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世界最大机场: The Latest Architecture and News

Verticle Tides / Atelier Alter

Courtesy of Atelier Alter Courtesy of Atelier Alter Courtesy of Atelier Alter Courtesy of Atelier Alter + 23

Qingdao, China

KerryOn Living Room / Spark Architects

Courtesy of Spark Architects Courtesy of Spark Architects Courtesy of Spark Architects Courtesy of Spark Architects + 20

Shanghai, China

Second Stage of Hangzhou Yunqi Town Exhibition Centre / Approach Design (ZUP)

© Lianping Mao Rooftop Park . Image © Lianping Mao © Lianping Mao © Lianping Mao + 45

Hangzhou, China

Yunmen Mountain All-Seasons Ski Resort / ATAH + MADA s.p.a.m.

© Feng Shao © Feng Shao © Feng Shao © Feng Shao + 32

Qingzhou, China
  • Architects: ATAH, MADA s.p.a.m.
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area:  4000.0
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2018

Philip Yuan of Archi-Union Architects: "The Process of Construction can be Elevated to Art Performance"

Though the understated Swiss and British Pavilions were the big (and perhaps overly literal) winners at this year’s Venice Architecture Biennale investigating Freespace, it was the Chinese that put their relentless architectural progress on display. Nestled in the back of the Arsenale, the Chinese Pavilion presented dozens of built works all around Chinese countryside, each project demonstrating a meaningful social impact through the involvement of villagers in the production process. Among the most visible Chinese architects presenting at the pavilion was Shanghai-based educator and practitioner Philip Yuan, whose office Archi-Union Architects has become a major voice in the already-distinctive contemporary Chinese architecture scene.

On 19 July, 2018 curator Vladimir Belogolovsky will join gallerist and curator Ulrich Müller to discuss Philip Yuan’s work at the opening of Archi-Union Architects Collaborative Laboratory exhibition at Architektur Galerie Berlin. Belogolovsky’s interview with Philip Yuan follows after the break:

Songjiang Art Campus, Shanghai / Archi-Union Architects. Image Courtesy of Archi-Union Architects Courtesy of Archi-Union Architects The office of Archi-Union Architects in Shanghai. . Image Courtesy of Archi-Union Architects Lanxiting, Chengdu / Archi-Union Architects. Image © SHEN Zhonghai + 24

Han Wenqiang of ARCHSTUDIO: “Let’s Call My Work the Art of Coordination”

Throughout the work of Beijing-based practice ARCHSTUDIO, there is a constant feeling of sensitivity to culture and history. That is not to say that the firm’s designs are not modern—far from it in fact—but that the work of founder Han Wenqiang infuses modern materials and forms with a distinctly Chinese sensibility, that is just as apparent in his designs for a food packaging facility as it is in a Buddhist shrine (incidentally, both designs which won ArchDaily Building of the Year Awards, in 2017 and 2018 respectively). In the latest interview from his “City of Ideas” series, Vladimir Belogolovsky speaks to Han about whether architecture is an art form and what it means to create “Chinese” architecture in the 21st century.

Haitang Villa, 2015. Image © Magic Penny Tangshan Organic Farm, 2015. Image © Weiqi Jin Twisting Courtyard, 2017. Image © Weiqi Jin Waterside Buddhist Shrine, 2017. Image © Weiqi Jin + 53

Pine Park Pavilion / DnA

© Ziling Wang © Ziling Wang © Ziling Wang © Ziling Wang + 25

Lishui, China
  • Architects: DnA
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area:  197.0
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2017

Atelier Deshaus: "The Idea Is Not to Create an Object But to Construct a Path"

In China's newly emerging constellation of famed architects, few firms elicit the sense of surprise caused by the work of Atelier Deshaus. With projects ranging from awe-inspiring to humble, their work does not adhere to any stylistic rules, but all of their projects exude an enigmatic aura. In this interview, the latest in Vladimir Belogolovsky’s “City of Ideas” series, principals Liu Yichun and Chen Yifeng discuss the role of identity in their work and how they try to connect their buildings to the landscape.

Vladimir Belogolovsky: Is it true that you each design different projects in the studio? Why is that?

Liu Yichun: This has been true since 2010. Before that we always designed everything together. We used to have endless discussions and too many disagreements and arguments. That’s why we decided to pursue two parallel paths. This approach led to greater efficiency and it helped us to formulate clearer ideas of our independent views of architecture. It also helps us to diversify our work and to avoid forming one recognizable style.

Chen Yifeng: It is important for us to express our solutions differently, even though, fundamentally, we are working in one direction and pursuing one family of ideas.

Long Museum West Bund, Shanghai, 2014. Image © Shengliang Su Kindergarten of Jiading New Town, Shanghai, 2008. Image © Shu He Spiral Gallery I, Shanghai, 2011. Image © Shu He Huaxin Wisdom Hub, Shanghai, 2015. Image © Hao Chen + 28

Brown Sugar Factory / DnA

© Ziling Wang © Ziling Wang © Ziling Wang © Ziling Wang + 34

Lishui, China
  • Architects: DnA
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area:  1230.0
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2016

Shimen Bridge / DnA

© Dan Han © Ziling Wang © Ziling Wang © Ziling Wang + 12

Lishui, China
  • Architects: DnA
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area:  460.0
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2017

Ma Yansong: “Some People May Say My Work Is Futuristic, But I See It as Traditional”

With the unconventional, undulating forms of his buildings—and the fact that his path to architectural success included a stint working for Zaha HadidMa Yansong is often miscategorized as an architect of the latter generation of Deconstructivists, interested only in futuristic forms that push the boundaries of technology for the sake of innovation as an end in itself. But in fact Ma’s designs, especially those in his home country of China, are deeply rooted in nature and tradition, as he explains in the latest interview from Vladimir Belogolovsky’s “City of Ideas” series.

Chaoyang Park Plaza. Image © Hufton + Crow Harbin Opera House. Image © Iwan Baan Huangshan Mountain Village. Image © Fernando Guerra |  FG+SG Absolute Towers. Image © Iwan Baan + 93

O-office Discusses How Refurbishment Projects Reveal Untold Stories

SZ-HK Biennale-Silo Reconversion. Image© O-office & Maurer United
SZ-HK Biennale-Silo Reconversion. Image© O-office & Maurer United

Guangzhou-based multidisciplinary firm O-office Architects specializes in refurbishment projects. Founders Jianxiang He and Ying Jiang are known for exploring what architecture can do within the contemporary Chinese context, including a recent project in which they transformed an abandoned Shenzhen factory into a dynamic cultural and community center.

In this interview with ArchDaily, the founders of O-office speak about their philosophies regarding refurbishments and the current state of architecture in China.

Tsingpu Yangzhou Retreat / Neri&Hu Design and Research Office

© Pedro Pegenaute
© Pedro Pegenaute

© Pedro Pegenaute © Pedro Pegenaute © Pedro Pegenaute © Pedro Pegenaute + 38

Yangzhou, China

Studio Cottage / Christian Taeubert + Sun Min

© Boris Shiu
© Boris Shiu

© Boris Shiu © Boris Shiu © Boris Shiu © Boris Shiu + 20

Beijing, China

Yoga Studio / Kostas Chatzigiannis Architecture

© Joshua Tintner © Joshua Tintner © Joshua Tintner © Joshua Tintner + 35

Yangpu, China

See the Structural Skeleton of Zaha Hadid Architects' New Airport Terminal in Beijing

Zaha Hadid Architects' new passenger terminal for Beijing Airport (currently known as Beijing Daxing International Airport) is poised to become the largest aviation hub in the world. The vast structure, defined by five limbs spreading out from a central core, will cover an area of 313,000 square meters. It has been reported that each "arm" will use images from Chinese culture, including "silk, tea, porcelain, farmlands, and Chinese gardens."

Chinese Company Constructs the World's Tallest 3D Printed Building

Once again, Chinese company WinSun Decoration Design Engineering Co has expanded the capabilities of 3D printing. After constructing ten houses in under twenty-four hours last year, now they are back with both the world's tallest 3D printed building - a five-story apartment block - and a 1,100 square meter mansion with internal and external decoration to boot.

On display in Suzhou Industrial Park in Jiangsu province, the two buildings represent new frontiers for 3D printed construction, finally demonstrating its potential for creating more traditional building typologies and therefore its suitability for use by mainstream developers.

A close-up of the construction system. Image via www.3ders.org Image via australiandesignreview.com Image via www.3ders.org Image via australiandesignreview.com + 7

Update: Erdos Museum / MAD

When we first saw MAD’s Erdos Museum for Inner Mongolia, the renderings teased us with a futuristic blob-like form that was planned for Ordos’ designed, but yet not constructed, urban masterplan. Now, a few years later, the firm is celebrating the museum’s completion and the finished effect of both the form and its materiality can be fully appreciated. MAD shared a video on the finished project with us and we hope you enjoy it!

More info about the project after the break.