The Berlage Archive: Elia Zenghelis (2001)

In this 2001 lecture titled “Architecture is Propaganda,” seminal architect, educator, and co-founder of OMA Elia Zenghelis discusses the development of ideologies that shape architectural discourse vis-a-vis architectural education. Arguing that architectural education is motivated by religious, socio-political, and economic principles, Zenghelis makes the case that the war-torn 20th century has been an era of upheaval and conflict, resulting in the loss of historical context and a confused state for artists and architects. Proposing the idea that architecture is a servant of power, and is thus intrinsically intertwined with political and societal trends, Zenghelis urges a return to a contextualized understanding of architectural history in order for contemporary architects to develop a sensitive and nuanced approach to their practice. 

Discussing his relationships and collaborations with former students and colleagues Zaha Hadid, Rem Koolhaas, and Peter Eisenman, as well as the political and architectural legacy of such giants as Le Corbusier and Mies van der Rohe, Elia Zenghelis provides a compelling conversation about the inherent role of architecture in political discourse.

Don’t miss the other lectures in The Berlage Archive series

Drawings from Famous Architects’ Formative Stages to be Exhibited in St. Louis

Zaha Hadid, The World (89 Degrees), 1984. Image Courtesy of Kemper Art Museum

As a student of architecture, the formative years of study are a period of wild experimentation, bizarre use of materials, and most importantly, a time to make mistakes. Work from this period in the life of an architect rarely floats to the surface – unless you’re Zaha Hadid or Frank Gehry, that is. A treasure trove of early architectural drawings from the world’s leading architects has recently been unearthed from the private collection of former Architectural Association Chairman Alvin Boyarsky. The collection is slated to be shown at the Kemper Art Museum, Washington University, St. Louis, as a part of the Drawing Ambience: Alvin Boyarsky and the Architectural Association from September 12th to January 4th, 2015.

Take a look at the complete set of architects and drawings for the exhibition after the break.

Spotlight: Peter Eisenman

. Image Courtesy of an-onymous.com

Renowned architect, theorist and educator Peter Eisenman turns 82 today. Eisenman initially rose to fame in the late ‘60s, as part of the New York Five, a group that shared an interest in the purity of architectural form. Eisenman’s work, whether built, written or drawn, is characterized by Deconstructivism, with an interest in signs, symbols and the processes of meaning-making always at the foreground. As such, Eisenman has at times been a controversial figure in the architectural world, professing a disinterest in environmental sustainability.

From Autonomy to Automation: The Work of Peter Eisenman

BANAMID Architecture Research Institute in collaboration with AN.ONYMOUS will hold the third International conference from the “Contemporary Architecture: and the World Dialogue” series in Tehran, . The conference, titled “From Autonomy to Automation: The Work of Peter Eisenman” will focus on the defining legacy of Peter Eisenman spanning across 50 years of his intellectual and professional body of work. The conference will trace the evolution of Eisenman’s work over time and will examine its imprint on the contemporary discourse of architecture.

“From Autonomy to Automation” is organized in three main sessions: Autonomy (1968-1978), Archeology (1978-1988), and Automation (1988-present), corresponding to the three stages of Eisenman’s work. Each session would begin with an introductory talk by one of the conference speakers and will follow a response by Peter Eisenman. The speakers would then engage in a discussion with Peter Eisenman about his work. Other speakers include: Iman Ansari, Cynthia Davidson, Marta Nowak, and Meghdad Sharif.

The conference will take place on May 13th and 14th, 2014 at the main conference hall of Milad Tower in Tehran. The event is open to public to stimulate critical dialogues amongst participants, and instigate a broader discussion about the state of contemporary architecture in Iran. Conference organizers also anticipate that this event would promote intellectual and cross-cultural exchange between Iran and the rest of the world.

Title: From Autonomy To Automation: The Work of Peter Eisenman
Organizers: BANAMID Architecture Research Institute, AN.ONYMOUS
Speakers: Peter Eisenman, Cynthia Davidson, Iman Ansari, Marta Nowak, and Meghdad Sharif
Media Partners: Log, ArchDaily, Milad Tower Cultural Center, Banamid TV
Educational Partners: University of Tehran, Shahid Beheshti University
Date & Time: Tuesday May 13, 2014, 10:00-14:00 | Wednesday May 14, 2014 10:00
-14:00
Venue: Hafez Main Conference Hall, Milad Tower
Address: Milad Tower Private Access Road, Hakim Motorway, Tehran, Iran
Registration: Event information and registration at: http://event.banamid.ir/

And don’t miss this article, which originally appeared on Architectural Review, in which AN.ONYMOUS’s Iman Ansari interviews Peter Eisenman about his personal views on architecture throughout the course of his career.

The Contentious Legacy of the IAUS

, the founder of IAUS. Image Courtesy of an-onymous.com

In this in-depth article on Design ObserverBelmont Freeman examines the resurgence of interest in the Institute for Architecture and Urban Studies, Peter Eisenman‘s radical, theory-based school that existed from 1967-1985, and questions: what has been the Institute’s legacy in the 30 years since its demise? Read Freeman’s thoughts in the full article here.

ISSUES? Concerning the projects of Peter Eisenman

The conference will focus on Peter Eisenman’s long and outstanding oeuvre.Thematization of almost 50 years of his theoretical and educational work and almost 25 years of his full-time architectural practice is seen here as vital to the understanding of both the past and the presence of contemporary architecture. From the questions related to Renaissance heritage to the problems associated with disciplinary autonomy and the digital, the conference aims to provide a space for a critical debate among architects and theorists.

Built upon our previous experiences with the Architecture of Deconstruction / The Specter of Jacques Derrida, this year’s conference will provide a new and challenging form of interaction. It will disconnect from the standard model for scientific gatherings – session presentations followed by short discussion between participants. Conference will indeed be organized in several sessions, but as a form of thematic conversations with , regarding his work. Participants are welcome to provide rich and diverse readings on a number of subjects: to share their insights with Eisenman and with each other.

Title: ISSUES? Concerning the projects of Peter Eisenman
Organizers: University of – Faculty of Architecture
From: Mon, 11 Nov 2013
Until: Tue, 12 Nov 2013
Venue: University of Belgrade – Faculty of Architecture
Address: University of Belgrade, Faculty of Philology, 3 Studentski trg, Belgrade 11000, Serbia

Eisenman’s Evolution: Architecture, Syntax, and New Subjectivity

with in his office, New York 2013. Image Courtesy of an-onymous.com

In this article, which originally appeared on Architectural ReviewIman Ansari interviews Peter Eisenman about his personal views on architecture throughout the course of his career. 

Iman Ansari: More than any other contemporary architect, you have sought a space for architecture outside the traditional and conventional realm. You have continually argued that modern architecture was never fully modern and it failed to produce a cognitive reflection about the nature of architecture in a fundamental way.  From your early houses, we see a search for a system of architectural meaning and an attempt to establish a linguistic model for architecture: The idea that buildings are not simply physical objects, but artifacts with meaning, or signs dispersed across some larger social text. But these houses were also part of a larger project that was about the nature of drawing and representation in architecture. You described them as “cardboard architecture” which neglects the architectural material, scale, function, site, and all semantics associations in favor of architecture as “syntax”: conception of form as an index, a signal or a notation. So to me, it seems like between the object and the idea of the object, your approach favors the latter. The physical house is merely a medium through which the conception of the virtual or conceptual house becomes possible. In that sense, the real building exists only in your drawings.

Peter Eisenman: The “real architecture” only exists in the drawings. The “real building” exists outside the drawings. The difference here is that “architecture” and “building” are not the same.

SANAA’s ‘Cloud Boxes’ Wins First Prize in Taichung City Competition

First Prize. Image Courtesy of SANAA via City Cultural Center

SANAA, it is. In attempts to separate itself from its sister cities, Taichung City has named SANAA, led by Kazuyo Sejima and Ryue Nishizawa, winners of an international competition that intends to unite a newly formed city. As of December 2010, Taichung city executed a mega-merger that increased its population from 1 million inhabitants to 2.5 million, encompassing the skyscraping towers of downtown Taichung to the agricultural mountainside villages of Taichung County. As a result, the local government envisioned a new urban space that would place art at its core, celebrating the regions’ disparate cultures. 

Landmark Preservation Versus Ownership

Vanna Venturi House / ; © Maria Buszek

After years of disconcerting reports that the historic David and Gladys Wright House by Frank Lloyd Wright was under threat of demolition by developers, we announced that a generous benefactor saved it from its fate by providing funds to buy back the property. It seems that this particular story is not unique.  An article on ArchRecord by Frank A. Bernstein lists several other modern architecture treasures that may soon fall under the same threat as they hit the real estate market.

Find out more after the break.

Is Neighborhood Planning the New City Planning? A Conversation Between Peter Eisenman and P-A-T-T-E-R-N-S

Bettery Magazine: Q&A Series. Is neighborhood planning the new ? asks P-A-T-T-E-R-N-S

As part of its Question and Answer Series, Bettery Magazine joined Peter Eisenman and P-A-T-T-E-R-N-S to discuss the development of cities on an urban scale and the recent diversion of this development into the small scale of individual neighborhoods. What follows is a discussion that essentially describes the urban condition as a constant dialogue between scale and function.

There is an unstoppable element of spontaneous development that is a result of the city’s imposing forces as the scale of the individual and the immediate community.  Running concurrently with these developments are municipalities’ own agendas that may start off as heavy-handed, but eventually become molded by the will of affected neighborhoods.  This dynamic nature of cities and their functionality is what makes their nature unique and in constant flux.  In response to Eisenman’s question: “Is neighborhood planning the new city planning?”, P-A-T-T-E-R-N-S addresses the balance of these two scales of development and discusses the four morphological states that city development could take.

Join us after the break for more.

Venice Biennale 2012: The Piranesi Variations / Peter Eisenman

Field of Dreams / Knowlton School of Architecture © Nico Saieh

Inspired by the 13th International Architecture Exhibition‘s theme Common Ground, Peter Eisenman has formed a team to revisit, examine and reimagine Giovanni Battista Piranesi’s 1762 folio collection of etchings, Campo Marzio dell’antica Roma. Derived from years of fieldwork spent measuring the remains of ancient Roman buildings, these six etchings depict Piranesi’s fantastical vision of what ancient Rome might have looked like and represent a landmark in the shift from a traditionalist, antiquarian view of history to the scientific, archaeological view.

Eisenman’s team consists of Eisenman Architects, students from Yale University, Jeffrey Kipnis with his colleagues and students of the Ohio State University, and Belgian architecture practice, Dogma. Each group has contributed a response to Piranesi’s work through models and drawings that stimulate discourse on contemporary architecture. In particular, they explore architecture’s relationship to the ground and the political, social, and philosophical consequences that develop from that relationship.

The Project of Campo Marzio / Yale University School of Architecture © Nico Saieh

Described as “precise, specific, yet impossible”, Piranesi’s images have been a source of speculation, inspiration, research and contention for architects, urban designers and scholars since their publication 250 years ago. Continue after the break to learn more.

Peter Eisenman and Jeffrey Kipnis Lectures at SCI-Arc

Courtesy of SCI-Arc

Southern California Institute of Architecture (SCI-Arc) will be hosting the lectures of well-renowned architect, Peter Eisenman and architectural theorist, Jeffrey Kipnis at their W.M. Keck Lecture Hall in downtown . Eisenman’s lecture will take place Monday, March 5th at 7pm while Keck’s lecture will be held Tuesday, March 6th at 7pm. Both lectures are free and open to the public. More information after the break.

AIAS FORUM 2011 To Be Held In Sunny Phoenix Arizona

© AIAS

The annual AIAS FORUM meeting for 2011 will take a break from the snow of the past two years (2009 Minnesota, 2010 Toronto) and be held in sunny downtown Phoenix, FORUM is the annual meeting of the AIAS and the premier global gathering of architecture and design students. The conference provides students with the opportunity to learn about important issues facing architectural education and the profession, to meet students, educators, and professionals with common interests, and to interact with some of today’s leading architects through keynote addresses, tours, workshops and seminars, last years FORUM was attended by over 1,000 young and ambitious architecture students and AIAS members. This years Keynote Speakers will be Jeffrey Inaba, founder of C-Lab and former project manager with Rem Koolhaas and OMA, Brad Lancaster, author of www.harvestingrainwater.com, and University of Californa, San Diego architect and professor Teddy Cruz.

Video: Peter Eisenman

YouTube Preview ImageVintage photos and a detailed narration by Peter Eisenman describes the life and work of the University graduate. The documentary was created in honor of Eisenman’s 50th Reunion back in 2006. Nine well-respected colleagues and friends, including Richard Meier and Kenneth Frampton, share their experiences and thoughts about Eisenman. Exclusive video of Eisenman teaching at Yale is also included.

Just in case you missed it, Cornell also produced a documentary featuring Richard Meier. Check it out here.

AD Interviews: Peter Eisenman

Yesterday we showed you a preview, and here it is the full interview with one of the most influential contemporary architects.

Architect, educator, and theorist, internationally recognized Peter Eisenman was a part of an important generation of architects and popularized amongst the general public when he was exhibited at the MoMA in 1969 as one of the New York Five. Eisenman, along with Michael Graves, Charles Gwathmey, John Hejduk, and Richard Meier (Eisenman’s second cousin) made up the ‘group of architects whose work, represented a return to the formalism of early modern rationalist architecture’.

Eisenman earned a Bachelor of Architecture degree from Cornell University, a Master of Science in Architecture degree from Columbia University, and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from Cambridge University (U.K). He founded an international think tank for architecture, the Institute for Architecture and Urban Studies (IAUS), serving as director until 1982 and simultaneously established his own architecture firm.

As an educator, Eisenman has taught at some of the most prestigious architecture programs including the Yale School of Architecture, Cambridge, Princeton, Harvard, and Ohio State universities.

’s work ranges from large-scale housing and urban design to educational institutions and private houses.  Often labeled as a deconstructivist Eisenman is also known for his intricate drawings.  He has been recognized for his design abilities receiving the Medal of Honor from the New York chapter of the American Institute of Architects in 2001, the Smithsonian Institution’s 2001 Cooper-Hewitt National Design Award in Architecture, and he was also awarded the Golden Lion for Lifetime Achievement at the 2004 Venice Architecture Biennale.

In 2006 Eisenman’s design for the University of Phoenix Stadium for the Cardinals earned him the label as one of the top five innovators of 2006 according to Popular Science.

Eisenman’s most recent book Ten Canonical Buildings: 1950-2000 revisits some of the most important buildings of the past century with a critical view, a must read for every architect.

Projects by Eisenman previously featured at ArchDaily:

Peter Eisenman: American Architecture Today

is one of the most influential figures in contemporary architecture. Theorist, academic and practitioner, was part of a very important generation of architects and one of the New York Five.

In his recent book Ten Canonical Buildings: 1950-2000 Eisenman revisits some of the most important buildings of the past century with a critical view, a book that is in my opinion a must read for every architect.

During the interview Peter talks about the practice/project of architecture, his views on running an architecture practice, and the current state of American architecture, among other relevant topics. On this preview you can see his views on today’s American Architecture.

Full interview tomorrow!

Video: Rem Koolhaas and Peter Eisenman on today’s critical architectural discourse issues

Rem Koolhaas and Peter Eisenman, two of the most influential architects these days, discussing the current the issues which, for them, represent the most critical in architectural discourse today.

Both figures present ideas partly against the backdrop of their architecture, and conclude with a shared conversation chaired by CCA Founding Director Phyllis Lambert.

This event took place in June 2007 at the Center for Canadian Architecture, but as you will see the subjects in discussion are more present than ever.

warmly thanks the CCA for sharing this film.

Architecture City Guide: Berlin

This week, with the help of our readers, our Architecture City Guide is headed to . The twentieth century changed nearly all cities, but perhaps none more so than . From its destruction in World War II that left few historic buildings intact to its division until 1989 that brought together the architecture of two competing ideologies into one city, ’s modern and contemporary architecture speaks to a past that seldom accompanies such recent additions. The city is filled with new and wonderful architecture that might not have found space in other cities in Europe. With that in mind, we were unable feature all our readers’ suggestions on the first go around. We will be adding to the list in the near future, so please add more of your favorites in the comment section below. Once again, thanks to all our readers for your help.

The Architecture City Guide: Berlin list and corresponding map after the break.