Video: First Look Inside Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partner’s “Cheesegrater”

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In a short film for The Guardian Lead Architect and Partner of Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners, , tours Robert Booth around the almost-complete Leadenhall Building. The building is referred to as a relative of it’s neighbour, Lloyds of London, which was completed by Richard Rogers‘s practice in 1986. Leadenhall, dubbed the “Cheesegrater” due to its angled façade, is twice the height of Lloyds and is considered to be the physical manifestation of the evolution of Rogers’ architectural and tectonic language. Although less “structurally showy” than its counterpart, the building is still unconventionally bold when it comes to structural expression.

Arup Engineers Explain: How the MoMA PS1 YAP Winners Grew Ten Thousand Mushroom Bricks

This year’s ′s Young Architects Program opens tomorrow (you can see the schedule of events here). Find out how the innovative winning design (a tower of fungal bricks), by The Living‘s , was tested and built with this article, originally posted on  as “Engineering a mushroom tower“. Soft, spongy, and delicious on pizza, mushrooms have approximately as much to do with structural engineering as alligators or lawnmowers. Or so we thought, until architect David Benjamin of New York firm The Living walked into our offices with a brick grown from fungi. This brick was the key to his concept for an entry to MoMA PS1’s Young Architects Program competition. Every year, the museum commissions a designer to build a centerpiece for its popular outdoor Warm Up concert series. If architectural design competitions are where brave, innovative ideas rise to the top, The Living’s mushroom tower (official name: Hy-Fi) checked all the right boxes. In addition to the novelty factor, mushroom bricks offer a host of sustainability benefits. The raw materials needed to produce them — mushrooms and corn stalks (waste material from farms) that the spores feed on — are as eco-friendly as they come. Bricks can be grown in just five days, and the process produces no waste or carbon emissions. When the structure is taken down at the end of the summer, they can be composted and turned into fertilizer.

The Dutch Royal Picture Gallery at The Hague to Reopen Following Extensive Renovation

Courtesy of Mauritshuis, . Image © Ronald Tilleman

The Mauritshuis, a Dutch 17th century city palace in The Hague, will reopen this week following a large scale renovation and extension designed by Hans van Heeswijk with servicing and fire undertaken by Arup. Similar to Amsterdam’s Rijksmuseum, which reopened after a ten year restoration and remodelling in 2013, the Mauritshuis Royal Picture Gallery exhibits one of the finest collections of Dutch Golden Age paintings including Johannes Vermeer’s Girl With a Pearl Earring. Alongside a large scale renovation, Hans van Heeswijk have also extended the galleries with new exhibition spaces, an auditorium and educational spaces.

Arup’s Latest Solar Panels Produce Energy From Algae

A view behind the BIQ House Solarleaf panels. Image via GOOD. Image

Architects have been experimenting with the potential of building envelopes for years. Now, Arup has an interesting, Zumtobel Group Award-nominated proposal: the Solarleaf bioreactor. This thin, 2.5 x .07 meter panel, when attached to the exterior of a building, is capable of generating biofuel – in the form of algae – for the production of hot water. More efficient than electricity and more sustainable than wood, algae is ideal kindling for producing heat, especially since it can be grown on-site. Moreover, the water in which the algae grows also collects solar energy, providing an additional supply of heat. More details on this sustainable innovation, after the break. 

Arup Develops 3D Printing Technique for Structural Steel

© David de Jong

A team lead by Arup has developed a method of designing and 3D Printing  joints which will significantly reduce the time and cost needed to make complex nodes in tensile structures. Their research is being touted as “a whole new direction for the use of additive manufacturing” which provides a way of taking “firmly into the realm of real-world, hard hat construction.”

Aside from creating more elegant components which express the forces within each individual joint - as you can see in the above photo – the innovation could potentially reduce costs, cut waste and slash the carbon footprint of the construction sector.

Read on for more on this breakthrough

Designing for Sound In Our Everyday Spaces

The syn chron space by Carsten Nicolai was designed to combine experiences of sound and light. Image Courtesy of artcentron.com

In this interesting article in the New York Times, Allison Arieff highlights the often unconsidered importance of sound in architecture (outside of theaters and museums at least). She profiles the work of Acoustic at ARUP who have begun to work inschools and hospitals, taking into account the effects poor sound environments can have on us in our everyday lives. You can read the full article here.

Rogers Stirk Harbour Unveils Design for Venezuela’s National Football Stadium

Courtesy of RSHP

Following our recent news that confirmed Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners (RSHP) will oversee the design and construction of two new within Caracas’ Hugo Chavez Park, details have emerged regarding the Estadio Nacional de Fútbol de Venezuela. Designed by RSHP, in collaboration with Arup and Schlaich Bergermann und Partners, the project will be the practice’s first ever football stadium.

Arup to Collaborate with Henning Larsen on European Spallation Source

© Luxigon

Arup has been selected “to contribute expertise” in the design of the European Spallation Source Research Centre (ESS) in Lund, Sweden. They will collaborate with Henning Larsen Architects, who was selected to design the state-of-the-art facility earlier this yearThe ESS will become the world’s largest and most advanced research facility for neutron-based research once it is fully operational in 2025. Alongside enabling scientists to see and understand atomic and molecular structures and movements, it will also be based on the world’s most powerful neutron source – a 600m long accelerator which fires neutrons at different types of material in order that they can be analyzed in enormous detail. Learn more about ESS and its design here

Iwan Baan on Light and the Louvre Lens

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Most architects are familiar with the work of , the eminent photographer who has documented some of the most famous buildings of our time. But what you may not know is that Baan had not originally intended to photograph architecture. Had it not been for a chance meeting with Rem Koolhaas, things may have turned out quite differently. 

In the video above, Baan speaks with ERCO at the Louvre Lens, a -designed offshoot of the Paris Louvre located in a small mining town in the north of France. As he traipses around the museum’s campus, he speaks about everything from his approach to photography (one that is less wrapped up in architecture than you might think) to the importance and transformative properties of light . 

White Arkitekter Wins FAR ROC Design Competition

View from Pier. Image © White Arkitekter

Stockholm-based White Arkitekter, along with partners ARUP and Gensler, has been announced as the winner of the two-phase “For a Resilient Rockaway” (FAR ROC) design competition in New York. Selected from a shortlist of four and an international pool of 117, White Arkitekter’s “untraditional” proposal aims to transform an 80-acre shoreline site in into a resilient and affordable community through a series of small interventions that can be tested, adjusted, or redesigned overtime during the development process.

Three Arup Specialists Share Their Vision of The Future of Healthcare Design

Laguna Honda Hospital, San Francisco. Image © David Wakely Photography

This interview was originally posted on Arup Connect and titled “Global perspectives on the future of healthcare design“.

In the last few decades, rapid advances in both medical and consumer technologies have created revolutionary possibilities for every aspect of healthcare, from prevention to diagnosis to treatment and beyond. From DNA-based preventative care to digital appointments with doctors thousands of miles away, the future holds enormous potential for improving longevity and quality of life for people around the world.

These dynamics present significant challenges for designers working to shape a built environment that will meet healthcare needs both today and in the future. We spoke with Arup experts from around the globe — Phil Nedin, who heads the firm’s global healthcare business from London; Bill Scrantom, the Los Angeles-based healthcare leader for North and South America; and Katie Wood, who recently relocated from Australia to Toronto to build the Canadian practice — to learn more.

UNStudio Envisions Giant Observation Wheel in Japan

Courtesy of UNStudio

Consider a social-networking experience that combines real-time amusement with an awareness of your surroundings. Dutch architecture firm, UNStudio, together with of Japan, have laid out a colossal vision that expects to attract millions of visitors to a mixed-use retail, food and beverage center anchored by an architecturally-iconic observation wheel, Nippon Moon. The concept utilizes a user’s smart phone or tablet, extending the rider’s experience far beyond the moment they physically enter one of the 32 single or double-decker capsules.

BIG Shortlisted In Competition to Design Denmark’s Largest Hospital

© BIG

UPDATE: All three shortlisted teams have been announced. Check out there proposals here

BIG, WHR and Arup have been shortlisted alongside two design teams to participate in the second phase of the design competition for what will be Denmark’s largest hospital. The 124,000 square meter facility, known as the Nyt Hospital Nordsjælland, is planned to be built north of Copenhagen.

According to the jury, “BIG’s ideas, together with the large green spaces and green surfaces, mean that we really can talk about a healing hospital in the best possible interpretation of the concept.”

We will keep you updated as details of the other shortlisted teams emerge.

Chinese Developer Plans to Build Crystal Palace Replica in London

The Crystal Palace at Sydenham Hill, 1854. Photo by Philip Henry Delamotte © Wikimedia Commons

Shanghai-based developer ZhongRong Holdings is working with on an ambitious proposal to reconstruct Joseph Paxton’s Crystal Palace in . Originally built to house the Great Exhibition of 1851, the 80,000 square-meter cast iron and glass structure was relocated from Hyde Park to south-east in 1854 where it was ultimately destroyed by fire in 1936.

Arup Documentary: Traces of Peter Rice

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Peter Rice has been described as both one of the best and architects of the twentieth century. Unhappy with the role that play in designing buildings, Rice dedicated his life to championing brave innovation and poetry through structure in a way that helped bridge the gap between and architecture. His desire to work in tandem with architects, towards a shared vision, made him one of the most in-demand of the twentieth century.

Read more about this amazing man and check out the video after the break…

Ashgabat Olympic Complex Proposal / Arup

© Polimeks

Developed by Arup and built to international sports federation standards, the  Olympic Complex in the heart of Turkmenistan will be one of the largest building projects on which has delivered the ‘total’ design and includes 750,000 square meters of sports and social buildings. Having just signed the contract for phase two of the project, which will add an aquatics center, indoor athletics arena, and a tennis center, the venues also include a velodrome, training halls, hotels, offices, a medical center and media facilities. More images and their description after the break.

Light Matters: What Media Facades Are Saying

© Patrick Bingham-Hall

Light matters, a monthly column on light and space, is written by Thomas Schielke. Based in Germany, he is fascinated by architectural , has published numerous articles and co-authored the book „Light Perspectives“. 

Today we have permanent media façade installations worldwide that call for attention. With size, tempo, colour and brightness they stand up as individuals within the urban nightscape. Many of them send out their luminous messages in a broadcast mode. For this reason, neighbours, on occasion, demand an intense dialogue with regard to content and form of the media façade, especially as it’s often unclear whether light installations are architecture or advertisement.

However, in the same way a good book requires a storyteller, demand curators to arrange exciting stories that fit into the site and suit the client. The following four examples show how reflect the story of the buildings themselves – see them all, after the break…

Serpentine Gallery Pavilion 2002 / Toyo Ito + Cecil Balmond + Arup

© Sylvain Deleu

Architects: Toyo Ito, Cecil Balmond, Arup
Location: Kensington Gardens, London,
Area: 309.76 sqm
Year: 2002
Photographs: Sylvain Deleu

Toyo Itorecipient of the Pritzker Prize 2013, along with Cecil Balmond and Arup were in charge of the design of the Serpentine Gallery Pavilion back in 2002. What appeared to be an extremely complex random pattern was in fact derived from an algorithm of a cube that expanded as it rotated. The intersecting lines formed different triangles and trapezoids, whose transparency and translucency gave a sense of infinitely repeated motion.

You can see more images of the Serpentine Gallery Pavilion 2002 after the break. And don’t forget to check ArchDaily’s exclusive coverage of the 2013 Pritzker Prize.