is Crucial to Good Architecture

09:30 - 10 April, 2018
reSITE's RESONATE conference was held at the MAAT Museum in Lisbon, Portugal. Image © Joel Felipe
reSITE's RESONATE conference was held at the MAAT Museum in Lisbon, Portugal. Image © Joel Felipe

What is the role of sound and acoustics in the work of leading architecture practices? In February this year, reSITE and MAAT in collaboration with Meyer Sound hosted RESONATE: Thinking Sound and Space, a conference focused exclusively on the intersection of architecture and sound.

Elizabeth Diller of Diller Scofidio + Renfro, Snøhetta's Kjetil Trædal Thorsen, Michael Jones from Foster + Partners, the founders of Meyer Sound, and the pioneer of sound art Bernhard Leitner spoke with reSITE and Canal 180 at MAAT Museum in Lisbon, Portugal. Below are the 4 episodes in the series, where they discuss the role of sound in designing cultural venues and concert halls and the changing role of the architect in an age of specialization:

Frieze Art & Architecture Conference

18:53 - 14 August, 2017
Frieze Art & Architecture Conference, The Sackler Courtyard, V&A Exhibition Road Quarter, designed by AL_A ©Hufton+Crow
The Sackler Courtyard, V&A Exhibition Road Quarter, designed by AL_A ©Hufton+Crow

What is the relationship between art and architecture? What makes a great space for art? How do buildings inform what and how we see? Leading architects will be in conversation with museum directors, gallerists and artists to discuss major international projects and the role of architecture in shaping the cultural landscape.

MoMA Completes First Phase of Renovations, Reveals Designs for Extension by Diller Scofidio + Renfro and Gensler

14:00 - 1 June, 2017

At this morning’s press event, The Museum of Modern Art in New York (MoMA) unveiled the completed renovations to the east end of its museum campus, while also revealing for the first time the full design of their multi-year expansion project designed by Diller Scofidio + Renfro in collaboration with Gensler.

With the completion of the east wing renovation, which began in February 2016, the museum has created two spacious third-floor galleries by reconfiguring 15,000 square feet of space, allowing for better flexibility in installing the collection and temporary exhibitions.

View of The Marlene Hess and James D. Zirin Lounge. Image © Iwan Baan View of the restored Bauhaus staircase, with Oskar Schlemmer’s Bauhaus Stairway (1932). Image © Iwan Baan View of the second floor looking east with new Museum Store, espresso bar and The Daniel and Jane Och Lounge. Image © Iwan Baan View of The Marlene Hess and James D. Zirin Lounge. Image © Iwan Baan + 10

Elizabeth Diller to Produce Opera for the High Line

13:00 - 20 January, 2017
Elizabeth Diller to Produce Opera for the High Line, © Iwan Baan
© Iwan Baan

Continuing in her firm’s tradition of blurring the lines between architecture, art and environment, Elizabeth Diller, founding partner of Diller Scofidio + Renfro, is producing an opera for the High Line. Dubbed the “Mile Long Opera,” the production will be set along New York’s new favorite attraction, which was designed by DS+R with James Corner and Piet Oudolf and opened to the public in 2009.

The 6 Architects Who Have Won MacArthur "Genius" Grants

12:20 - 22 September, 2016
The 6 Architects Who Have Won MacArthur "Genius" Grants, Blur Building. Exposition Pavilion: Swiss Expo, Yverdon-Les-Bains, 2002. Architects: Diller Scofidio + Renfro. Image © Diller Scofidio + Renfro
Blur Building. Exposition Pavilion: Swiss Expo, Yverdon-Les-Bains, 2002. Architects: Diller Scofidio + Renfro. Image © Diller Scofidio + Renfro

Today, the MacArthur Foundation announced the 23 recipients of their 2016 MacArthur Fellowship Grants, which are awarded annually “to encourage people of outstanding talent to pursue their own creative, intellectual, and professional inclinations.” Each fellowship comes with a stipend of $625,000 for the recipients to use for individual pursuits, paid out in equal quarterly installments over a five year period. Fellows are selected based on 3 criteria: exceptional creativity, promise for important future advances based on a track record of significant accomplishment, and potential for the fellowship to facilitate subsequent creative work.

This year’s fellows include artists, playwrights, geobiologists, poets, jewelrymakers, novelists and historians, but, for the fifth straight year, no architects. In the program’s 36 year history, just 6 recipients have come from architecture-related fields.

Interview: Elizabeth Diller on the Design of The Broad in Los Angeles

12:39 - 24 September, 2015

The Broad has officially opened its doors in downtown Los Angeles. Taking four years to complete, the highly anticipated, 120,000-square-foot building houses a prominent collection of postwar and international contemporary art owned by billionaire philanthropists Eli and Edythe Broad. During the press preview, VernissageTV caught up with the building's architect, Elizabeth Diller of Diller, Scofidio + Renfro, to gain a better understanding of The Broad's “veil over the vault" concept.

Excerpt: Conversations with Architects in the Age of Celebrity

08:30 - 18 August, 2015
CCTV Headquarters in Beijing by OMA. Image © OMA / Philippe Ruault
CCTV Headquarters in Beijing by OMA. Image © OMA / Philippe Ruault

No matter what you think of it, these days there is no denying that a celebrity culture has a significant effect on the architecture world, with a small percentage of architects taking a large portion of the spotlight. Questioning this status quo, Vladimir Belogolovsky's new book "Conversations with Architects in the Age of Celebrity" interrogates some of these famous architects to find out what they think of the culture which has elevated them to such heights. In this excerpt from the book's foreword, Belogolovsky asks how we got into this celebrity-loving architectural culture, and what it means for the buildings produced.

Not to be confused with other kinds of stars, the most popular of architects are identified as “starchitects.”* Is this a good thing? The notion of starchitecture is hated wholeheartedly by most of the leading architectural critics. They run away from addressing the issue because they think it has nothing to do with professional criticism. But what do the architects think? One of the architectural megastars, Rem Koolhaas, was astonishingly self-effacing in an interview for Hanno Rauterberg’s 2008 book Talking Architecture:

“I think what we are experiencing is the global triumph of eccentricity. Lots of extravagant buildings are being built, buildings that have no meaning, no functionality. It’s rather about spectacular shapes and, of course, the architects’ egos.”

Surface Mag Interviews Liz Diller on Architecture, Art, and Early "Aha" Moments

01:00 - 20 November, 2014
Surface Mag Interviews Liz Diller on Architecture, Art, and Early "Aha" Moments, © Ungano + Agriodima
© Ungano + Agriodima

Below is an excerpt of the cover story of this month’s Surface magazine: an in-depth interview with Elizabeth Diller, published online for the first time here on ArchDaily.

The 35-year career of Elizabeth Diller, a founding partner of the New York–based architecture studio Diller Scofidio + Renfro, is a study of contrasts: conceptual and pragmatic, temporary and permanent, iconoclastic and institutional. After graduating from Cooper Union in 1979, Diller started her practice mounting temporary installations with her partner and future husband, Ricardo Scofidio, their interests leaning closer to art and theory than conventional buildings and construction. Today the duo—along with Charles Renfro, who became a partner in 2004—is responsible for some of the most important architectural projects in the country. DS+R counts Boston’s Institute of Contemporary Art (completed in 2006) and a makeover of New York’s Lincoln Center (finalized in 2012) among its highest-profile works. Especially influential, at least among architects and academics, has been the firm’s unbuilt Slow House (1991), a proposal for a residence on Long Island, New York, renowned for its examination of how we see in a media-saturated world.

One notices sharp contrasts not just in the firm’s work history but in its public reception as well. Widely lauded for repurposing a dilapidated elevated railway into New York City’s beloved High Line park (the third phase opened in September), DS+R received heavy criticism this year for its involvement in a major expansion proposal for the Museum of Modern Art. The museum’s plans included the demolition of its little-guy neighbor, the American Folk Art Museum; despite efforts to work the idiosyncratic building into the design scheme, Diller’s studio, hired to lead the expansion, ultimately acknowledged that the structure couldn’t be saved.

Surface recently met with Diller at her office in Manhattan to speak about the ensuing controversy, as well as early career experiences that have influenced her firm’s recent commissions for cultural institutions, including the current exhibition “Musings on a Glass Box” at the Cartier Foundation in Paris (through Feb. 25, 2015), a collaboration with composer David Lang and sound designer Jody Elff. Diller, 60, is pensive and surprisingly relaxed for someone whose aides are constantly interrupting her to remind her of meetings she has to attend. She speaks with an erudite inflection befitting her academic credentials and professional accolades (she is, after all, a professor at Princeton and a MacArthur “genius grant” recipient), though she smiles with the ease of an affable neighbor.

The Berlage Archive: Elizabeth Diller (1998)

00:00 - 2 July, 2014

Glenn Lowry on American Folk Art Museum: The Decision Has Been Made

00:00 - 29 January, 2014
Glenn Lowry on American Folk Art Museum: The Decision Has Been Made, Rendering of the garden entrance of the new MoMA, by Diller Scofidio + Renfro. Image Courtesy of MoMA
Rendering of the garden entrance of the new MoMA, by Diller Scofidio + Renfro. Image Courtesy of MoMA

Yesterday, Glenn Lowry, director of the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), and Elizabeth Diller, principal of Diller Scofidio + Renfro, presented their plans for the MoMA expansion to an audience in New York City, insisting - once again - that they require the demolition of the American Folk Art Museum.

The presentation was part of a larger event, "A Conversation on the Museum of Modern Art’s Plan for Expansion," presented by The Architectural League, the Municipal Art Society, and the American Institute of Architects New York Chapter. After Lowry and Diller reiterated their case, a panel of experts - including the editor of Architectural Record, Cathleen McGuigan, and critic Nicolai Ouroussoff - gave their opinions on the subject (some panelists spousing particularly anti-MoMA sentiments). ArchDaily was there to catch the conversation; read on after the break for the highlights.