ArchDaily | Broadcasting Architecture Worldwidethe world's most visited architecture website
i

Sign up now and start saving and organizing your favorite architecture projects and photos

i

Find the most inspiring products for your projects in our Product Catalog.

i

Get the ArchDaily Chrome Extension and be inspired with every new tab. Install here »

AD Classics: Empire State Building / Shreve, Lamb and Harmon

04:00 - 5 December, 2016
AD Classics: Empire State Building / Shreve, Lamb and Harmon, (2005). Image © Wikimedia user robertpaulyoung (licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0)
(2005). Image © Wikimedia user robertpaulyoung (licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0)

Even in Manhattan—a sea of skyscrapers—the Empire State Building towers over its neighbours. Since its completion in 1931 it has been one of the most iconic architectural landmarks in the United States, standing as the tallest structure in the world until the Twin Towers of the World Trade Center were constructed in Downtown Manhattan four decades later. Its construction in the early years of the Great Depression, employing thousands of workers and requiring vast material resources, was driven by more than commercial interest: the Empire State Building was to be a monument to the audacity of the United States of America, “a land which reached for the sky with its feet on the ground.”[1]

Image via Wikimedia (Public Domain). ImageLaying of the tower's foundations The pinnacle of the tower. Image © Wikimedia user David Corby (licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0) Image via Wikimedia (Public Domain). ImageUnder construction Image via Wikimedia (Public Domain). ImageUnder construction +6

Vista Manhattan: Views from New York City's Finest Residences

13:30 - 16 November, 2016
Vista Manhattan: Views from New York City's Finest Residences, Courtesy of Unknown
Courtesy of Unknown

These 200 images show you the spectacular views from hundreds of New York City’s finest residences. Everyone loves an amazing view, and some pay millions for a property with views across Central Park, the East River, the Hudson River, or the Midtown skyline. In the jungle of glass, stone, and steel that is New York City, it is impossible to overstate the value of an incredible view. Tauber, a Manhattan-based independent photographer, shot these images over the last decade while shooting New York City’s finest properties for real estate firms, architects, interior designers, developers, and magazines.

Studio Seilern Architects Unveils Plans for Skyscraper in Manhattan's Art Quarter

08:00 - 9 November, 2016
Studio Seilern Architects Unveils Plans for Skyscraper in Manhattan's Art Quarter , Courtesy of Studio Seilern Architects (SSA)
Courtesy of Studio Seilern Architects (SSA)

Studio Seilern Architects (SSA) has unveiled its design for a new skyscraper in New York, located on the riverfront of the Hudson River, which will offer views to the South West towards the river and Hoboken, as well as to the East towards the Empire State Building and Manhattan skyline. 

The 16.107 square meter building (24 floors) will feature commercial units in the form of a gallery in the plinth—which is reduced to form a sculpture garden—at the lower levels, while upper levels will contain residential units.

Courtesy of Studio Seilern Architects (SSA) Courtesy of Studio Seilern Architects (SSA) Courtesy of Studio Seilern Architects (SSA) Courtesy of Studio Seilern Architects (SSA) +7

New York's Future Second Tallest Tower Breaks Ground

14:10 - 18 October, 2016

The Kohn Pedersen Fox-designed One Vanderbilt Avenue broke ground today, beginning construction on what will stand as the second tallest tower in New York City upon completion. Located adjacent to Grand Central Terminal on 42nd Street, the tower will be integrated into the its neighbor through a series of underground connections and $220 million in improvements to Grand Central’s infrastructure.

Courtesy of SL Green Realty Corp Courtesy of SL Green Realty Corp Courtesy of SL Green Realty Corp Courtesy of SL Green Realty Corp +36

Heatherwick Studio's "Vessel" Will Take the Form of an Endless Stairway at New York's Hudson Yards

12:30 - 15 September, 2016
Heatherwick Studio's "Vessel" Will Take the Form of an Endless Stairway at New York's Hudson Yards, Interior View of the Vessel. Image Courtesy of Forbes Massie-Heatherwick Studio
Interior View of the Vessel. Image Courtesy of Forbes Massie-Heatherwick Studio

UPDATE: We've added a video of Thomas Heatherwick explaining the design of "Vessel," after the break!

Thomas Heatherwick is bringing a new public monument to New York City. Today, Heatherwick Studio revealed the first renderings of “Vessel,” a 15-story tall occupiable sculpture comprised of 154 intricately interconnecting flights of stairs that will serve as the centerpiece of the new Hudson Yards development in west Manhattan.

View of the Special Events Plaza. Image Courtesy of VisualHouse-NelsonByrdWoltz Upper Level View Through the Vessel. Image Courtesy of Forbes Massie-Heatherwick Studio View of the Public Square and Gardens Looking South from 33rd St.. Image Courtesy of Forbes Massie-Heatherwick Studio View of the Pavilion Grove. Image Courtesy of VisualHouse-NelsonByrdWoltz +5

AD Classics: Radio City Music Hall / Edward Durell Stone & Donald Deskey

04:00 - 29 July, 2016
AD Classics: Radio City Music Hall / Edward Durell Stone & Donald Deskey, Courtesy of Flickr user Erik Drost
Courtesy of Flickr user Erik Drost

Upon opening its doors for the first time on a rainy winter’s night in 1932, the Radio City Music Hall in Manhattan was proclaimed so extraordinarily beautiful as to need no performers at all. The first built component of the massive Rockefeller Center, the Music Hall has been the world’s largest indoor theater for over eighty years. With its elegant Art Deco interiors and complex stage machinery, the theater defied tradition to set a new standard for modern entertainment venues that remains to this day.

Courtesy of Flickr user Ed Schipul Courtesy of Flickr user Roger Courtesy of Flickr user Steve Huang Courtesy of Flickr user Mattia Panciroli +10

Sharing Models: Manhattanisms

16:00 - 23 June, 2016
Sharing Models: Manhattanisms

July 15th – September 2nd, 2016

July 14th Exhibition Opening
6 – 7 pm: Press and Members Preview [RSVP]
7 – 9 pm: Public Opening [RSVP]

We are experiencing the emergence of a culture that is marked by a return to, redefinition, and expansion of the notion of the commons. The increasing complexity and interconnectedness of globalization is reorienting us away from trends that have emphasized individuation and singular development, and toward new forms of collectivity.

Over the last decade, emerging technologies and economies have affected aspects of our everyday life, from the way we work and travel, to how we

SHoP Unveils Design for New Skyscraper in Manhattan's Lower East Side

16:00 - 28 April, 2016
SHoP Unveils Design for New Skyscraper in Manhattan's Lower East Side, Courtesy of SHoP
Courtesy of SHoP

SHoP has unveiled the design for a new 900 foot tall skyscraper in Manhattan’s Lower East Side. The 77 story, 500,000 square foot, mixed-income tower will have 600 units, 150 of which will be permanently affordable and distributed evenly throughout the building. The project has been developed as a collaboration between SHoP and JDS who are co-owners of the development, with the partnership of two not-for-profit groups: Two Bridges Neighborhood Council (TBNC) and Settlement Housing Fund (SHF).

Bjarke Ingels on Sculptural Skyscrapers and Refining Parameters in High Rise Design

07:30 - 18 April, 2016

In an interview with the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH), Bjarke Ingels reflects on the design of skyscrapers, noting how "sculpture is fine, but if its arbitrary it's not as interesting." Architects, Ingels argues, have the problem of "skilled incompetence:" the notion that they "already know the answer before [they've] even heard the question." This prevents them "from questioning the question, or having the question rephrased, or elaborating on the question, or even listening for the question – because [they] already know the answer."

OMA to Realize First Manhattan Building with Toll Brothers

16:00 - 15 April, 2016
OMA to Realize First Manhattan Building with Toll Brothers, © Flickr User: Daniel Chong Kah Fui דניאל 張家輝  licensed under CC BY-NC-ND 2.0
© Flickr User: Daniel Chong Kah Fui דניאל 張家輝 licensed under CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

OMA's first building in Manhattan will be a condo project at 122 East 23rd Street, built in collaboration with Toll Brothers City Living. Designed by OMA's New York principal Shohei Shigematsu, the residential tower culminates a decade leading the office and several previous attempts to realize a project in the region.

Heatherwick's Pier 55 Green-Lighted by New York Supreme Court

17:01 - 14 April, 2016
Heatherwick's Pier 55 Green-Lighted by New York Supreme Court , Pier 55.. Image ©  Pier55, Inc. and Heatherwick Studio, Renders by Luxigon
Pier 55.. Image © Pier55, Inc. and Heatherwick Studio, Renders by Luxigon

Pier 55, the floating park designed by Heatherwick Studio and landscape architecture firm, Signe Nielsen, received a green-light from the New York Supreme Court this past Friday, April 8, according to a report by the Architect’s Newspaper. Floating above the Hudson River on the Lower West Side of Manhattan, the park is anchored by an aggregation of enormous petal-like stilts that are submerged in the water below. The park is being funded by the philanthropy of Diane von Furstenberg and her husband Barry Diller.

Pier 55’s legal troubles began last spring when the non-profit, City Club of New York filed a lawsuit against Pier55 Inc. and Hudson River Park Trust (HRPT) to stop the project.

How the MetLife Building Redefined Midtown Manhattan

09:30 - 16 March, 2016
How the MetLife Building Redefined Midtown Manhattan, © Wikimedia user Jnn13 licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0
© Wikimedia user Jnn13 licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0

Recently the subject of a competition to reimagine its expansive facade, the MetLife building is one of Manhattan's most noticeable - and hated - buildings. In this article originally published on 6sqft as "Great Game Changers: How the MetLife Building Redefined Midtown Architecture," Carter B Horsley tells the tale of how the building came to be.

Perhaps the most detested midtown skyscraper by the public, this huge tower has, nevertheless, always been a popular building with tenants for its prime location over Grand Central Terminal and its many views up and down Park Avenue. It is also one of the world’s finest examples of the Brutalist architecture, commendable for its robust form and excellent public spaces, as well as its excellent integration into the elevated arterial roads around it.

However, it is also immensely bulky and its height monstrous. As shown in the photograph ahead, the building completely dominates and overshadows the former New York Central Building immediately to the north, which had been designed by Warren & Wetmore as part of the “Terminal City” complex. The New York Central Building, now known as the Helmsley Building, straddled the avenue with remarkable grace and its distinguished pyramid. As one of the city’s very rare, “drive-through” buildings, it was the great centerpiece of Park Avenue. But by shrouding such a masterpiece in its shadows, quite literally, the Pan Am Building (today the MetLife building) desecrated a major icon of the city that will unfortunately will never recover from this contemptible slight on such a prominent site.

With the Opening of the WTC Transportation Hub, Has Santiago Calatrava Been Vindicated?

09:30 - 4 March, 2016
With the Opening of the WTC Transportation Hub, Has Santiago Calatrava Been Vindicated?, via WTC Progress
via WTC Progress

After 12 long years and a series of construction headaches, Santiago Calatrava’s $4 billion World Trade Center Transportation Hub has finally opened to the public. Once widely regarded as a symbol of hope for post-9/11 New York, the project’s ballooning budget and security-related revisions gradually soured the opinions of the public and top design minds including Michael Graves and Peter Eisenman, and provoked a multitude of mocking nicknames ranging from “Calatrasaurus” to “squat hedgehog” to “kitsch dinosaur.” All the while, Calatrava urged critics to reserve their opinion until the project’s opening. Now that day has arrived - did Calatrava receive the vindication he was insistent would come? Read on for the critics’ takes.

SOM Unveils Manhattan West Development Plans

08:00 - 1 February, 2016
SOM Unveils Manhattan West Development Plans, Courtesy of SOM
Courtesy of SOM

Skidmore, Owings & Merrill (SOM) has released the plans for Manhattan West, a new office and residential development spanning five million square feet over the 2.6-acre platform that covers the active rail tracks connecting Penn Station to New Jersey and Upstate New York.

A First Look at Álvaro Siza's First US Building

16:00 - 26 January, 2016
A First Look at Álvaro Siza's First US Building, Courtesy of Noe & Associates and The Boundary; Via The Architects' Newspaper
Courtesy of Noe & Associates and The Boundary; Via The Architects' Newspaper

An image of Álvaro Siza's first US building has been released. The luxury New York tower, planned for the corner of West 56th Street and Eleventh Avenue in Midtown, will rise up to 120 meters (just over 400 feet) and offer 80 units, a private roof garden, sun deck, spa and fitness center, and more. 

Siza is working with real estate development firms Sumaida + Khurana and LENY on the project. Sumaida + Khurana is the same developer who is collaborating with Tadao Ando on a luxury condominium at 152 Elizabeth Street

Maya Lin Designs Urban Mansion in New York

14:00 - 22 January, 2016
Maya Lin Designs Urban Mansion in New York, © Maya Lin Studio/Bialosky + Partners Architects via Tribeca Trib
© Maya Lin Studio/Bialosky + Partners Architects via Tribeca Trib

Maya Lin has been commissioned to design a 20,000-square-feet urban mansion in New York's Tribeca neighborhood. The five-story proposal, seen first on Tribeca Trib, aims to replace a 1980s mixed-use building on 11 Hubert Street. If approved, the of metal, glass and limestone building would rise 70-feet and house five bedrooms, 11 bathrooms, a dog room, wine closet, screening room, landscaped courtyard, 5,000-square-foot fitness center, basement, garage and more. 

COOKFOX Wins Preservation Approval for Manhattan Condominium

14:00 - 28 December, 2015
COOKFOX Wins Preservation Approval for Manhattan Condominium, South. Image © COOKFOX Architects
South. Image © COOKFOX Architects

The New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission has approved COOKFOX Architect's plans for a mid-rise, 66-unit condominium building in Manhattan. Planned for two parcels of land in the West End Collegiate Historic District, next to one of the Churches' five ministries, the project aims to "fit harmoniously with the distinct streetscape" while "interweaving the rich historic details of the Upper West Side with subtle contemporary and sustainable design."

Mark Foster Gage's Manhattan Skyscraper Takes Gothic Architecture to New Heights

13:30 - 15 December, 2015
Mark Foster Gage's Manhattan Skyscraper Takes Gothic Architecture to New Heights, © Mark Foster Gage Architects
© Mark Foster Gage Architects

This isn't your typical New York skyscraper; Mark Foster Gage has been commissioned to design a 1492-foot-tall luxury tower in Manhattan - 41 West 57th Street. Described by Skyscraper City as the "missing link between Beaux Arts, Art Deco, Expressionism, Gaudi-Modernisme and Contemporary architecture," the outlandish design boasts a uniquely carved facade cloaked in balconies custom tailored for each of its 91 residential units. 

"I think that many of the supertall buildings being built in New York City are virtually free of architectural design - they are just tall boxes covered in a selected glass curtain wall products. That is not design," said Gage.