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Sharing Models: Manhattanisms

16:00 - 23 June, 2016
Sharing Models: Manhattanisms

July 15th – September 2nd, 2016

July 14th Exhibition Opening
6 – 7 pm: Press and Members Preview [RSVP]
7 – 9 pm: Public Opening [RSVP]

We are experiencing the emergence of a culture that is marked by a return to, redefinition, and expansion of the notion of the commons. The increasing complexity and interconnectedness of globalization is reorienting us away from trends that have emphasized individuation and singular development, and toward new forms of collectivity.

Over the last decade, emerging technologies and economies have affected aspects of our everyday life, from the way we work and travel, to how we

SHoP Unveils Design for New Skyscraper in Manhattan's Lower East Side

16:00 - 28 April, 2016
SHoP Unveils Design for New Skyscraper in Manhattan's Lower East Side, Courtesy of SHoP
Courtesy of SHoP

SHoP has unveiled the design for a new 900 foot tall skyscraper in Manhattan’s Lower East Side. The 77 story, 500,000 square foot, mixed-income tower will have 600 units, 150 of which will be permanently affordable and distributed evenly throughout the building. The project has been developed as a collaboration between SHoP and JDS who are co-owners of the development, with the partnership of two not-for-profit groups: Two Bridges Neighborhood Council (TBNC) and Settlement Housing Fund (SHF).

Bjarke Ingels on Sculptural Skyscrapers and Refining Parameters in High Rise Design

07:30 - 18 April, 2016

In an interview with the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH), Bjarke Ingels reflects on the design of skyscrapers, noting how "sculpture is fine, but if its arbitrary it's not as interesting." Architects, Ingels argues, have the problem of "skilled incompetence:" the notion that they "already know the answer before [they've] even heard the question." This prevents them "from questioning the question, or having the question rephrased, or elaborating on the question, or even listening for the question – because [they] already know the answer."

OMA to Realize First Manhattan Building with Toll Brothers

16:00 - 15 April, 2016
OMA to Realize First Manhattan Building with Toll Brothers, © Flickr User: Daniel Chong Kah Fui דניאל 張家輝  licensed under CC BY-NC-ND 2.0
© Flickr User: Daniel Chong Kah Fui דניאל 張家輝 licensed under CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

OMA's first building in Manhattan will be a condo project at 122 East 23rd Street, built in collaboration with Toll Brothers City Living. Designed by OMA's New York principal Shohei Shigematsu, the residential tower culminates a decade leading the office and several previous attempts to realize a project in the region.

Heatherwick's Pier 55 Green-Lighted by New York Supreme Court

17:01 - 14 April, 2016
Heatherwick's Pier 55 Green-Lighted by New York Supreme Court , Pier 55.. Image ©  Pier55, Inc. and Heatherwick Studio, Renders by Luxigon
Pier 55.. Image © Pier55, Inc. and Heatherwick Studio, Renders by Luxigon

Pier 55, the floating park designed by Heatherwick Studio and landscape architecture firm, Signe Nielsen, received a green-light from the New York Supreme Court this past Friday, April 8, according to a report by the Architect’s Newspaper. Floating above the Hudson River on the Lower West Side of Manhattan, the park is anchored by an aggregation of enormous petal-like stilts that are submerged in the water below. The park is being funded by the philanthropy of Diane von Furstenberg and her husband Barry Diller.

Pier 55’s legal troubles began last spring when the non-profit, City Club of New York filed a lawsuit against Pier55 Inc. and Hudson River Park Trust (HRPT) to stop the project.

How the MetLife Building Redefined Midtown Manhattan

09:30 - 16 March, 2016
How the MetLife Building Redefined Midtown Manhattan, © Wikimedia user Jnn13 licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0
© Wikimedia user Jnn13 licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0

Recently the subject of a competition to reimagine its expansive facade, the MetLife building is one of Manhattan's most noticeable - and hated - buildings. In this article originally published on 6sqft as "Great Game Changers: How the MetLife Building Redefined Midtown Architecture," Carter B Horsley tells the tale of how the building came to be.

Perhaps the most detested midtown skyscraper by the public, this huge tower has, nevertheless, always been a popular building with tenants for its prime location over Grand Central Terminal and its many views up and down Park Avenue. It is also one of the world’s finest examples of the Brutalist architecture, commendable for its robust form and excellent public spaces, as well as its excellent integration into the elevated arterial roads around it.

However, it is also immensely bulky and its height monstrous. As shown in the photograph ahead, the building completely dominates and overshadows the former New York Central Building immediately to the north, which had been designed by Warren & Wetmore as part of the “Terminal City” complex. The New York Central Building, now known as the Helmsley Building, straddled the avenue with remarkable grace and its distinguished pyramid. As one of the city’s very rare, “drive-through” buildings, it was the great centerpiece of Park Avenue. But by shrouding such a masterpiece in its shadows, quite literally, the Pan Am Building (today the MetLife building) desecrated a major icon of the city that will unfortunately will never recover from this contemptible slight on such a prominent site.

With the Opening of the WTC Transportation Hub, Has Santiago Calatrava Been Vindicated?

09:30 - 4 March, 2016
With the Opening of the WTC Transportation Hub, Has Santiago Calatrava Been Vindicated?, via WTC Progress
via WTC Progress

After 12 long years and a series of construction headaches, Santiago Calatrava’s $4 billion World Trade Center Transportation Hub has finally opened to the public. Once widely regarded as a symbol of hope for post-9/11 New York, the project’s ballooning budget and security-related revisions gradually soured the opinions of the public and top design minds including Michael Graves and Peter Eisenman, and provoked a multitude of mocking nicknames ranging from “Calatrasaurus” to “squat hedgehog” to “kitsch dinosaur.” All the while, Calatrava urged critics to reserve their opinion until the project’s opening. Now that day has arrived - did Calatrava receive the vindication he was insistent would come? Read on for the critics’ takes.

SOM Unveils Manhattan West Development Plans

08:00 - 1 February, 2016
SOM Unveils Manhattan West Development Plans, Courtesy of SOM
Courtesy of SOM

Skidmore, Owings & Merrill (SOM) has released the plans for Manhattan West, a new office and residential development spanning five million square feet over the 2.6-acre platform that covers the active rail tracks connecting Penn Station to New Jersey and Upstate New York.

A First Look at Álvaro Siza's First US Building

16:00 - 26 January, 2016
A First Look at Álvaro Siza's First US Building, Courtesy of Noe & Associates and The Boundary; Via The Architects' Newspaper
Courtesy of Noe & Associates and The Boundary; Via The Architects' Newspaper

An image of Álvaro Siza's first US building has been released. The luxury New York tower, planned for the corner of West 56th Street and Eleventh Avenue in Midtown, will rise up to 120 meters (just over 400 feet) and offer 80 units, a private roof garden, sun deck, spa and fitness center, and more. 

Siza is working with real estate development firms Sumaida + Khurana and LENY on the project. Sumaida + Khurana is the same developer who is collaborating with Tadao Ando on a luxury condominium at 152 Elizabeth Street

Maya Lin Designs Urban Mansion in New York

14:00 - 22 January, 2016
Maya Lin Designs Urban Mansion in New York, © Maya Lin Studio/Bialosky + Partners Architects via Tribeca Trib
© Maya Lin Studio/Bialosky + Partners Architects via Tribeca Trib

Maya Lin has been commissioned to design a 20,000-square-feet urban mansion in New York's Tribeca neighborhood. The five-story proposal, seen first on Tribeca Trib, aims to replace a 1980s mixed-use building on 11 Hubert Street. If approved, the of metal, glass and limestone building would rise 70-feet and house five bedrooms, 11 bathrooms, a dog room, wine closet, screening room, landscaped courtyard, 5,000-square-foot fitness center, basement, garage and more. 

COOKFOX Wins Preservation Approval for Manhattan Condominium

14:00 - 28 December, 2015
COOKFOX Wins Preservation Approval for Manhattan Condominium, South. Image © COOKFOX Architects
South. Image © COOKFOX Architects

The New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission has approved COOKFOX Architect's plans for a mid-rise, 66-unit condominium building in Manhattan. Planned for two parcels of land in the West End Collegiate Historic District, next to one of the Churches' five ministries, the project aims to "fit harmoniously with the distinct streetscape" while "interweaving the rich historic details of the Upper West Side with subtle contemporary and sustainable design."

Mark Foster Gage's Manhattan Skyscraper Takes Gothic Architecture to New Heights

13:30 - 15 December, 2015
Mark Foster Gage's Manhattan Skyscraper Takes Gothic Architecture to New Heights, © Mark Foster Gage Architects
© Mark Foster Gage Architects

This isn't your typical New York skyscraper; Mark Foster Gage has been commissioned to design a 1492-foot-tall luxury tower in Manhattan - 41 West 57th Street. Described by Skyscraper City as the "missing link between Beaux Arts, Art Deco, Expressionism, Gaudi-Modernisme and Contemporary architecture," the outlandish design boasts a uniquely carved facade cloaked in balconies custom tailored for each of its 91 residential units. 

"I think that many of the supertall buildings being built in New York City are virtually free of architectural design - they are just tall boxes covered in a selected glass curtain wall products. That is not design," said Gage. 

The New New York Skyline (Sunlight Not Included)

14:00 - 30 November, 2015
The New New York Skyline (Sunlight Not Included), The full diagram available on the National Geographic (link below). Image © National Geographic
The full diagram available on the National Geographic (link below). Image © National Geographic

With New York's skyline on the rise, Fast Company says that there will no longer be sunlight on the streets of Manhattan by 2020 (unless you can afford a rooftop penthouse). Thirty-four skyscrapers 700-feet and taller are currently in-progress or being proposed, adding to 41 that already exist. This may seem like a lot, but as Fast Company also points out London has 230 new towers over 20 stories planned. See National Geographic's "The New New York Skyline" illustration for a closer look. 

REX to Design World Trade Center Performing Arts Building in New York

11:41 - 20 November, 2015
REX to Design World Trade Center Performing Arts Building in New York, WTC site. Image © James Ewing OTTO
WTC site. Image © James Ewing OTTO

A commission that was originally set to be Frank Gehry's, Brooklyn-based REX has been selected to design The Performing Arts Center at New York's World Trade Center site - PACWTC. REX was chosen over finalists Henning Larsen Architects and UNStudio through a "rigorous invitational process" that focused on the practices' experience with similar projects, including REX's Dee and Chales Wyly Theater in Dallas, Seattle Public Library and Vakko Fashion Center in Istanbul.

"Throughout the architectural selection process, REX presented us with an inspired vision. Joshua [Prince-Ramus] totally blew us away with his innovative ideas about how to present cutting-edge culture, but also about how to make the PAC relate to everyone who comes to the WTC site," said PACWTC director and president Maggie Boepple.  

ODA's Manhattan Tower Offers Residents a Slice of Suburbia in the Sky

14:30 - 16 November, 2015
ODA's Manhattan Tower Offers Residents a Slice of Suburbia in the Sky, © Moso Studio
© Moso Studio

Inspired by the recent trend for super-skinny, super-tall skyscrapers currently dominating the Manhattan luxury residential market, ODA New York has developed a design for 303 East 44th Street which they describe as "a new urban reality" for the city. By taking a prototypical, modestly-sized tower building and stretching it skyward, the firm has inserted sculptural skygardens in the voids opened up between the floors to create a tower that combines the advantages of urban living with the spatial benefits of the suburban home.

© Moso Studio © Moso Studio © Moso Studio © Moso Studio +17

New Images Released of Foster + Partners' Seagram-Adjacent Condos in New York

14:00 - 11 November, 2015
New Images Released of Foster + Partners' Seagram-Adjacent Condos in New York, © DBOX
© DBOX

RFR and Foster + Partners have released new images of One Hundred East 53rd Street, a 63-story luxury residential tower in New York next to Mies van der Rohe's famed Seagram Building. The skyscraper, which was announced last year, will contain 94 residences, a swimming pool, wellness facility, spa, library and sitting rooms, and its trademark Foster minimalism is intended to "provide a counterpoint to the Seagram’s bronze edifice," according to the developers RFR.

© DBOX © DBOX © DBOX © DBOX +7

This Proposed Pedestrian Bridge Lets You Walk Between Manhattan and New Jersey

08:00 - 14 October, 2015
This Proposed Pedestrian Bridge Lets You Walk Between Manhattan and New Jersey, Courtesy of Jeff Jordan Architects, via http://libertybridgeorg.wix.com/libertybridge
Courtesy of Jeff Jordan Architects, via http://libertybridgeorg.wix.com/libertybridge

Despite being separated by only a few miles, Manhattan and Jersey City seem much further apart; the Hudson River forces commuters to take long, roundabout routes or rely on the over-worked PATH system. Inspired by a need for connectivity between the two cities, Kevin Shane began conceptualizing a new pedestrian bridge, dubbed Liberty Bridge, which would connect Jersey City to Battery Park. Read more about this conceptual proposal after the break.

Images Released of Moshe Safdie's First New York Project

12:18 - 17 September, 2015
Images Released of Moshe Safdie's First New York Project, © Safdie Architects
© Safdie Architects

Images of Moshe Safdie's first New York project has been released. Planned to rise on a Manhattan site at West 30th Street, between Broadway and 5th Avenue, the 64-story mixed-use tower will feature a limestone base that compliments and serves its historic neighbor: the Marble Collegiate Church, one of the Collegiate Churches’ five ministries.

The building "will be distinguished by its vertical massing, which breaks down the scale of the tower into a series of three-story-high, offset projections," says Safdie Architects. "The offset projections also provide energy efficiency by self-shading the tower’s facade, further enhanced by additional sun shading at the south facade."