Get to Grips with Guggenheim Helsinki’s Record-Breaking Competition with this Infographic Video

By now, when the design competition for the Guggenheim Helsinki is mentioned, one number probably comes to mind: 1,715, the record-breaking number of submissions which the competition received. But how can this number be put into perspective? Why, with more numbers of course. Take 5,769 for example, which is the total height in meters of all the A1 presentation boards arranged vertically. Or take 18,336,780, the estimated value in Euros of all the work submitted.

Check out this great video from Taller de Casquería, which gives a rundown of all of the mind-blowing statistics generated by the competition, and concludes with this strong message to the Guggenheim itself: “These are incredible figures that show the impact that the Guggenheim Foundation has throughout the world… Guggenheim should document this to recognize their success in helping to shape a global community, dedicated to visual culture.”

Guggenheim Creates New Curatorial Position for Architecture and Digital Initiatives

AD Classics: Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum / . Image © Flickr CC User Richard Anderson

Architect and scholar  has been appointed as the Guggenheim’s new Curator of Architecture and Digital Initiatives. Therrien will now contribute to the development of the museum’s engagement with architecture, design, technology, and urban studies, in addition to providing leadership on select new projects under the direction of the Chief Curator and the Director’s Office.

“Advancing innovative programming that relates to architecture, technology, and urban studies, particularly on a global stage, is a priority for the Guggenheim,” Richard Armstrong, director of the Guggenheim stated. “Troy’s impressive and dynamic background spanning academia, architecture, and computer science should expand our forward-looking curatorial team.” Read the complete press release, here.

Twitter Reacts to 1,715 Guggenheim Designs

The news that every single one of the 1,715 designs for the future Guggenheim Museum in Helsinki have been released via a new competition website was understandably something of a media storm earlier this week. As the largest ever set of proposals to be simultaneously released to the public, how could anyone possibly come to terms with the sheer number and quality of the designs – let alone all the other issues which the proposals shed light on?

In this instance, the answer to that question is simple: get help. Guggenheim Helsinki will arguably go down in history as the prototypical competition for the social media age, not just for releasing the designs to the public but for their platform which enables people to select favorites, and compile and share shortlists. In the days since the website launched, Twitter users have risen to the challenge. See what some of them had to say after the break.

See All 1,715 Entries to the Guggenheim Helsinki Competition Online

GH-7128234610. Image Courtesy of Malcolm Reading Consultants

The competition for the new Guggenheim Museum in Helsinki closed last month, becoming the most popular architectural competition in history with 1,715 entries. Now, competition organizers Malcolm Reading Consultants have made every single one available to view online, with each anonymous proposal presented in a series of two images, and a short description fro the architects. “Since its inception, this competition has been organized to be welcoming, inclusive, and transparent, and the gallery presents a singular opportunity for the public to explore and consider the broad expanse of entries,” says Richard Armstrong, Director of the Solomon R. and Foundation.

Competition organizer Malcolm Reading added: “For anyone interested in design, the gallery is a tremendous resource that offers rare insight into the design process and further illustrates how the vision for a … [has] captured the imagination of architects around the world.”

And indeed, the website does provide a tremendous tool: with such a huge volume of entries, the database and its associated tagging system offer an interesting way to probe the architectural zeitgeist: for example, it seems ‘curved’ buildings are almost twice as popular as ‘straight’ buildings; and ‘opaque’ buildings are still unpopular, being outpaced by ‘transparent’ buildings by almost five to one, despite the traditionally opaque museum typology.

But when it comes to architectural quality, where do you even begin with 1,715 proposals? The competition’s website has that covered too, with a favorites button, a six-building shortlist tool and a search-by-registration tool. ArchDaily is here to help too: after the break, we’ve hand-picked 50 of the most exciting, unusual, interesting and simply absurd proposals for you to start talking about.

Guggenheim Considers Competition for Second NYC Location

Frank Lloyd Wright, Solomon R. , New York, 1956-59 (Click image to learn more). Image © Flickr CC User Richard Anderson

The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum is planning to construct a second location in . As reported on the Art Newspaper, the expansion project, known as the “Collection Center,” aims to “consolidate its staff and art storage into one efficient, multi-use building with a dynamic public programming component.” The news broke with the release of a curatorial job position, seeking personnel to assist in the center’s planning and a possible architecture competition that will ensure the “Guggenheim’s reputation for being a visionary architectural patron” is preserved. Meanwhile, the Guggenheim is expected to narrow its selection to six for its new Helsinki location in November.

Guggenheim Helsinki To Launch Search for Architect

Site of the potential .. Image Courtesy of Apple Map View

The Art Newspaper reports that the Guggenheim will launch an international competition on June 4th to find an architect to design a satellite in , Finland focused on “Nordic and international architecture and design, and their connection contemporary art.”

At the conclusion of the architectural competition, a decision will be made about whether or not to go through with the project. According to ArchDaily contributor and Helsinki resident, Laura Iloniemi, the potential museum has already stirred up considerable excitement – and debate – in Finland. Discover more details at The Art Newspaper.

What the Guggenheim Should Consider Before Building in Helsinki

The / . Image © Flickr User: Iker Merodio

The Guggenheim is planning a new museum in Helsinki. The site is in the heart of the city, next door to the late 19th Century market hall and open-air market place, two minutes from Helsinki Cathedral. The project, therefore, has great landmark potential for the city. And many Finns are lured by this very potential, wanting to increase tourism and put their capital city more evidently on the world map. There has also been discussion in the country’s main newspaper Helsingin Sanomat about how Finns should welcome a more joyous and fun architecture.

Destination-creation and architecture as entertainment are certainly strong themes of our times.  They were treated with great artistry by Frank Gehry with the Bilbao Guggenheim, opened in 1997. However, it’s important to remember that the Bilbao Guggenheim might best be considered a spectacular one-off. Mayors, politicians and world leaders have since sought, in perhaps too facile a way, to rebrand their cities and countries with iconic landmarks. There has been much talk of making cities “world class” through such architectural gestures, and yet much of this marketer’s fodder is wholly out of touch with what makes great architecture great.

James Turrell Transforms the Guggenheim

Aten Reign, 2013 / James Turrell; Photo: David Heald © Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, New York

With one of his largest installations to date, American artist James Turrell has transformed the rotunda of Frank Lloyd Wright’s iconic Guggenheim Museum into a mesmerizing Skyspace. Shifting between natural and artificial light, Aten ReignJames Turrells main attraction – illuminates the central void with a brightly colored, banded pattern that imitates the museum’s famous ramps. This presents a dynamic perceptual experience in which the materiality of light is exposed.

More images after the break. 

Frank Lloyd Wright’s Guggenheim Rotunda to be Transformed into Turrell Skyspace

: Rendering for Aten Reign, 2013, Daylight and LED light, Site-specific installation, Solomon R. , New York © , Rendering: Andreas Tjeldflaat, 2012 © SRGF

With his first exhibition in a New York museum since 1980, James Turrell will dramatically transform the sinuous curves of Frank Lloyd Wright’s Guggenheim Museum into one of the largest Skyspaces he has ever mounted. Opening on summer solstice, June 21, 2013, the temporary installation Aten Reign will give form museum’s central void by creating what Turrell has described as “an architecture of space created with light.”

YouTube Play: A Biennial of Creative Video / Guggenheim Museum by Frank Lloyd Wright

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This video is just a sneak peak of the exterior projections to be expected on the facade of ’s Guggenheim Museum in New York this evening.  It will be a full live streamed event 8pm ET where 25 videos selected by the jury for YouTube Play: A Biennial of Creative Video will be featured.  This is the inaugural event held by YouTube Play: Live from the Guggenheim.

Earlier this week we featured Vimeo’s Festival+Awards which featured a projection mapping performance on ’s IAC Building in NYC.  You can check that video out here.

Did you know that ArchDaily has it’s own Vimeo site?  Be sure to take a look.

What time will the live stream happen in your city: 1am (Oct 22) London, 2am CET – Paris, Amsterdam, Madrid, Berlin, Rome, 4am Moscow, 9am Tokyo, 11am Sydney.

BMW Guggenheim Lab

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In the next six years, a new collaboration between the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation and the BMW Group is seeking to explore various issues of urban life. Three labs, which will be assigned a theme, an architect, and a graphic designer, will be placed in major cities that will engage the public, bringing people together to discuss and experiment with new ideas.   Traveling across the globe, the labs will interact with people from all different backgrounds and cultures with the intention to shed light upon a broad spectrum of issues.

More about the after the break.