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Obelisks by Álvaro Siza and Alison and Peter Smithson Re-Erected in Rural England

06:30 - 3 May, 2016
Obelisks by Álvaro Siza and Alison and Peter Smithson Re-Erected in Rural England, 'Obelisk' / Alison and Peter Smithson. Image © James Morris
'Obelisk' / Alison and Peter Smithson. Image © James Morris

Two sculptures—Obelisk by Alison and Peter Smithson and Columns by Álvaro Siza Vieira—have been re-erected in Shatwell, a "semi-derelict agricultural complex" located in rural England. The instatement of the monuments form a part of an evolving programme of installations which Drawing Matter, an organisation founded by Niall Hobhouse "that champions the process of architecture through collecting, archiving and commissioning," will use to explore the relationship between architecture, sculpture and landscape.

Grafton Architects See Off "Stellar Competition" to Design the LSE's New Paul Marshall Building

07:00 - 21 April, 2016
Grafton Architects See Off "Stellar Competition" to Design the LSE's New Paul Marshall Building, Interior Perspective. Image © Grafton Architects
Interior Perspective. Image © Grafton Architects

Dublin-based Grafton Architects, who last year were awarded the Jane Drew Prize, have seen off competition from the likes of Herzog & de Meuron and David Chipperfield Architects to win the contest to design the London School of Economics’ (LSE) £100 million ($144 million) Paul Marshall Building. The new center will house the academic departments of Accounting, Finance and Management and research centres, including the Marshall Institute, with teaching facilities as well as new multipurpose sports and arts facilities. Grafton Architects are reportedly "absolutely delighted to be given this opportunity to build in this unique location in Lincoln's Inn Fields, across from the wonderful Sir John Soane’s Museum, for a visionary client such as LSE."

Coup De Grâce

04:00 - 19 April, 2016
Coup De Grâce, City of London. Image © Jason Hawkes
City of London. Image © Jason Hawkes

The following article was first published by Volume Magazine in their 47th issue, The System*. You can read the Editorial of this issue, How Much Does Your System Weigh?here.

Neoliberal post-fordism poses a dramatic challenge to urbanism as we have come to know it since the early 20th century. The public planning process has become more and more an embarrassment and obstacle to urban and economic flourishing. It’s a relic of a bygone era. The high point of urban planning was the post-war era of socialist planning and re-construction of the built environment. With respect to this period we can speak about physical or perhaps ‘positive planning’, in the sense of governments formulating concrete plans and designs about what to build. This era has long gone as society evolved beyond the simple fordist society of mechanical mass production to our current post-fordist networked society. When a few basic standards were functionally separate, optimized and endlessly repeated, central planning could still cope with the pace of societal progress. The world we live in today is far too multi-faceted, complex and dynamic to be entrusted to a central planning agency. The old model broke apart as it could not handle the level of complexity we live with and our cities should accommodate. The decentralized information processing mechanism of the market was indeed capable of managing such levels of complexity and, for this reason, has effectively taken over all positive decision-making processes.

Monocle 24 Explores Women in Architecture

08:00 - 16 April, 2016
Monocle 24 Explores Women in Architecture, Heydar Aliyev Center / Zaha Hadid Architects. Image © Hufton + Crow
Heydar Aliyev Center / Zaha Hadid Architects. Image © Hufton + Crow

Following the death of Zaha Hadid on March 31st of this year Section DMonocle 24's weekly review of design, architecture and craft, hones in on the role of women in architecture and design. They discuss why, despite an almost 50:50 gender split in undergraduate architecture courses, women are still grossly underrepresented at senior levels within the profession by featuring conversations with two leading female architects, Angela Brady OBE and Amanda Levete. The episode also looks back over the lives of some of architecture's overlooked heroines.

In Residence: Ian Simpson in Manchester's Beetham Tower

04:00 - 1 April, 2016

In the latest installation of NOWNESS’ In Residence series, British architect Ian Simpson describes how was told by his careers teacher "not to set [his] sights too high" when he decided that he wanted to become an Architect. Here, he discusses the design intentions behind his home – the tallest residence in the United Kingdom's second city: Manchester. For Simpson, "home is [only] forty seconds away by lift."

© Nowness © Nowness © Nowness © Nowness +7

Zaha Hadid Dies Aged 65

11:20 - 31 March, 2016
Zaha Hadid Dies Aged 65, Dame Zaha Hadid, DBE (1950-2016). Image © Steve Double
Dame Zaha Hadid, DBE (1950-2016). Image © Steve Double

The Iraqi-born British Architect Dame Zaha Hadid, DBE (1950-2016) has died aged 65, in Miami, Florida. According to reports from the BBC, Hadid was being treated in hospital for bronchitis when she suffered a heart attack. Earlier this year she became the first sole woman to receive the RIBA Royal Gold Medal at a ceremony in London.

Read on for the official statement from Zaha Hadid Architects: 

One Resident's Argument to Save London's Central Hill Housing Estate

04:30 - 28 March, 2016

London's Central Hill housing estate, located in Brockwell Park (South London) and designed by Edward ('Ted') Hollamby is, like many 1960s schemes of its ilk, under threat of demolition. In this short film by British filmmaker Joe Gilbert, the estate is viewed through the narration of a long-term resident, Clifford Grant, who discusses its history and argues for its future security.

Exhibition at 2016 Venice Biennale to Highlight Scotland’s Position as an Emerging Northern Economic Area

09:30 - 26 March, 2016
© Lateral North
© Lateral North

Scotland, a country within the United Kingdom, will be showcasing a projected entitled Prospect North at the forthcoming Venice Biennale. Curated collaboratively between the Scottish Government, Architecture and Design Scotland, Creative Scotland,and the British Council Scotland, the installation will be designed by Lateral North, Dualchas Architects, and Soluis. As reported by the Architects' Journal, the show is set to examine "Scotland’s relationship with its northern neighbours" by focusing "on people and place, [and] looking at how communities from the Northern Isles of Orkney to the central belt of Scotland are using grassroot action."

Tintagel Castle Bridge Competition Won by Ney & Partners and William Matthews Associates

14:00 - 25 March, 2016
Tintagel Castle Bridge Competition Won by Ney & Partners and William Matthews Associates, Proposal: Ney & Partners Civil Engineers with William Matthews Associates, Ettwein Bridges, Waagner Biro, Ramboll and Jackson Coles LLP.. Image © MRC/Emily Whitfield-Wicks
Proposal: Ney & Partners Civil Engineers with William Matthews Associates, Ettwein Bridges, Waagner Biro, Ramboll and Jackson Coles LLP.. Image © MRC/Emily Whitfield-Wicks

English Heritage has announced that a team of Ney & Partners and UK-based William Matthews Associates has won the Tintagel Castle Bridge Design Competition. Chosen from a shortlist of 6 proposals, from among 136 entries, the winning design was selected by the majority of the jury. 

The site of Tintagel Castle is one of English Heritage’s most spectacular, attracting over 200,000 visitors annually. It is “inextricably linked to the legend of King Arthur and has been prized throughout history for its elemental qualities and spirit of place within this area of outstanding natural beauty.” The new bridge is commissioned for approximately £4 million and will stand 28m higher than the current crossing.

Monocle 24 Investigates Gardens and the Public Life of Plants

09:30 - 24 March, 2016
Monocle 24 Investigates Gardens and the Public Life of Plants, Heatherwick Studio's proposed Garden Bridge scheme across the River Thames, London. Image Courtesy of Arup
Heatherwick Studio's proposed Garden Bridge scheme across the River Thames, London. Image Courtesy of Arup

This edition of Section DMonocle 24's weekly review of design, architecture and craft, is dedicated to plants and gardens and specifically their role in architecture, urban life, and the design of the workplace. The episode considers the history of London’s urban greenery and the role of plants in landscape architecture touching upon, in conversation with Sam Jacob, the latest in London's green infrastructure: Heatherwick Studio's proposed Garden Bridge across the River Thames. It also traces the lineage of semi-private squares in Georgian London to Ebenezer Howard's Garden City movement in the late 19th and early 20th centuries – all approaches discussing how best to unite the built environment with the natural world.

Between the Kaleidoscopic Present and the Uncertain Future: A Case for Temporary Architecture

04:00 - 8 March, 2016
Plastique Fantastique: Sound of Light placed an inflatable structure into a 19th century music pavilion in Hamm, Germany in 2014. Image © RIBA Publications
Plastique Fantastique: Sound of Light placed an inflatable structure into a 19th century music pavilion in Hamm, Germany in 2014. Image © RIBA Publications

Temporary architecture is often misrepresented as a flimsy trend or photo-ready quick fix: easy, entertaining and often, mistakenly, cheap. This is Temporary concerns itself with a group of young, emerging, socially minded group of architects and designers who are taking the city back into their own hands and creating experimental sites for interaction and engagement. These architects, collectives, students and artists are designing transient structures, situations and events that invest and embed themselves in a community, public space or set of ideas.

Read an excerpt from the book This is Temporary after the break.

Call for Entries: AIA UK Excellence in Design Awards

05:05 - 4 March, 2016
Call for Entries: AIA UK Excellence in Design Awards

For over 20 years the American Institute of Architects UK Chapter 'Excellence in Design Awards' programme has proven highly valued by architects as they confer trans-Atlantic recognition for design excellence. Professional entries are sought from architects, industrial designers, urban planners, landscape architects and interior designers based in Britain, and from around the world for completed projects in the UK.

Sam Jacob Studio to Create a Russian Doll-Like Installation at London's Sto Werkstatt

04:00 - 3 March, 2016
Sam Jacob Studio to Create a Russian Doll-Like Installation at London's Sto Werkstatt, One Thing After Another. Image © Sam Jacob Studio
One Thing After Another. Image © Sam Jacob Studio

Sto Werkstatt have announced that Sam Jacob Studio will be creating "a unique installation" for their London gallery space that will "explore the exchange of information between digital and physical worlds." Entitled One Thing After Another, the project has its origins with what Jacob considers the most mundane, yet essential form, of architecture: the garden shed. The structure will be 3D-scanned to create a digital copy which will then be processed and scaled to fabricate a new CNC’d version from Verolith, a lightweight type of volcanic stone made of 90% perlite.

Monocle 24's 'The Urbanist' Investigates the Legacy of Victorian London

06:00 - 25 February, 2016
Monocle 24's 'The Urbanist' Investigates the Legacy of Victorian London, © Gareth Williams
© Gareth Williams

For this edition of The UrbanistMonocle 24's weekly "guide to making better cities," the team head back in time to explore London in 1891, examining some of the city’s achievements to get a glimpse of what life was like in the British capital. They investigate the architectural legacy of Victorian London, see how the introduction of the railway changed the city, and chat about Charles Booth’s pioneering study into Victorian Londoners’ quality of life. They also take a tour around the country’s first council estate.

Call for Works: Drawing Futures

07:00 - 22 February, 2016
Call for Works: Drawing Futures

Drawing Futures, a new the international peer-reviewed conference on speculative drawing for art and architecture has launched a call for works.

The two-day conference will bring together some of the world’s leading practitioners in drawing for conversations about the contemporary cutting-edge and future directions using drawing as a critical tool for art and architecture.

Carmody Groarke Selected to Design Cliff-Top Hotel Retreat on UK's South Coast

12:00 - 15 February, 2016
Carmody Groarke Selected to Design Cliff-Top Hotel Retreat on UK's South Coast, © Carmody Groarke
© Carmody Groarke

London-based firm Carmody Groarke has been selected to design a standalone hotel suite on Burgh Island, a tidal island on the South Devon coast. Commissioned by Burgh Island Ltd, the owners of the site's eponymous Grade-II listed art deco hotel, the new standalone "Pool House" suite sits atop the island's cliffs offering customers generous views of the Bantham Estuary and the hotel’s Mermaid Pool, an outdoor seawater pool and private beach for hotel guests.

Call for Entries: Museum of London West Smithfield International Design Competition

12:00 - 11 February, 2016
Call for Entries: Museum of London West Smithfield International Design Competition

The Museum of London and Malcolm Reading Consultants have launched an international search for an outstanding architect or team of architects to create a new building for the museum at West Smithfield in the City of London. The project at the heart of the two-stage design competition has a £130-150m construction budget, and is focused on regenerating a nationally-significant landmark and creating new contemporary galleries within a group of historic buildings on the West Smithfield site. The Museum of London is one of the top ten museums and galleries in the UK capital and responsible for the world’s largest archaeological archive, which currently holds six million artefacts.

Damien Hirst is Extending His Historic London Home – Downwards

04:00 - 11 February, 2016
Damien Hirst is Extending His Historic London Home – Downwards, Hanover Terrace, London (designed by Sir John Nash) of which Hirst owns a portion
Hanover Terrace, London (designed by Sir John Nash) of which Hirst owns a portion

Damien Hirst has outgrown his 14-bedroom, nineteenth century London home. As reported by Hyperallergic, Hirst is in the process of enlarging his villa – downwards. In the spirit of the London 'super-basement' trend, for which the Royal Boroughs of Kensington and Chelsea first took opposition to in 2014, the Turner Prize-winning artist's plans appear to be some of the most ambitious yet. The proposed subterranean warren of rooms—including a sauna, a steam room, a cargo elevator leading to a double height "art room", and an 82-foot long swimming pool—will all be excavated from his half-acre back garden. Although the plans have faced local opposition the artist's "lair", designed by Purcell, is now set for construction.