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New Digital-Physical Building Block System Aims to Make 3D Modeling Accessible to Children

09:30 - 25 June, 2017

Modeling on the computer and physically building scale models are essential modes of iteration for the modern architecture studio. But what if this creative process of digital and physical ideation could be made accessible to everyone: children, hobbyists, and architects alike?

That is the question I set out to answer by designing an entirely new snapping block system, from the ground up, for the aesthetic and experiential expectations of the 21st century. It’s called Kible, and after putting architecture aside and developing it since November 2015, I’ve recently launched the product on Kickstarter.

Bring New York's Never-Built Projects to Life With This Kickstarter

10:30 - 22 May, 2017
Bring New York's Never-Built Projects to Life With This Kickstarter, Buckminster Fuller Dome, 1961. Image Courtesy of Metropolis Books
Buckminster Fuller Dome, 1961. Image Courtesy of Metropolis Books

The “Never Built” world so far includes Never Built Los Angeles, a book and exhibit, and the book, Never Built New York. Now, the Queens Museum hopes to continue the exploration into the New York that might have been with a Never Built New York exhibition and has launched a Kickstarter campaign with a goal of $35,000 to make it happen. The exhibition, curated by Sam Lubell and Greg Goldin and designed by Christian Wassmann, will explore 200 years of wild schemes and unbuilt projects that had the potential to vastly alter the New York we know today.

Howe and Lescaze MoMA. Image Courtesy of Metropolis Books Rufus Henry Gilbert's Elevated Railway. Image Courtesy of Metropolis Books Frank Gehry, Guggenheim Museum, 2000. Image Courtesy of Metropolis Books SHoP, Flushing Stadium, 2013. Image Courtesy of Metropolis Books +7

Crowdfunded Architecture Tourbooks Help You Discover Cities' Best Kept Secrets

06:00 - 10 May, 2017
Crowdfunded Architecture Tourbooks Help You Discover Cities' Best Kept Secrets, via Kickstarter. Courtesy of Virginia Duran.
via Kickstarter. Courtesy of Virginia Duran.

Cities have a wealth of experiences, landmarks and sights to offer the eager traveller, who despite their ambitions, may begin to feel overwhelmed under the weight of culture and geography that saturates their travels. It is easy to get lost not only during pilgrimages to iconic locations, but also in the number of places to go and things to see, guided on overpriced tours and by consumerist maps. But worry not, for a new Kickstarter campaign has been launched for the Architectour Guide – a hardcover curated compendium of key spots that’s got you covered during your next urban crawl.

“The guide is made for the urban explorer, an individual who loves discovering cities in a different way,” explains Virginia Duran, the London-based architect and urban planner responsible for the campaign. “Architectour Guide collects the best spaces of a city inspiring travelers to craft their trips in a unique way, making it easier for us to visit, understand and photograph each of these places. As a consequence, we travelers will be helping to keep buildings alive.”

via Kickstarter. Courtesy of Virginia Duran. Crowdfunded Architecture Tourbooks Help You Discover Cities' Best Kept Secrets via Kickstarter. Courtesy of Virginia Duran. via Kickstarter. Courtesy of Virginia Duran. +8

This Kickstarter Camera Mimics Human Eyesight

16:00 - 4 February, 2017
This Kickstarter Camera Mimics Human Eyesight, via Kickstarter. Courtesy of TwoEyes Tech
via Kickstarter. Courtesy of TwoEyes Tech

The team at TwoEyes Tech made up of HunJoo Song, SeonAh Kim, and Vivek Soni has launched a kickstarter campaign for its TwoEyes VR 360 camera, which is the first binocular 360-degree VR, 4K camera that mirrors human eye sight.

Using two pairs of 180-degree lenses that are placed 65 millimeters apart—the average distance between a person’s eyes—the camera captures 360-degree footage, “just like your natural eyes would view the world.” This footage can be uploaded to 360-degree-compatible social media platforms like YouTube 360, Facebook 360, and Twitter 360, or enjoyed through virtual reality binoculars or 3D television.

via Kickstarter. Courtesy of TwoEyes Tech via Kickstarter. Courtesy of TwoEyes Tech via Kickstarter. Courtesy of TwoEyes Tech via Kickstarter. Courtesy of TwoEyes Tech +5

Kickstarter Campaign Produces Large Affordable CNC Cutting Machine

08:00 - 4 November, 2016

Young tech team (Bar Smith, Hannah Teagle, and Tom Beckett) has launched a Kickstarter campaign for Maslow, a four-by-eight-foot at home CNC cutting machine made to assist construction efforts by cutting user-specified shapes out of wood or any other flat material. Designed to be affordable—at under $500—easy to use, inclusive, and powerful, the project aims to share designs digitally so that you can build on the work of others or create your own from scratch. 

Based on the design of the hanging plotter, Maslow “uses gear-reduced DC motors with encoders and a closed-loop feedback system to achieve high accuracy and high torque.”

Courtesy of Maslow CNC Courtesy of Maslow CNC Courtesy of Maslow CNC Courtesy of Maslow CNC +6

This Kickstarter Campaign is 3D Printing Tokyo in 100 Pieces

09:30 - 8 October, 2016

Have you ever wanted to look over an entire city from the comfort of your own desk? Do you have a sentimental relationship with the city of Tokyo? If you answered "yes" to these questions, iJet Inc, a 3D print solutions company, along with DMM.com Ltd, have launched a Kickstarter that might be for you.

One Hundred Tokyo is a project aiming to reproduce Tokyo’s urban landscape in the form of one hundred ten by ten centimeter 3D printed models. All of the data and equipment needed to gather visual information of the city has been provided by ZENRIN Co Ltd, who traveled around the landscape in specialized vehicles. The 3D models created by this process are then printed on 3DSystems printers, using gypsum powder that is coated in a special resin in order to harden, and then coated once again in resin paint to achieve the full-color skyline.

Courtesy of iJet Inc. Courtesy of iJet Inc. Courtesy of iJet Inc. Courtesy of iJet Inc. +4

Basildon's "Failed" New Town: What Happened When We Built Utopia?

09:30 - 17 September, 2016

We are all familiar with the "utopian" towns of the 20th Century. Basildon, Essex, was one of the largest of those New Towns. It was founded in 1949, when Lewis Silkin, the Minister of town and country planning at the time, ambitiously predicted that "Basildon will become a city which people from all over the world will want to visit. It will be a place where all classes of community can meet freely together on equal terms and enjoy common cultural recreational facilities."[1] Nearly seventy years later, Basildon is left with a struggling local economy, splintered communities, and a fraction of the art and culture than what was originally hoped for. "New Town Utopia" is a documentary film that confronts this concrete reality with a question: “What happened when we built Utopia?”

Basildon Fire Station. Image © <a href='http://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/261329'>Geograph user GaryReggae</a> licensed under <a href='http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/'>CC BY-SA 2.0</a> BasildonTown Square. Image © <a href='http://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/2575026'>Geograph user Stephen McKay</a> licensed under <a href='http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/'>CC BY-SA 2.0</a> Freedom House, Basildon. Image © <a href='http://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/261326'>Geograph user GaryReggae</a> licensed under <a href='http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/'>CC BY-SA 2.0</a> Bell Tower, St. Martin's Church, Basildon. Image © <a href='http://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/335962'>Geograph user Julieanne Savage</a> licensed under <a href='http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/'>CC BY-SA 2.0</a> +6

This Artist is Using Kickstarter to Fund a Floating Bridge to New York's Governor's Island

11:30 - 21 May, 2016

This article was originally published on Metropolis Magazine as "Citizen Bridge, NYC's First Floating Bridge, Reaches Kickstarter Goal."

Governors Island is a small, pedestrian-only island to the south of Manhattan and to the west of Brooklyn. It’s just across from Red Hook, the Brooklyn neighborhood known to many a Manhattanite as the home of New York’s only Ikea. To get there, you have to take the East River Ferry—that’s the only option. No subway, no bus, no rail. But it wasn’t always that way.

Nancy Nowacek is a Red Hook-based artist whose vision, since 2012, has been to create an alternative way to reach this backyard of New York City. She has always had a close relationship with the waterfront, but many, she suggests, do not.  “It’s really hard to get to the water’s edge from most points inland,” she says. “It’s not a part of the New York that the kids in my building...live in, nor many others who live a few miles away geographically, but experientially are a world away.”

The Strange Beauty of Soviet Sanatoria

04:00 - 31 March, 2016

Khoja Obi Garm is a Soviet sanatorium nestled high in the mountains of Tajikistan – a place known for its curative, radon-rich waters. When Maryam Omidi, a former journalist, visited in 2015 she was "blown away" by both the architecture and landscape: a enormous concrete, Brutalist block at the peak of a snow-capped mountain. She has since launched a Kickstarter campaign to develop a book of photographs exploring "the best sanatoriums" across the former Soviet Union.

© Dmitry Lookianov © Claudine Doury © Michal Solarski © Olya Ivanova +10

This Kickstarter Campaign Hopes to Fund a Coworking Space Specifically for Architects

09:30 - 27 February, 2016
This Kickstarter Campaign Hopes to Fund a Coworking Space Specifically for Architects, WeWork's South Lake Union office in Seattle. Spaces such as these have proved very popular for small businesses, but they don't exactly work for architects.. Image Courtesy of WeWork
WeWork's South Lake Union office in Seattle. Spaces such as these have proved very popular for small businesses, but they don't exactly work for architects.. Image Courtesy of WeWork

As part of the current "sharing economy" revolution, coworking facilities have transformed the creative marketplace. Since 2005, when the first coworking space was founded in San Francisco, the popularity of working in a shared environment has taken off. Today, hundreds of coworking facilities exist in cities of varying sizes across the world, supporting small businesses ranging from app developers to furniture makers to recording studios. But how have they grown so quickly? It’s all in the community. WeWork, which owns a number of coworking spaces worldwide, sums it up as “a place you join as an individual, ‘me,’ but where you become part of a greater ‘we.'”

Kickstarter Campaign to Fund the Forthcoming 'Real Review' Nears End

04:15 - 19 November, 2015

Tomorrow the Kickstarter campaign launched by the Real Estate Architecture Laboratory (REAL), which surpassed its funding target earlier this month, will come to an end. The Real Review, an independent bi-monthly magazine led by Jack Self and Shumi Bose which intends to "revive the review as a writing form" to a general readership within the architectural sphere, is slated for launch in early 2016. In an interview with ArchDaily, the editors stated that "the original crowdfunding target of $24,994 (or £15,990) was set at the [basic] cost of print." Having since surpassed their first goal by almost £10,000 to date, every new donation or subscription adds to the financial feasibility and longevity of the project. Following the announcement that Self, Bose and Finn Williams will be curating the British Pavilion at the 2016 Venice Biennale, a new reward was added to their campaign.

In Conversation With Jack Self and Shumi Bose, Editors of the 'Real Review'

04:00 - 4 November, 2015
In Conversation With Jack Self and Shumi Bose, Editors of the 'Real Review', Editors Jack Self and Shumi Bose, and designers Oliver Knight and Rory McGrath (OK-RM). Image © REAL
Editors Jack Self and Shumi Bose, and designers Oliver Knight and Rory McGrath (OK-RM). Image © REAL

Last month a Kickstarter campaign launched by the Real Estate Architecture Laboratory (REAL) reached its funding target: the Real Review, an independent bi-monthly magazine which intends to "revive the review as a writing form" to a general readership within the architectural sphere, will soon be a reality. ArchDaily sat down with editors Jack Self and Shumi Bose to discuss how the project came into being and what this—the flagship publication of REAL—will look like when its first issue is published in early 2016.

"It's Just the Beginning" — 'Real Review' Kickstarter Campaign Hits Milestone

04:55 - 19 October, 2015
"It's Just the Beginning" — 'Real Review' Kickstarter Campaign Hits Milestone, Editors Jack Self and Shumi Bose, and designers Oliver Knight and Rory McGrath (OK-RM). Image © REAL
Editors Jack Self and Shumi Bose, and designers Oliver Knight and Rory McGrath (OK-RM). Image © REAL

A Kickstarter campaign recently launched by Jack Self and Shumi Bose of the Real Estate Architecture Laboratory (REAL) has reached its funding target in only twenty days. Produced by an independent team of editors and designers, this bi-monthly magazine intends to "revive the review as a writing form" to a general readership within the architectural sphere and its orbital subjects, with a particular focus on politics and economics. Their campaign has so far seen considerable support from the architectural community and beyond — testament to their 'no-ads policy' and dedication to paying their contributors.

In a statement to those who have pledged so far, the editors have said that "the Real Review will happen, and it is directly and completely due to your commitment, your vision and your generosity. We can’t thank you enough for getting us here!" They are now looking to surpass this crowdfunded milestone, with Kickstarter remaining the only way to subscribe.

Kickstarter by New-Territories M4 Addresses New Forms of Ownership in Architecture

08:00 - 11 October, 2015
Kickstarter by New-Territories M4 Addresses New Forms of Ownership in Architecture, Courtesy of New-Territories M4
Courtesy of New-Territories M4

New-Territories/ M4 has launched a Kickstarter campaign to fund MMYST, a hybrid architecture project that combines a hotel with a manufactured habitat for Swiftlets, a bird native to Thailand. Located in Krabi, the building will be used almost exclusively by backers of the project and will be set for removal in 10 years. In order to be realized, the project requires $200,000 in funding before October 25, 2015. Read more about this experimental project after the break.

ArchDaily Readers on the Role of Crowdfunding in Architecture

08:30 - 3 October, 2015
ArchDaily Readers on the Role of Crowdfunding in Architecture, Courtesy of BIG-Bjarke Ingels Group
Courtesy of BIG-Bjarke Ingels Group

Over time, people have found many different ways to fund the construction of a building. Museums for example have long benefited from the support of deep-pocketed patrons, with The Broad Museum, a permanent public home for the renowned contemporary art collection of philanthropists Edythe and Eli Broad, being the newest example in a long history of such practices. However in our ever-more-connected world - and against a backdrop of reduced government support for creative endeavors - the onus of funding seems to be shifting once again, away from the individual and towards the crowd.

As crowdfunding makes strides in all realms of innovative enterprise, including architecture, we wanted to hear from our readers about what they thought of this new opportunity for a publicly held stake in what has historically been the realm of singular, well-heeled organizations in the form of the state or private capital. Writing about the history and current trajectories of public funding, alongside a more pointed discussion of BIG’s Kickstarter for “the world’s first steam ring generator,” we posed the question: does public funding have a place in architecture, and if so, is there a line that should be drawn?

Read on for some of the best replies.

Kickstarter Campaign Launches to Fund the Forthcoming 'Real Review'

11:25 - 29 September, 2015

The Real Estate Architecture Laboratory (REAL) have today announced a Kickstarter campaign in preparation for the launch of their flagship publication, the Real Review. Produced by an independent team of editors and designers, this bi-monthly magazine intends to "revive the review as a writing form" to a general readership within the architectural sphere and its orbital subjects.

The Real Review will be "a printed object of exceptional quality, featuring engaging texts by leading international commentators," alongside providing "a highly visible platform for emerging writers." Confirmed authors at this time include, among others, Assemble, Pier Vittorio Aureli (Dogma, AA), Reinier de Graaf (OMA), Sam Jacob (Sam Jacob Studio), and a rostra of journalists including the Financial Times' architecture critic Edwin Heathcote.

Help Recreate and Replace Frank Lloyd Wright's San Francisco Call Building Model at Taliesin

14:00 - 6 September, 2015
Help Recreate and Replace Frank Lloyd Wright's San Francisco Call Building Model at Taliesin, via Organic Architecture + Design Archives
via Organic Architecture + Design Archives

After a sale of the Frank Lloyd Wright Archives in 2013, Frank Lloyd Wright's model of The San Francisco Call Building, originally residing at Taliesin and later, Hillside Home School, was moved to the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA). The Organic Architecture and Design Archives, Inc. (OAD) believes that this model - a striking 8-foot tall replica built originally for the 1940 MoMA Exhibition - was "an integral part of the design of Taliesin."

What Role Does Crowdfunding Have in Architecture?

08:00 - 24 August, 2015
What Role Does Crowdfunding Have in Architecture?, The Pedestal at the Statue of Liberty is an early example of an architecture crowdfunding campaign. Image © Flickr CC user Joao Carlos Medau
The Pedestal at the Statue of Liberty is an early example of an architecture crowdfunding campaign. Image © Flickr CC user Joao Carlos Medau

In 1885, with only $3,000 in the bank, the "American Committee" in charge of building a pedestal for the Statue of Liberty ceased work, after both president Grover Cleveland and the US Congress declined to provide funds for the project. The project was saved by a certain Joseph Pulitzer, publisher of the New York World, who used his newspaper to spark a $100,000 fundraising campaign with the promise that everyone who donated would have their name printed the paper.

The base of the Statue of Liberty is perhaps the first ever example of crowdfunding in architecture as we might recognize it today, with a popular media campaign and some form of minor reward. But in recent years, crowdfunding has taken on a whole new complexion. Last week, we asked our readers to tell us their thoughts about a specific example of crowdfunding in architecture: BIG's attempt to raise funds for the prototyping of the steam ring generator on their waste-to-energy plant in Copenhagen. But there are many more examples of fundraising in architecture, and each of them deserves attention.