Reims Archives / Hamonic + Masson & Associés

© Sergio Grazia

Architects: Hamonic + Masson & Associés
Location: 129 Yser Avenue, 51100 ,
Structural Engineer: SIBAT
Area: 5154.0 sqm
Year: 2014
Photographs: Sergio Grazia

Farming Kindergarten / Vo Trong Nghia Architects

© Gremsy

Architects: Vo Trong Nghia Architects
Location: Biên Hòa, Dong Nai, Vietnam
Principal Architects : Vo Trong Nghia, Takashi Niwa, Masaaki Iwamoto
Project Team: Tran Thi Hang, Kuniko Onishi
Area: 3800.0 sqm
Year: 2013
Photographs: Gremsy, Hiroyuki Oki

Win a Scholarship for the AA Visiting School in Santiago

What does Soviet Union architecture have to do with Chilean astronomy? A lot more than many realize. In the 1960s, the Soviet Union manufactured three Grand Passage Instrument telescopes (GIPpy), and their accompanying domes in Saint Petersburg. Unfortunately, they fell into ruin after the Soviet astronomical mission’s departure from following the 1973 military coup d-etat. Now, however, the Architectural Association Visiting School in Santiago, Chile, in partnership with the Pontifical Catholic University, will host a 10-day workshop in January on the GIPpy telescopes. The workshop is organized by the team that was recently awarded the Silver Lion at the 14th Venice Architecture Biennale for their work on Soviet prefabricated housing in Chile, and we’ve teamed up with the Visiting School to give away two £600 scholarships to attend the workshop!

For more information on the workshop and to find out how to enter to win a scholarship read on after the break…

Shenzhen Performing Arts Facility / ZOBOKI-DEMETER & Associates

Courtesy of ZOBOKI-DEMETER & Associates

Architects: ZOBOKI-DEMETER & Associates
Location: , Guangdong,
Year: 2014
Photographs: Courtesy of ZOBOKI-DEMETER & Associates , Zang Chao

Step Into the Multicolored Universe of the Pantone Hotel with these Eye-Watering Images

© Sven Laurent

The Hotel, a seven-story hotel in Brussels with decor inspired by the famous Pantone color system, opened for business in 2010, but these candy-colored images of its multi-hued rooms were new to us. Designed by interior designer Michel Penneman and architect Olivier Hannaert, and photographed by Sven Laurent, the serves up 59 rooms in a wide variety of color schemes, perfected by Pantone’s authoritative color matching system. It is the apotheosis of the company’s transition into manufacturing lifestyle products, with the “Pantone Universe” range containing everything from mugs to cufflinks, all colored to an exact specification with their identifying code.

Bosco / Makoto Yamaguchi Design

© Koichi Torimura

Architects: Makoto Yamaguchi Design
Location: Tokyo,
Design Team: Makoto Yamaguchi, So Sawada
Area: 551.0 sqm
Year: 2014
Photographs: Koichi Torimura

PKMN Architectures Creates Sliding Transformer House in Madrid

Courtesy of

“All I Own House is a project that materializes the interior of a house through its inhabitant’s personal belongings,” say PKMN Architectures about their All I Own House, a small customizable home and studio for client Yolanda Pila of ERREPILA Design Studio. Built in a small neighborhood in northern Madrid, the single-storey house belonged to the client’s grandmother. Now, it serves all the functions required of Yolanda’s dynamic living and working style.

EURALIS Headquarters / LCR Architectes

© Sylvain Mille

Architects: LCR Architectes
Location: , France
Associated Architect: Laporte Konikoff
Technical Office: OTCE Aquitaine
Area: 86455.0 ft2
Year: 2013
Photographs: Sylvain Mille, Courtesy of

Nadau Lavergne Architects Present Proposal to Revitalize Detroit’s Decaying Packard Plant

Courtesy of

Nadau Lavergne Architects, the winning team of the Reanimate the Ruins international ideas contest, have shared with us their proposal to revive Detroit‘s historic Packard Automotive Plant, the former factory which has become an icon of the city’s post-industrial decline. By developing a proposal which frees the land from unwanted structures and knits the colossal 1 kilometer-long building back into the urban landscape, Nadau Lavergne Architects have created a design which returns both a sense of community and some economic hope back to the building.

Read more about the proposal after the break

Slate House / Affleck de la Riva architects

© Alexandre Parent

Architects: Affleck de la Riva architects
Location: , QC,
Area: 256.0 sqm
Year: 2010
Photographs: Alexandre Parent

AD Classics: Geisel Library / William L. Pereira & Associates

© Darren Bradley

The alien form of the Geisel Library at the University of California, seems befitting of a backdrop from a science fiction movie. The building occupies a fascinating nexus between brutalism and futurism that its architect, William Pereira, intrepidly pursued throughout his career. With its strong concrete piers and hovering glassy enclosures, the library beautifully occupies an ambiguous state between massiveness and levitation, as if the upper stories have only just been set into their base and can be lifted back out at any moment. The tension between these two conditions gives the library an otherworldly appearance and provides a startling statement about the generative and imaginative power of the architect.

Chinkara House / Solis Colomer Arquitectos

© Marko Bradich

Architects: Solis Colomer Arquitectos
Location: ,
Architectural Design: Mauricio Solís
Project Area: 1114.0 m2
Photographs: Marko Bradich

Video: Why Should Architects be Concerned About Mobility?

With the rising success of electric and the highly anticipated introduction of self-driving , it is beginning to look like the ‘end of the automobile age’ which many predicted just a few years ago may never come. This was the sentiment presented by Audi CEO Rupert Stadler at the presentation of the Audi Urban Future Award last night: “The car has to be seen once again as a desirable object of progress,” he demanded. “To achieve this, we have to tear down the walls between infrastructure, public and individual traffic.” Audi’s New Urban Agenda therefore sets its sights on “solutions in which individual transportation makes a positive contribution in an overall system of different forms of mobility.”

The award, which saw Team Mexico City win with their proposal to crowd source up-to-the-minute traffic data which informs traffic planning decisions, highlights the relationship between cars, urban planning and ultimately architecture. “We have left mobility to the transportation experts for too many decades,” says Jose Castillo, a Harvard Professor and leader of Team Mexico City. “Nowadays thinking about urban space and infrastructure, this is something that architects have a lot to say about.”

Check out our video from the event above, where we asked participants from each of the four teams to outline in their view “why should architects be concerned about mobility?”

AR Issues: Architecture Has Nothing in Common with Luxury Goods

Courtesy of The Architectural Review

ArchDaily is continuing our partnership with The Architectural Review, bringing you short introductions to the themes of the magazine’s monthly editions. In this editorial from AR’s November 2014 issue, AR Editor Catherine Slessor uses the opening of Frank Gehry’s Fondation Louis Vuitton as occasion to examine the split that has developed within the architectural profession, musing “On how architecture can be either manifestation of vanity or source of social transformation.”

One of the most depressing illustrations of how far architecture has lost its grip on reality is Frank Gehry’s new handbag. Along with other selected ‘iconoclasts’ from the world of fashion, art and design, Gehry was tasked by French luxury goods purveyor to design a bespoke limited edition ‘piece’. Gehry’s new Fondation Louis Vuitton has just opened in Paris and he is the man of the hour, so it seems obvious that after designing a monumental repository for contemporary art, he should turn his hand to the trifling matter of a fashion accessory. The handbag is yours for £2490. The art museum is yours for around £100 million, though some speculate that it cost much, much more.

ARCHILIFE: Hollywood Stars Chill Out in Modernist Masterpieces

Courtesy of

Federico Babina is back, this time bringing some cinematic life to the world’s most well known modernist interiors with ARCHILIFE. ”I have never liked the lack of life in the architectural representations that are often aseptic, clean and neutral,” explains Babina. “I often enjoy imagining what life would be like in these static images.”

The images show history’s most famous film stars living out their daily routines in some of our favorite homes, bringing “the banality of everyday life” to these myths of both Architecture and Cinema. “We are used to perceiving and reading architecture as a set of almost metaphysical spaces. In a similar way we see the actors as characters and not as people,” he says. “I wanted to try to reverse these patterns: to transform the interior into ‘houses’ and the actors into ‘people’.”

From Marilyn and Mies to Caine and Kahn, the stars get a home to match their temperament, in which to relax, watch TV, meditate – and yes, to clean and tidy too.

See the full set of 17 ARCHILIFE images after the break – and just in case you missed them, check out Federico Babina‘s other popular illustration sets: ARCHIWINDOWARTISTECTARCHISET, ARCHIMACHINE, ARCHIPORTRAITARCHISTARCHIBET and ARCHICINE.

Renzo Piano Gains Planning Permission for Shard-Adjacent Residential Tower

View from Guy’s Hospital Quad. Image © RPBW

Renzo Piano Building Workshop has been awarded planning approval for Feilden House, a 26-storey residential building at London Bridge Quarter, directly adjacent to the Shard. Designed to complement the Shard and Place Buildings, the third piece of Piano‘s London Bridge Developments will add “generous public realm amenities” to the area at ground level.

LOIOS Recovery / ODDA

© Joao Morgado

Architects: ODDA
Location: Porto,
Design Team: Diogo Brito, Rodrigo Vilas-Boas, Francisco Lencastre, Lourenço Menezes Rodrigues
Area: 2500.0 sqm
Year: 2014
Photographs: Joao Morgado

© Richard Lea-Hair and Historic Royal Palaces
© Richard Lea-Hair and Historic Royal Palaces

Are Monuments And Memorials Intrinsically Introverted?

The Observer’s Rowan Moore “accidentally got swept into a tide of humanity at the weekend, or to put it another way, couldn’t move for crowds.” In memorial of the start of the centenary of World War One, of which today marks the anniversary of the armistice (11.11.1918), the Tower of London have installed a sea of 888,246 ceramic poppies in the former moat. The artwork, created by Paul Cummins and Tom Piper, and entitled Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red, ”has caught the national imagination.” For Moore, however, “it is deeply disturbing that a hundred years on from 1914, [the UK] can only mark this terrible war as a national tragedy.” He argues that “the spectacle of all these red poppies is emptier than that. [...] It is a deeply aestheticised, prettified and toothless war memorial.” Read the article in full here.