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Experience Casa Caldera in this Breathtaking Video Narrated by the Architects

09:30 - 14 May, 2016

Located in the arid desert of the San Rafael Valley, ArizonaCasa Caldera by DUST is a unique object in the vast landscape. In this video, architects Jesus Robles and Cade Hayes explain their project as viewers are taken on a vivid tour of the building and site. The camera moves through the desert, unveiling the house gradually, as one would truly experience it.

“One of the unique things about Casa Caldera is the experience of the approach,” Hayes says. “Two hours of travel are actually part of the experience of arriving. It isn’t until you are 20, 30 feet from the house that you get a good look.”

Zaha Hadid's Interiors for One Thousand Museum in Miami

17:45 - 13 May, 2016
Zaha Hadid's Interiors for One Thousand Museum in Miami, Courtesy of Zaha Hadid Architects
Courtesy of Zaha Hadid Architects

One Thousand Museum, the Zaha Hadid-designed skyscraper in Downtown Miami, has unveiled new interior renderings, including communal spaces designed by the architect. The 62-story tower, which began construction in December of 2014, will contain only 83 residences, consisting of a two-story duplex penthouse, four townhouses, eight full-floor residences, and 70 half-floor units. Overlooking the Pérez Art Museum by Herzog & deMeuron, the soon-to-be-completed Patricia and Phillip Frost Museum of Science by Grimshaw Architects, and the American Airlines Arena by HOK & Arquitectonica, One Thousand Museum tilts the scales in luxury residences from a market historically centered on Miami Beach to Miami’s rapidly densifying Downtown.

Courtesy of Zaha Hadid Architects Courtesy of Zaha Hadid Architects Courtesy of Zaha Hadid Architects Courtesy of Zaha Hadid Architects +24

At Kunstmuseum Basel, iart Creates a Frieze with a Technological Twist

09:30 - 13 May, 2016

Though it was once an essential element of all classical structures, the frieze has largely been left behind by architects looking for contemporary façade systems. But at the recently-opened addition to the Kunstmuseum Basel, designed by Swiss architects Christ & Gantenbein in collaboration with design group iart, the frieze returns with an eye-catching, technological twist, as hidden pixels within the facade light up to display moving images and text to those below.

© Derek Li Wan Po, Basel © Derek Li Wan Po, Basel © Derek Li Wan Po, Basel © Derek Li Wan Po, Basel +15

OMA Partner Reinier de Graaf on the Social Dimension of Luxury Housing at Holland Green

16:50 - 12 May, 2016
OMA Partner Reinier de Graaf on the Social Dimension of Luxury Housing at Holland Green, © Nick Gutteridge
© Nick Gutteridge

This week, OMA has unveiled their latest project in London, Holland Green. Working alongside Allies & Morrison, the firm has created three new luxury residential buildings on a site of significant cultural importance: the former home of the Commonwealth Institute, designed by Sir Robert Matthew, one of the founding partners of RMJM. As a result, OMA and Allies & Morrison’s Holland Green project involved much more than just adding fuel to the fire of London’s booming luxury residential market—it also involved an extensive conversion to the original 1962 Commonwealth Institute exhibition hall, funded through the scheme’s profitable residential offering, to prepare the heritage building for its new tenants the Design Museum.

ArchDaily spoke with Reinier de Graaf, the partner in charge of the project at OMA, to discuss the development’s social aspirations, the challenges of the London context, and the story behind the project.

© Philip Vile © Sebastian van Damme © Philip Vile © Sebastian van Damme +12

15 Architects Who Have Been Immortalized on Money

09:30 - 12 May, 2016

In terms of memorialization, being selected to represent your country as the face of a banknote is one of the highest honors you can achieve. Even if electronic transfer seems to be the way of the future, cash remains the reliable standard for exchange of goods and services, so being pasted to the front of a bill guarantees people will see your face on a near-daily basis, ensuring your legacy carries on.

In some countries, the names of the faces even become slang terms for the bills themselves. While “counting Le Corbusiers” doesn’t quite roll off the tongue, a select few architects have still been lucky enough to have been featured on such banknotes in recent history. Read on to find out who the 15 architects immortalized in currency are and what they’re worth.

Steven Holl Designs a New Visual Arts Building for Franklin & Marshall College

12:30 - 11 May, 2016
Steven Holl Designs a New Visual Arts Building for Franklin & Marshall College, Exterior, Day View. Image Courtesy of Steven Holl Architects
Exterior, Day View. Image Courtesy of Steven Holl Architects

Steven Holl Architects has been commissioned by Franklin & Marshall College, in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, for a new Visual Arts Building and Quad, promoting a future for the arts on the campus. Inspired by the trees that will surround the building, Holl calls the project a “pavilion on the park,” in a design compared to a kite in the trees. The project was announced by President Daniel R. Porterfield during F&M’s commencement on May 7, after Holl and Senior Partner Chris McVoy presented their concept to the College Board of Trustees two days prior.

Project of the Month: Colorado Outward Bound Micro Cabins

09:30 - 11 May, 2016
Project of the Month: Colorado Outward Bound Micro Cabins, © Jesse Kuroiwa
© Jesse Kuroiwa

The process of carrying out a project from start to finish includes many different variables, from determining the users' needs to figuring out how best to set up the work site. The latter are an important part of determining the project logistics as well as its design criteria. Colorado Outward Bound Micro Cabins emphasize this process, using a planning logic that takes into account the design of a minimally-sized living unit under extreme conditions as well as the execution of the assembly in a short time and in a place of difficult access.

5 Reasons to Add Virtual Reality to Your Workflow

09:30 - 10 May, 2016
5 Reasons to Add Virtual Reality to Your Workflow, © Halfpoint via Shutterstock
© Halfpoint via Shutterstock

This article was originally published on ArchSmarter titled "5 Ways Virtual Reality Will Change Architecture."

Micro-Apartments: Are Expanding Tables and Folding Furniture a Solution to Inequality?

04:00 - 10 May, 2016
Micro-Apartments: Are Expanding Tables and Folding Furniture a Solution to Inequality?, Carmel Place, New York City. Courtesy of nARCHITECTS. Image © Field Condition
Carmel Place, New York City. Courtesy of nARCHITECTS. Image © Field Condition

This opinion-piece is a response to Nick Axel’s essay Cloud Urbanism: Towards a Redistribution of Spatial Value, published on ArchDaily as part of our partnership with Volume.

In his recent article, Nick Axel puts forward a compelling argument for the (re)distribution of city-space according to use value: kickball trophies and absentee owners out, efficient use of space in. Distributing urban space according to use certainly makes sense. Along with unoccupied luxury condos that are nothing more than assets to the 1% and mostly empty vacation apartments, expelling (rarely accessed) back-closets to the suburbs frees more of the limited space in cities for people to actually live in.

“Reporting from the Front” in China: A Talk with Zhang Ke of ZAO/standardarchitecture

09:30 - 9 May, 2016
“Reporting from the Front” in China: A Talk with Zhang Ke of ZAO/standardarchitecture, © SU Shengliang. ImageMicro Yuan’er
© SU Shengliang. ImageMicro Yuan’er

As an architect, no matter how much support you have got, you always feel you are fighting by yourself. – Zhang Ke

AD Classics: Bergisel Ski Jump / Zaha Hadid Architects

04:00 - 9 May, 2016
AD Classics: Bergisel Ski Jump / Zaha Hadid Architects, © Helene Binet
© Helene Binet

Situated on the peak of Bergisel Mountain above the picturesque alpine city of Innsbruck, Austria, the Bergisel Ski Jump represents the contemporary incarnation of a historic landmark. Designed by Zaha Hadid between 1999 and 2002, the Ski Jump is a study in formal expression: its sweeping lines and minimalist aesthetic create a sense of graceful, high-speed motion, reflecting the dynamic sensation of a ski jump in a monumental structure that stands above the historic center of Innsbruck and the mountain slopes around.

© Helene Binet © Zaha Hadid Architects © Zaha Hadid Architects © Helene Binet +27

Brutalism and Culture: How St Peter's Seminary is Already Shining in its Second Life

09:30 - 8 May, 2016
Brutalism and Culture: How St Peter's Seminary is Already Shining in its Second Life, Built in 1966, St. Peter’s Seminary is hidden away in a forest 20 miles outside Glasgow. Image Courtesy of Courtesy Tom Kidd / Almay via Metropolis Magazine
Built in 1966, St. Peter’s Seminary is hidden away in a forest 20 miles outside Glasgow. Image Courtesy of Courtesy Tom Kidd / Almay via Metropolis Magazine

Gillespie, Kidd & Coia's celebrated St Peter's Seminary—once voted Scotland's best modern building—has for too long been a victim of fate, left to decay after it was abandoned just 20 years after its completion. Fortunately, plans are well underway to restore the building. This article, originally published by Metropolis Magazine as "Ruin Revived," explains how even in its ruined state, the dramatic brutalist structure is already showing its value as a cultural destination.

Modernist architecture, it used to be said, was inadequate because the machined materials of modern buildings wouldn’t lend themselves well to picturesque ruination. What, minus the taut skins of glass and plaster, could these stark, boxlike carcasses possibly communicate to future generations?

St. Peter’s Seminary in Cardross, Scotland, is a forceful rejoinder to that jibe. Built in 1966 and abandoned 20 years later, the seminary has settled into a state of pleasing decrepitude. Glass and plaster are long gone. The concrete remains largely intact but stained, spalled, and spoiled. Entire roofs and staircases have caved in. The only fresh signs of life are the aprons of graffiti draped all over the “interiors.” Yet, the sense of the place lingers, its noble forms still remarkably assertive—jutting forth from the dense surrounding forest—and optimistic.

Material Focus: OE House by Fake Industries Architectural Agonism + Aixopluc

09:30 - 7 May, 2016
Material Focus: OE House by Fake Industries Architectural Agonism + Aixopluc, © José Hevia
© José Hevia

This article is part of our new "Material Focus" series, which asks architects to elaborate on the thought process behind their material choices and sheds light on the steps required to get buildings actually built.

In the Catalan countryside, on the outskirts of the small town of Alforja, sits an incongruous sight: among the scattered stone masia houses is a structure of steel and glass, a resolutely rectilinear box among the traditional housing forms. But once inside the OE House, designed by Fake Industries Architectural Agonism and Aixopluc, one realizes that the building is not so different to its neighbors after all: on the upper floor, the roof incorporates a system of ceramic vaults taken almost directly from traditional vernacular design. This feature then combines with plywood and OSB to create a truly eclectic material pallette. We spoke with the design's architects, David Tapias of Aixopluc and Cristina Goberna and Urtzi Grau of Fake Industries Architectural Agonism, to find out what lay behind these unusual material choices.

This 3D Model Shows the Damage Caused by ISIS to Palmyra's Temple of Bel

09:30 - 6 May, 2016
This 3D Model Shows the Damage Caused by ISIS to Palmyra's Temple of Bel

In August of last year, many of the most precious landmarks of the ancient city of Palmyra were damaged or destroyed by the forces of ISIS in a violent, iconoclastic attempt to send a message to the rest of the world. Since the UNESCO World Heritage Site was recaptured in March, the question in the architectural preservation community has been how to rebuild and preserve the buildings. That process will begin, of course, with a thorough assessment of the damage.

Critical Round-Up: Snøhetta's SFMOMA Extension

09:30 - 5 May, 2016
Critical Round-Up: Snøhetta's SFMOMA Extension, © Jon McNeal
© Jon McNeal

Shoehorned into the narrow space behind Mario Botta’s 1995 building, the Snøhetta-designed new wing of the SFMOMA was forced to go where few museums have gone before: up. Rising 10 stories into the San Francisco skyline, the new building nearly triples the amount of existing gallery space and adds a new entrance into what is now one of the world’s largest buildings dedicated to modern art. As the museum is set to reopen to the public May 14th, the critics' takes are rolling in. Did the restrictive site inspire a unique design solution or limit the creative possibilities of the project? Read on to find out.

© Henrik Kam © Jason Chinn (Flickr: jasonchinn) © Henrik Kam © Iwan Baan +7

What Do 16,000 Photographs Say About Moscow?

04:00 - 5 May, 2016
What Do 16,000 Photographs Say About Moscow?, Courtesy of Strelka Magazine, Alla Shvydkaya
Courtesy of Strelka Magazine, Alla Shvydkaya

Once a photograph is uploaded to social media, it ceases to be part of one’s private archive and becomes public property – as well as an object of study for researchers. There have been many attempts to study photographs on the scale of "Big Data." Take, for example, the numerous and well-publicised projects by Lev Manovich’s Big Data Lab. Evidently, using the results of one study of the huge online archive of photographs to make conclusions about society at large, is not necessarily a good idea. It’s fair to say that our society is not evenly represented online: a 19-year old woman may be posting her selfies daily, but it doesn’t mean that same goes for a sixty-five year old man. That said, we can learn a lot about cities and their inhabitants from the results of studies such as these.

The Architecture of Star Wars: 7 Iconic Structures

09:30 - 4 May, 2016
The Architecture of Star Wars: 7 Iconic Structures

Perhaps the most enduring appeal of Star Wars for its fans is not simply its compelling storyline or its dramatic space battles - it is instead that this universe is, in fact, a universe, with all the complexity and depth that entails. One of the best ways to reveal that depth is through architecture, which offers the most visually striking combination of history, culture and technology available. As a result, the Star Wars universe is littered with a huge variety of fascinating architecture, from ancient temples to futuristic floating cities.

Today is the most holy day in the Star Wars fanatic’s calendar, and thanks to pages like Star Wars Architecture on Facebook and Wookieepedia, we’re celebrating the event with seven of the most interesting, astonishing and iconic architectural structures from the franchise. Enjoy, and May the 4th be with you.

The Architecture of Star Wars: 7 Iconic Structures The Architecture of Star Wars: 7 Iconic Structures The Architecture of Star Wars: 7 Iconic Structures The Architecture of Star Wars: 7 Iconic Structures +12

Fragments of Metropolis: Documenting the Expressionist Heritage of the Rhine-Ruhr Region

04:00 - 4 May, 2016

European Expressionism in architecture has, until now, suffered from neglect. Following a successful campaign for the first volume in a planned seven-part series which focused on Berlin, a new version of the Fragments of Metropolis series—which covers with the Rhein-Ruhr region of Europe—will document 155 buildings from Bochum, Bottrop, Dortmund, Duisburg to Düsseldorf, Cologne, Münster and Oberhausen. This latest volume is currently being crowdfunded.