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Manhattan

Loop NYC Wants to Bring Driverless Expressways and Green Corridors to Manhattan

08:00 - 31 July, 2017

Manhattan-based architecture practice Edg has created an ambitious proposal that replaces major highways into driverless ones, as well as adding green corridors spanning the length of the island. Named “Loop NYC,” the scheme aims to improve Manhattanites' quality of life and reduce the city’s urban pollution. Edg has released a video outlining the proposal and its uses (see above)—read on for the project breakdown.

© Edg © Edg © Edg © Edg +12

NYC Underwater: Video Imagines the Consequences of a Two-Degree Temperature Rise

09:30 - 9 June, 2017

James Hansen, professor of Earth and Environmental Sciences at Columbia University, former NASA scientist, and the planet’s preeminent climatologist, was among the first to sound the alarm on climate change during his 1988 testimony before Congress. Since then, he has continued to shine a light on the problem through lectures, interviews, TED talks, and his blog. He has warned that a mere 2-degree increase in temperature could result in a sea level rise of five to nine meters by the end of the century, flooding coastal cities and rendering them uninhabitable.

Inspired by Hansen, filmmakers Menilmonde have imagined Manhattan underwater. The French duo's previous videos experiment with subtle subversions of the world we experience, and their latest creation, 2°C New York City, is arguably their most powerful to date.

Courtesy of Menilmonde via screenshot from video Courtesy of Menilmonde via screenshot from video Courtesy of Menilmonde via screenshot from video Courtesy of Menilmonde via screenshot from video +4

A New Giant Sets Foot in NYC: Meganom’s Skyscraper Design Unveiled

16:30 - 1 June, 2017
A New Giant Sets Foot in NYC: Meganom’s Skyscraper Design Unveiled, Courtesy of Meganom
Courtesy of Meganom

Moscow-based architecture practice Meganom has unveiled their design for a supertall luxury skyscraper in Manhattan. The parcel, on 262 Fifth Avenue is located in the city’s NoMad neighborhood near Madison Square Park. The site owner, Israeli developer Boris Kuzinez from Five Points Development, submitted plans for the project in September 2016. Kuzinez and Meganom have previously worked together on several projects, including the award-winning Tsvetnoy Central Market in Moscow. 262 Fifth Avenue will be the debut project in the U.S. for both, and the skyscraper will be the tallest ever built by a Russian architect in America. 

Courtesy of Meganom Courtesy of Meganom Courtesy of Meganom Courtesy of Meganom +5

New Renderings Reveal Herzog & de Meuron’s Nearly Completed Hotel Tower in Manhattan

06:00 - 18 May, 2017
New Renderings Reveal Herzog & de Meuron’s Nearly Completed Hotel Tower in Manhattan, Courtesy of Ian Schrager Company
Courtesy of Ian Schrager Company

New renderings of Herzog & de Meuron’s upcoming luxury hotel have been released, showing the 28-storey tower’s updated interiors at its location at 215 Chrystie Street in Manhattan’s Bowery District. Constructed of raw concrete, the 370 rooms are capped with eleven open-plan luxury residences and is set to open to the public in June.

“To introduce a sense of scale and to further foster the expression of each individual floor, each column is slightly inclined,” explained Jacques Herzog with the announcement of the project back in 2014. “The prominent corner of the building facing Chrystie Street is where the two geometries of the inclined columns meet. Rather than giving one direction priority, the two directions are braided together. The result is a sculptural corner column that becomes the visual anchor for the entire building.”

Courtesy of Ian Schrager Company Courtesy of Ian Schrager Company Courtesy of Ian Schrager Company Courtesy of Ian Schrager Company +6

Watch Construction Begin on Heatherwick's Vessel at Hudson Yards

12:00 - 24 April, 2017

Construction has officially begun on Vessel, the 15-story tall staircase sculpture designed by Heatherwick Studio that will serve as the centerpiece of New York’s massive new Hudson Yards development. To build the structure, 75 individual units are being prefabricated by Cimolai S.p.A. in their Monfalcone, Italy facility, then shipped to New York where they will be assembled on site. These first 10 of these pieces have now completed their 15-day overseas journey, with the remaining pieces scheduled to arrive on-site and put into place over the coming year.

Outdoor assembly at Cimolai's Monfalcone facility. Image © Related-Oxford The first piece in transit. Image © Related-Oxford Stephen Ross and Thomas Heatherwick on the 3rd Level of the Vessel in Monfalcone, Italy. Image © Related-Oxford Assembly at the Monfalcone Workshop. Image © Related-Oxford +16

Construction Halted on Heatherwick's Pier 55 in New York

08:00 - 27 March, 2017
Construction Halted on Heatherwick's Pier 55 in New York, © Heatherwick Studio via Curbed
© Heatherwick Studio via Curbed

Construction on Heatherwick Studio’s undulating Pier 55 in New York has come to a screeching halt, following a ruling by a United States District Court judge last week that will require the project to undergo an intense wildlife impact review.

Last April, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers gave the project, located on the Hudson River in West Chelsea, the go-ahead, allowing initial construction to begin. But the district judge found that the Army Corps of Engineers had failed to properly consider the wide effects of the projects on the river wildlife.

Inside Philip Johnson's Underappreciated Glass House in Manhattan

09:30 - 25 March, 2017

The architectural legacy of the Rockefeller family in Manhattan is well-known, most obviously demonstrated in the slab-like Art Deco towers of the Rockefeller Center and the ever-expanding campus of the MoMA. But in a city that is filled with landmarks and historic buildings, it's easy for even the most remarkable projects to go unrecognized. Philip Johnson's Rockefeller Guest House in Manhattan was completed in 1950, just one year after the construction of his better known Glass House in New Canaan. The Glass House is an obvious cousin to the later guest house: both feature largely empty glass and steel boxlike forms, where structural work is exposed and celebrated.

Zaha Hadid Architects Reveals Designs for Supertall Mixed-Use Skyscraper in New York

11:30 - 22 March, 2017
Zaha Hadid Architects Reveals Designs for Supertall Mixed-Use Skyscraper in New York , © Zaha Hadid Architects/Kushner Companies
© Zaha Hadid Architects/Kushner Companies

A 1,400-foot-tall mixed-use skyscraper by Zaha Hadid Architects may be the next supertall structure to hit midtown Manhattan. Located at 666 Fifth Avenue between 52nd and 53rd Street, the project is the brainchild of Kushner Properties, who currently co-own the existing 483-foot-tall building with Vornado Realty Trust.

Estimated to cost up to $12 billion, the company is currently negotiating a multi-billion dollar deal with Chinese holding company Anbang Insurance Group to finance the project. If plans to buy out the building go through, Kushner would be in the clear to begin construction on the ZHA-designed tower, which would rebrand the property as 660 Fifth Avenue and offer 464,000-square-feet of residential space, an 11-story hotel, and a 9-story retail podium.

"The Big Bend" Imagines the World's Longest Skyscraper for Billionaires' Row in NYC

16:20 - 20 March, 2017
"The Big Bend" Imagines the World's Longest Skyscraper for Billionaires' Row in NYC, © ioannis Oikonomou – oiio architecture studio
© ioannis Oikonomou – oiio architecture studio

In 2014, midtown Manhattan received its first supertall (taller than 1,000 feet) residential building, Christian de Portzamparc’s One57. The following year, Rafael Viñoly Architects’ 432 Park Avenue surpassed the mark, confirming the trend of sky-shattering, pencil-thin skyscrapers rising along Central Park’s southern edge. In all, at least 10 supertall projects have been planned for the neighborhood, earning it the nickname of Billionaire’s Row.

Responding to this phenomenon, architect Ioannis Oikonomou of oiio architecture studio has proposed an alternate solution, called “The Big Bend,” that asks the question: “What if our buildings were long instead of tall?”

© ioannis Oikonomou – oiio architecture studio © ioannis Oikonomou – oiio architecture studio © ioannis Oikonomou – oiio architecture studio © ioannis Oikonomou – oiio architecture studio +21

Introducing GSAPP Conversations' Inaugural Episode: "Exhibition Models"

09:30 - 24 February, 2017
Introducing GSAPP Conversations' Inaugural Episode: "Exhibition Models"

We are pleased to announce a new content partnership between ArchDaily and Columbia University's Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation (GSAPP) in New York City.

GSAPP Conversations is a podcast series designed to offer a window onto the expanding field of contemporary architectural practice. Each episode pivots around discussions on current projects, research, and obsessions of a diverse group of invited guests at Columbia, from both emerging and well-established practices. Usually hosted by the Dean of the GSAPP, Amale Andraos, the conversations also feature the school’s influential faculty and alumni and give students the opportunity to engage architects on issues of concern to the next generation.

Tadao Ando's First NYC Residence Tops Out in Nolita

12:00 - 18 February, 2017
Tadao Ando's First NYC Residence Tops Out in Nolita, © The Boundary and Noë & Associates
© The Boundary and Noë & Associates

Tadao Ando’s first residential building in New York City—152 Elizabeth—has topped out in Manhattan’s Nolita neighborhood. A collaboration with architect and designer Michael Gabellini of Gabellini Sheppard Associates, as well as developer Sumaida + Khurana, the project will feature Ando’s hallmarks, poured-in-place concrete, burnished, metal, voluminous glass, and a living green wall.

Conceived as an inner sanctuary within downtown Manhattan, the building highlights acoustics as a key consideration, with a façade system and exterior glass enabling a high OITC rating to “ensure a tranquil home environment in the center of this vibrant neighborhood.”

© The Boundary and Noë & Associates © The Boundary and Noë & Associates © The Boundary and Noë & Associates © Noë & Associates +5

The Unexpected Stories Behind 10 Skyscrapers That Were Actually Built

04:00 - 24 January, 2017
The Unexpected Stories Behind 10 Skyscrapers That Were Actually Built, Torre Velasca. Image © José Tomás Franco
Torre Velasca. Image © José Tomás Franco

As long as there have been buildings mankind has sought to construct its way to the heavens. From stone pyramids to steel skyscrapers, successive generations of designers have devised ever more innovative ways to push the vertical boundaries of architecture. Whether stone or steel, however, each attempt to reach unprecedented heights has represented a vast undertaking in terms of both materials and labor – and the more complex the project, the greater the chance for things to go awry.

Ryugyong Hotel. Image © José Tomás Franco Robot Building. Image © José Tomás Franco CCTV Headquarters. Image © José Tomás Franco Cayan Tower. Image © José Tomás Franco +21

AD Classics: Empire State Building / Shreve, Lamb and Harmon

04:00 - 5 December, 2016
AD Classics: Empire State Building / Shreve, Lamb and Harmon, (2005). Image © Wikimedia user robertpaulyoung (licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0)
(2005). Image © Wikimedia user robertpaulyoung (licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0)

Even in Manhattan—a sea of skyscrapers—the Empire State Building towers over its neighbours. Since its completion in 1931 it has been one of the most iconic architectural landmarks in the United States, standing as the tallest structure in the world until the Twin Towers of the World Trade Center were constructed in Downtown Manhattan four decades later. Its construction in the early years of the Great Depression, employing thousands of workers and requiring vast material resources, was driven by more than commercial interest: the Empire State Building was to be a monument to the audacity of the United States of America, “a land which reached for the sky with its feet on the ground.”[1]

Image via Wikimedia (Public Domain). ImageLaying of the tower's foundations The pinnacle of the tower. Image © Wikimedia user David Corby (licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0) Image via Wikimedia (Public Domain). ImageUnder construction Image via Wikimedia (Public Domain). ImageUnder construction +6

Vista Manhattan: Views from New York City's Finest Residences

13:30 - 16 November, 2016
Vista Manhattan: Views from New York City's Finest Residences, Courtesy of Unknown
Courtesy of Unknown

These 200 images show you the spectacular views from hundreds of New York City’s finest residences. Everyone loves an amazing view, and some pay millions for a property with views across Central Park, the East River, the Hudson River, or the Midtown skyline. In the jungle of glass, stone, and steel that is New York City, it is impossible to overstate the value of an incredible view. Tauber, a Manhattan-based independent photographer, shot these images over the last decade while shooting New York City’s finest properties for real estate firms, architects, interior designers, developers, and magazines.

Studio Seilern Architects Unveils Plans for Skyscraper in Manhattan's Art Quarter

08:00 - 9 November, 2016
Studio Seilern Architects Unveils Plans for Skyscraper in Manhattan's Art Quarter , Courtesy of Studio Seilern Architects (SSA)
Courtesy of Studio Seilern Architects (SSA)

Studio Seilern Architects (SSA) has unveiled its design for a new skyscraper in New York, located on the riverfront of the Hudson River, which will offer views to the South West towards the river and Hoboken, as well as to the East towards the Empire State Building and Manhattan skyline. 

The 16.107 square meter building (24 floors) will feature commercial units in the form of a gallery in the plinth—which is reduced to form a sculpture garden—at the lower levels, while upper levels will contain residential units.

Courtesy of Studio Seilern Architects (SSA) Courtesy of Studio Seilern Architects (SSA) Courtesy of Studio Seilern Architects (SSA) Courtesy of Studio Seilern Architects (SSA) +7

New York's Future Second Tallest Tower Breaks Ground

14:10 - 18 October, 2016

The Kohn Pedersen Fox-designed One Vanderbilt Avenue broke ground today, beginning construction on what will stand as the second tallest tower in New York City upon completion. Located adjacent to Grand Central Terminal on 42nd Street, the tower will be integrated into the its neighbor through a series of underground connections and $220 million in improvements to Grand Central’s infrastructure.

Courtesy of SL Green Realty Corp Courtesy of SL Green Realty Corp Courtesy of SL Green Realty Corp Courtesy of SL Green Realty Corp +36

Heatherwick Studio's "Vessel" Will Take the Form of an Endless Stairway at New York's Hudson Yards

12:30 - 15 September, 2016
Heatherwick Studio's "Vessel" Will Take the Form of an Endless Stairway at New York's Hudson Yards, Interior View of the Vessel. Image Courtesy of Forbes Massie-Heatherwick Studio
Interior View of the Vessel. Image Courtesy of Forbes Massie-Heatherwick Studio

UPDATE: We've added a video of Thomas Heatherwick explaining the design of "Vessel," after the break!

Thomas Heatherwick is bringing a new public monument to New York City. Today, Heatherwick Studio revealed the first renderings of “Vessel,” a 15-story tall occupiable sculpture comprised of 154 intricately interconnecting flights of stairs that will serve as the centerpiece of the new Hudson Yards development in west Manhattan.

View of the Special Events Plaza. Image Courtesy of VisualHouse-NelsonByrdWoltz Upper Level View Through the Vessel. Image Courtesy of Forbes Massie-Heatherwick Studio View of the Public Square and Gardens Looking South from 33rd St.. Image Courtesy of Forbes Massie-Heatherwick Studio View of the Pavilion Grove. Image Courtesy of VisualHouse-NelsonByrdWoltz +5

AD Classics: Radio City Music Hall / Edward Durell Stone & Donald Deskey

04:00 - 29 July, 2016
AD Classics: Radio City Music Hall / Edward Durell Stone & Donald Deskey, Courtesy of Flickr user Erik Drost
Courtesy of Flickr user Erik Drost

Upon opening its doors for the first time on a rainy winter’s night in 1932, the Radio City Music Hall in Manhattan was proclaimed so extraordinarily beautiful as to need no performers at all. The first built component of the massive Rockefeller Center, the Music Hall has been the world’s largest indoor theater for over eighty years. With its elegant Art Deco interiors and complex stage machinery, the theater defied tradition to set a new standard for modern entertainment venues that remains to this day.

Courtesy of Flickr user Ed Schipul Courtesy of Flickr user Roger Courtesy of Flickr user Steve Huang Courtesy of Flickr user Mattia Panciroli +10