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Stacked Planters House / VTN Architects

13:00 - 14 September, 2017
Stacked Planters House / VTN Architects, © Hiroyuki Oki
© Hiroyuki Oki

© Hiroyuki Oki © Hiroyuki Oki © Hiroyuki Oki © Hiroyuki Oki + 15

  • Architects

  • Location

    Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam
  • Principal Architect

    Vo Trong Nghia
  • Project Architects

    Masaaki Iwamoto, Nguyen Quynh Han, Kuniko Onishi
  • Contractor

    Wind and Water House JSC
  • Area

    260.0 m2
  • Project Year

    2017
  • Photographs

20 Incredible Images of Architecture and Animals: The Best Photos of the Week

12:00 - 10 September, 2017
20 Incredible Images of Architecture and Animals: The Best Photos of the Week

For the animal lovers among our audience, this week we have put together a special roundup of images of architecture alongside some marvelous critters. While not exactly a mainstay of architectural photography, proponents of the form like BoysPlayNice, Jesus Granada and Rafael Gamo have dared to include animal inhabitants in their architectural compositions. Read on to see a selection of 20 creative images where you will find horses, sheep, cows, goats, dogs, cats, and even elephants.

White Cube House / MM++ architects

22:00 - 7 September, 2017
White Cube House  / MM++ architects, © Hiroyuki Oki
© Hiroyuki Oki

© Hiroyuki Oki © Hiroyuki Oki © Hiroyuki Oki © Hiroyuki Oki + 52

  • Architects

  • Location

    Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam
  • Architect in Charge

    Mỹ An Phạm Thị, Michael Charruault
  • Project Year

    2016
  • Photographs

18 House / Khuon Studio + Phan Khac Tung

22:00 - 6 September, 2017
18 House / Khuon Studio + Phan Khac Tung, © Hiroyuki Oki
© Hiroyuki Oki

© Hiroyuki Oki © Hiroyuki Oki © Hiroyuki Oki © Hiroyuki Oki + 50

DESINO Eco Manufactory Office / Ho Khue Architects

22:00 - 5 September, 2017
DESINO Eco Manufactory Office / Ho Khue Architects, © Hiroyuki Oki
© Hiroyuki Oki

© Hiroyuki Oki © Hiroyuki Oki © Hiroyuki Oki © Hiroyuki Oki + 40

  • Architects

  • Location

    Bình Chánh, Ho Chi Minh, Vietnam
  • Interiors Design

    Oakpin Interiors
  • Area

    621.0 m2
  • Project Year

    2015
  • Photographs

D House / KIENTRUC O

00:00 - 5 September, 2017
© Hiroyuki Oki
© Hiroyuki Oki

© Hiroyuki Oki © Hiroyuki Oki © Hiroyuki Oki © Hiroyuki Oki + 27

  • Architects

  • Location

    Vietnam
  • Lead Architect

    Đàm Vũ
  • Design Team

    An-Ni Lê, Dân Hồ, Tài Nguyễn, Duy Tăng, Nhung Hồ
  • Area

    775.0 m2
  • Project Year

    2017
  • Photographs

House in Chau Doc / NISHIZAWAARCHITECTS

00:00 - 31 August, 2017
© Hiroyuki Oki
© Hiroyuki Oki

© Hiroyuki Oki © NISHIZAWAARCHITECTS © Hiroyuki Oki © Hiroyuki Oki + 39

How (and Why) to Let Weather Into Your Buildings

09:30 - 24 August, 2017
How (and Why) to Let Weather Into Your Buildings

Bringing the weather inside is usually the opposite of what you want from a building envelope. However, new research from the University of Oregon, described in an article by The Washington Post, aims to show the physical and psychological benefits of letting nature inside. Signs of nature and change are both beneficial to our well-being, yet we don’t always have access to them when inside buildings—and humans are now spending 90% of our lives inside. But even in an urban setting, where nature may be hard to come by, there’s no escaping the weather. When researchers found ways to bring things like wind and dappled reflections of the sun inside, they found that exposure to these natural movements lowered heart rates, while being less distracting than similar artificially generated movements.

By now, green buildings are a familiar concept, but the article in The Washington Post proposes moving beyond green buildings as we know them today. While green building can be great in new construction, that excludes a lot of existing buildings that could and should also benefit from an intervention of nature. Ideally, buildings should actively demonstrate their relationship with nature, moving beyond simply “doing no harm.”

© Hiroyuki Oki © Carlos Chen © Alex de Rijke © Alejandro Arango + 7

World Photo Day 2017: Our Readers’ 100 Most-Bookmarked Architectural Photographs

08:00 - 19 August, 2017

This August 19th is World Photo Day, which celebrates photography on the anniversary of the day on which France bought the patent for the daguerreotype, one of the earliest photographic processes, and released it to the world for free in 1839. At ArchDaily, we understand the importance of photography in architecture—not only as a tool for recording designs, but also as a discipline that many of us enjoy. To celebrate the occasion, we decided to reveal the most popular images ever published on ArchDaily, as selected by you, our readers. Using data gathered from My ArchDaily, we have ranked the 100 most-saved images from our database; read on to see them.

Brick Passive Designed University / Taisei Corporation

19:00 - 14 August, 2017
Brick Passive Designed University / Taisei Corporation, © Hiroyuki Oki
© Hiroyuki Oki

© Hiroyuki Oki © Hiroyuki Oki © Hiroyuki Oki © Hiroyuki Oki + 18

  • Architects

  • Location

    Ecopark, Xuân Quan, Văn Giang, Hung Yen Province, Vietnam
  • Architects in Charge

    Yasutaka Maeda, Takaya Aramaki, Yuki Miyamoto
  • Area

    3731.0 m2
  • Project Year

    2017
  • Photographs

Materials That Make Construction Details Protagonists: Photos of the Week

12:00 - 6 August, 2017

We love construction details! That's why this week's photos highlight the art of the synthesis of materials and the varied photographic products we can obtain by looking closer. Photographers like Joel FilipeMarie-Françoise Plissart and Adria Goula, give us precise and beautiful exposure to wooden joints, steel structures, concrete details, curtain walls and more.

© Ivan Morison © Noel Arraiz © SWANG © Joel Filipe + 14

10 Incredible Exposed Structures: Photos of the Week

14:00 - 23 July, 2017

Putting aside finishes, coatings, and cladding to work with exposed structural elements is not an easy task. Faced with this challenge, architects have demonstrated an eagerness to surpass ourselves and to design increasingly creative structures. In portraying this type of project, there are often opportunities for photographers to create incredible and innovative compositions: from geometric patterns, to the use of symmetry and rhythm, to the possibility of focusing on the textures and details of the materials. Here, we present a selection of photographs of impressive structures by renowned photographers such as Iwan Baan, Julien Lanoo and Yao Li, among others.

© ICD/ITKE University of Stuttgart © Boegly + Grazia © Courtesy of CCDI © Eric Dinardi + 12

Innovative and Beautiful Uses of Brick: The Best Photos of the Week

07:00 - 16 July, 2017

It can't be denied that architects love brick. The material is popular both for its warmth and for the diversity of expressions that can be achieved by applying it in a creative way—depending on the arrangement of individual bricks or the combination of bonds, it’s possible to arrive at a result that is both original and attractive. That ingenuity is what photographers like Hiroyuki Oki, Gustavo Sosa Pinilla, and François Brix, among others, have attempted to capture in their photographs. In these images, light is a key element of good composition, allowing the photographers to control the intensity of color and the contrast of masses and voids, as well as enhancing the incredible textures of the brick we love so much.

© Courtesy of Atelier Alter © Photographix © Trieu Chien © Su Shengliang + 11

Architecture and the Human Scale: The Best Photos of The Week

09:30 - 9 July, 2017

The incorporation of the human figure is one of the most effective tools employed in architectural photography: it helps the viewer decipher the scale of work. While it successfully communicates a rough idea of the measurements of the elements photographed, it also makes architecture more relatable and accessible. People engage better with the built environment when it is populated; the human sense of society and community is the cornerstone of our civilization. With this in mind, we showcase a selection of our favorite photographs where the human figure takes center stage to enhance our reading of architecture.

© Doublespace © Hufton + Crow © Jordi Castellano © Adrien Williams + 11

Bamboo House / VTN Architects

02:30 - 16 May, 2017
Bamboo House / VTN Architects, © Hiroyuki Oki
© Hiroyuki Oki

Bamboo House / VTN Architects © Hiroyuki Oki Bamboo House / VTN Architects © Hiroyuki Oki + 19

  • Architects

  • Location

    Vietnam
  • Principal Architect

    Vo Trong Nghia
  • Associate Architect

    Kuniko Onishi
  • Area

    217.0 m2
  • Project Year

    2016
  • Photographs

Tropical Holiday Twin Houses / MM++ architects

19:00 - 9 May, 2017
© Hiroyuki Oki
© Hiroyuki Oki

© Hiroyuki Oki © Hiroyuki Oki © Hiroyuki Oki © Hiroyuki Oki + 34

  • Architects

  • Location

    Vietnam
  • Architect in Charge

    Mỹ An Phạm Thị
  • Collaborators

    Triết Lê Hữu, Michael Charruault
  • Area

    140.0 m2
  • Project Year

    2016
  • Photographs

22 Skinny Houses With a Narrow Footprint and a Broad Impact

06:00 - 25 April, 2017

Skinny houses have a wider appeal than their footprint would suggest. With cities becoming denser, and land becoming rare and expensive, architects are increasingly challenged to design in urban infill spaces previously overlooked. Although designing within these unusual parameters can be difficult, they often require an individual, sensitive response, which can often lead to innovative, playful, even inspiring results. With that in mind, here are 22 houses with a narrow footprint, and a broad impact.

Vegetable Trellis / Cong Sinh Architects

22:00 - 24 April, 2017
Vegetable Trellis  / Cong Sinh Architects, © Hiroyuki Oki
© Hiroyuki Oki

© Hiroyuki Oki © Hiroyuki Oki © Hiroyuki Oki © Hiroyuki Oki + 26

  • Architects

  • Location

    District 9, Ho Chi Minh, Vietnam
  • Architect in Charge

    Vo Quang Thi
  • Design Team

    Vo Quang Thi, Nguyen Thi Nha Van, Phung Kim Phuoc, Tran Ngoc Hung, Tran Tan Phat
  • Project Year

    2016
  • Photographs