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Rasmus Hjortshõj

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Embodied Energy in Building Materials: What it is and How to Calculate It

All human activities affect the environment. Some are less impactful, some much, much more. According to the United Nations Environment Program (UNEP), the construction sector is responsible for up to 30% of all greenhouse gas emissions. Activities such as mining, processing, transportation, industrial operations, and the combination of chemical products result in the release of gases such as CO2, CH4, N2O, O3, halocarbons, and water vapor. When these gases are released into the atmosphere, they absorb a portion of the sun's rays and redistribute them in the form of radiation in the atmosphere, warming our planet. With a rampant amount of gas released daily, this layer thickens, which causes solar radiation to enter and and stay in the planet. Today, this 'layer' has become so thick that mankind is beginning to experience severe consequence, such as desertification, ice melting, water scarcity, and the intensification of storms, hurricanes, and floods, which has modified ecosystems and reduced biodiversity.

As architects, one of our biggest concerns should be the reduction of carbon emissions from the buildings we construct. Being able to measure, quantify, and rate this quality is a good way to start.

World Architecture Festival 2019: Watch the Live Stream

Follow along during the twelfth edition of the World Architecture Festival through ArchDaily's Live Stream. As the world’s biggest architectural awards program, WAF brings together more than 2,000 architects and designers to Amsterdam for three days of conference programs, awards, and exhibition events from December 4-6. Tune in to our Facebook live streams for a selection of lectures.

© Rasmus Hjortshoj Courtesy of JKMM Architects, WAF Courtesy of Mecanoo Architecten, WAF © Safdie Architects, WAF + 5

Panda House Observation Center / BIG

© Rasmus Hjortshoj © Rasmus Hjortshoj © Rasmus Hjortshoj © Rasmus Hjortshoj + 18

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Frederiksberg, Denmark
  • Architects: Bjarke Ingels Group
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area: 2450.0
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year: 2019

CopenHill Energy Plant and Urban Recreation Center / BIG

© Laurian Ghinitoiu © Soren Aagaard © Rasmus Hjortshoj © Dragoer Luftfoto + 19

Copenhagen, Denmark
  • Architects: Bjarke Ingels Group
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area: 41000.0
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year: 2019

Spotlight: Bjarke Ingels

Danish architect Bjarke Ingels (born 2 October 1974) is often cited as one of the most inspirational architects of our time. At an age when many architects are just beginning to establish themselves in professional practice, Ingels has already won numerous competitions and achieved a level of critical acclaim (and fame) that is rare for new names in the industry. His work embodies a rare optimism that is simultaneously playful, practical, and immediately accessible.

Denmark Pavilion, Shanghai Expo 2010. Image © Iwan Baan VM Houses / BIG + JDS. Image Courtesy of BIG Danish National Maritime Museum. Image © Rasmus Hjortshõj 2016 Serpentine Pavilion. Image © Iwan Baan + 28

Lille Langebro Cycle and Pedestrian Bridge / WilkinsonEyre

© Rasmus Hjortshøj © Rasmus Hjortshøj © Rasmus Hjortshøj © Rasmus Hjortshøj + 31

Copenhagen, Denmark
  • Architects: WilkinsonEyre
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year: 2019

Public Spaces Aren't Really Available for Everyone

When we talk about public space, we often imagine a park with happy, relaxed people on a sunny day. In actuality, this is a very restricted approach. A young woman does not cross a deserted street at dawn in the same way as a white man wearing a suit or as an immigrant who may not be welcomed by local citizens. Have you ever felt discriminated while visiting a public space?

In this edition of Editors’ Talk, editors from Los Angeles, São Paulo, Argentina, and Uruguay share their views on defining public spaces for everyone

BIG's Vortex-Shaped Glasir College Opens in the Faroe Islands

Bjarke Ingels Group.'s vortex-shaped education center has opened in the Faroe Islands. The Glasir Tórshavn College combines three schools under one roof in an area of over 19,000 square meters. Made to celebrates the Faroese landscape, the project includes the Faroe Islands Gymnasium, Tórshavn Technical College and the Business College. The design features glass façades that are mounted in a sawtooth shingle to form the building's circular shape.

Glasir Tórshavn College. Image © Rasmus Hjortshoj Glasir Tórshavn College. Image © Rasmus Hjortshoj Glasir Tórshavn College. Image © Rasmus Hjortshoj Glasir Tórshavn College. Image © Rasmus Hjortshoj + 10

Game Streetmekka Aalborg / JAJA Architects

© Rasmus Hjortshoj © Rasmus Hjortshoj © Rasmus Hjortshoj © Rasmus Hjortshoj + 48

Aalborg, Denmark
  • Architects: JAJA Architects
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area: 2500.0
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year: 2018

Glasir Tórshavn College / BIG

© Rasmus Hjortshoj © Rasmus Hjortshoj © Rasmus Hjortshoj © Rasmus Hjortshoj + 35

Tórshavn, Faroe Islands
  • Architects: Bjarke Ingels Group
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area: 19200.0
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year: 2018

Camp Adventure Observation Tower / EFFEKT

© Rasmus Hjortshoj © Rasmus Hjortshoj © Rasmus Hjortshoj © Rasmus Hjortshoj + 34

  • Architects: EFFEKT
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year: 2019

100 Public Spaces: From Tiny Squares to Urban Parks

© DuoCai Photograph
© DuoCai Photograph

© Gianluca Stefani © Thomas Zaar © Tomasz Zakrzewski © Sebastien Michelini + 112

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The key to successfully designing or recovering public spaces is to achieve a series of ingredients that enhance their use as meeting places. Regardless of their scale, some important tips are designing for people's needs, the human scale, a mix of uses, multifunctionality and flexibility, comfort and safety, and integration to the urban fabric.

To give you some ideas on how to design urban furniture, bus stops, lookouts, bridges, playgrounds, squares, sports spaces, small parks and urban parks, check out these 100 notable public spaces.