Fernando Guerra | FG+SG

Fernando Guerra has been a pioneer in the way architecture is photographed and divulged. Fifteen years ago, he opened studio FG+SG together with his brother, and both are responsible in large part for the diffusion of Portuguese contemporary architecture in the last fifteen years.

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Lydia Residence / Driss Kettani

© Fernando Guerra | FG+SG© Fernando Guerra | FG+SG© Fernando Guerra | FG+SG© Fernando Guerra | FG+SG+ 15

Casablanca, Morocco

Avenida Novas Loft / João Tiago Aguiar Arquitectos

© Fernando Guerra | FG+SG© Fernando Guerra | FG+SG© Fernando Guerra | FG+SG© Fernando Guerra | FG+SG+ 48

Red House / extrastudio

© Fernando Guerra | FG+SG© Fernando Guerra | FG+SG© Fernando Guerra | FG+SG© Fernando Guerra | FG+SG+ 33

Setúbal, Portugal
  • Architects: extrastudio
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area:  360
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2016

Alcôa Pastry / Contacto Atlântico

© Fernando Guerra | FG+SG© Fernando Guerra | FG+SG© Fernando Guerra | FG+SG© Fernando Guerra | FG+SG+ 12

Evaluating Buildings: 12 Green Building Certifications to Know

The Brundtland Report, 1987 - "Our Common Future" - introduced the notion that the sustainable use of natural resources must "meet the needs of the present generation without affecting the ability of future generations to meet theirs." Since then, the term sustainability has been popularized and, often, trivialized in our daily lives. In the construction industry, this is no different. As much as we know that to build, we need to destroy, how is it possible to mitigate the effects of construction during the useful life and demolition of buildings? A sustainable building, in its design, construction, and operation, must reduce or eliminate negative effects overall and may even generate net positive impacts on the climate and environment – preserving resources and improving the quality of life of the occupants simultaneously. To say that a building is sustainable is easy and even seductive. But what exactly makes sustainable construction?

Answering this question is not a simple exercise. That is why, in the last 30 years, several building sustainability certifications have been created. Through outsourced and impartial evaluations from different sources, they aim to verify the sustainable aspects of any construction. Each of them addresses particular building elements and is typically focused on certain regions of the world. While there are some certifications that verify whether the building meets certain efficiency criteria, others create different classifications, assigning a score based on these evaluations. Below, we list some of the primary sustainability certifications around the world – ranked alphabetically – and include their main architectural applications alongside a brief explanation:

Treetop Walk / Carlos Castanheira

© Fernando Guerra | FG+SG© Fernando Guerra | FG+SG© Fernando Guerra | FG+SG© Fernando Guerra | FG+SG+ 74

Barrocas Pavilion / Carlos Castanheira

© Fernando Guerra FG+SG© Fernando Guerra FG+SG© Fernando Guerra FG+SG© Fernando Guerra FG+SG+ 17

  • Architects: Carlos Castanheira
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area:  436
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2019

CGD Gramado Garden / Alex Hanazaki Paisagismo

© Fernando Guerra | FG+SG© Fernando Guerra | FG+SG© Fernando Guerra | FG+SG© Fernando Guerra | FG+SG+ 38

  • Landscape Architects: Hanazaki Paisagismo
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area:  32291 ft²
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2018

Expansion of Barrocas House / Carlos Castanheira

© Fernando Guerra | FG+SG© Fernando Guerra | FG+SG© Fernando Guerra | FG+SG© Fernando Guerra | FG+SG+ 26

  • Architects: Carlos Castanheira
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area:  150
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2017

House AD25 / João Tiago Aguiar Arquitectos

© Fernando Guerra | FG+SG© Fernando Guerra | FG+SG© Fernando Guerra | FG+SG© Fernando Guerra | FG+SG+ 59

GC House / FCC Arquitectura

© Fernando Guerra | FG+SG© Fernando Guerra | FG+SG© Fernando Guerra | FG+SG© Fernando Guerra | FG+SG+ 50

Medical-Esthetical Clinic “Corporación Dermoestética” / Humberto Conde

© Fernando Guerra |  FG+SG© Fernando Guerra |  FG+SG© Fernando Guerra |  FG+SG© Fernando Guerra |  FG+SG+ 14

  • Architects: Humberto Conde
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area:  573
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2011

Refurbishment of Cabido Facilities / Carlos Castanheira & Clara Bastai

© Fernando Guerra | FG+SG© Fernando Guerra | FG+SG© Fernando Guerra | FG+SG© Fernando Guerra | FG+SG+ 42

House Quinta do Buraco III / Carlos Castanheira + Clara Bastai

© Fernando Guerra | FG+SG© Fernando Guerra | FG+SG© Fernando Guerra | FG+SG© Fernando Guerra | FG+SG+ 56

Architecture of the Afterlife: Crypts, Tombs and Mausoleums

Mortality defines both architecture and human experience. Throughout time, funerary structures have been designed across societies and civilizations to ground personal and shared beliefs. The idea of the afterlife shapes how these buildings are made, from symbolic monuments to vast tombs and crypts. Now a new range of modern architecture has been designed for remembrance and reflection.

© Paul Crosby Photography© David Frutos Ruiz© Gianluca Gelmini© Jonathan Hadiprawira+ 15

Restelo House / João Tiago Aguiar Arquitectos

© Fernando Guerra |  FG+SG© Fernando Guerra |  FG+SG© Fernando Guerra |  FG+SG© Fernando Guerra |  FG+SG+ 32

  • Area Area of this architecture project Area:  225
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2016
  • Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project
    Manufacturers: CIN, PADIMAT, A. Moreira Cadete, CLIMAR