How Energy Modeling Will Impact the Design Process

09:30 - 8 December, 2015
Morphosis' Bloomberg Center is using energy modeling to achieve a net zero rating. Image © Kilograph
Morphosis' Bloomberg Center is using energy modeling to achieve a net zero rating. Image © Kilograph

It’s a topic that cannot be avoided for any longer. The ongoing Paris Climate Conference has seen an unprecedented amount of participation - even before the summit began, over 150 countries submitted national plans of action to the United Nations - and there seems to now be a global consensus that we must cut back on our energy use and reliance on carbon polluting fossil fuels, or risk causing irreversible damage to our planet. By the end of the conference, an agreement will likely outline energy-reducing strategies by which all countries must abide. For architects, this means fundamentally changing the ways we design buildings and determine their success. Traditional building and construction methods consume large quantities of natural resources and account for a significant portion of the greenhouse gas emissions that affect climate change. In the United States, the building sector accounts for 41 percent of the country’s energy usage, according to the U.S. Green Building Council.

But this information is hardly new, and thankfully, our profession has been preparing for this change for some time. In 2006, the American Institute of Architects became the first adopters of the 2030 challenge, a call for all new buildings, developments, and major renovations to reach carbon-neutrality by 2030, with milestone goals of reduced dependence at 10-year intervals along the way. Each year, the AIA releases a progress report outlining the current standing of energy consumptions and take-aways from their findings. This year’s key conclusion? We must start integrating energy modeling techniques earlier into the design process.

Assemble Awarded the 2015 Turner Prize for Granby Four Streets

04:50 - 8 December, 2015
Design for a winter garden in a derelict home in Granby Four Streets. Image Courtesy of Assemble
Design for a winter garden in a derelict home in Granby Four Streets. Image Courtesy of Assemble

Assemble, a London-based collective who "work across the fields of art, design and architecture to create projects in tandem with the communities who use and inhabit them," have been announced as the winners of the 2015 Turner Prize – Europe’s most prestigious contemporary visual art award. Their nomination was a surprise to many, not least because an architect (or architecture collective, in this case) has not been shortlisted before. Previous winners—some of whose work has intersected with the world of architecture—include Gilbert & GeorgeAnish Kapoor (known for the Orbit at the 2012 London Olympic Games), Antony GormleyDamien HirstGillian Wearing and Grayson Perry (a collaborator on FAT's final built work).

The Cineroleum / Assemble. Image Courtesy of Assemble Yardhouse / Assemble. Image Courtesy of Assemble Items produced by the Granby Workshop to raise regeneration funds. Image Courtesy of Assemble Items produced by the Granby Workshop to raise regeneration funds. Image Courtesy of Assemble +11

When Art, Architecture and Commerce Collided: The BEST Products Showrooms by SITE

09:30 - 7 December, 2015

According to one survey, images of the BEST Products Showroom in Houston, Texas, designed by SITE (Sculpture in the Environment), appeared in more books on 20th-century architecture than any other building. The intentionally crumbling brick at that Houston store, known as “Indeterminate Façade,” and the eight other showrooms SITE designed, were simultaneously iconic and controversial, and most importantly for BEST, they brought in customers. Although SITE-founder James Wines never considered himself a Postmodernist architect, his designs for BEST, completed between 1972 and 1984, steeped in whimsical social commentary, came to symbolize the essence of Postmodernism. Today, all but one of the BEST showrooms have been demolished or altered beyond recognition, but they set a lasting precedent, and continue to influence the use of architecture in corporate branding today.

Cutler Ridge Building. Image © SITE Notch Building Plan/Elevation. Image © SITE Inside/Outside Building. Image © SITE Forest Building. Image © SITE +40

With Ward Village, Richard Meier and Bohlin Cywinski Jackson Bring Signature Architecture to Honolulu

08:00 - 7 December, 2015
Gateway Towers / Richard Meier & Partners. Image © The Howard Hughes Corporation
Gateway Towers / Richard Meier & Partners. Image © The Howard Hughes Corporation

It's become a familiar sight: glossy renderings from big-name architects promoting new luxury condo towers. But in this case the setting is unexpected, rather than New York, Chicago, or Los Angeles, these new towers are cropping up in a gentrifying area of Honolulu known as Kaka'ako, nestled between the resorts of Waikiki, and the Downtown business district. For its latest offering, Ward Village, one part of a massive redevelopment plan for the entire Kaka'ako neighborhood, has enlisted Prizker Prize-winner Richard Meier, and Bohlin Cywinski Jackson (best known for the Fifth Avenue Apple Store in New York), to design iconic towers that will no doubt attract premium prices to match their architects' celebrity cachet. And while most people celebrate the influx of new housing units in a region of limited supply, some may be wondering who these new condos are really for.

Gateway Towers / Richard Meier & Partners. Image © The Howard Hughes Corporation Ae’o / Bohlin Cywinski Jackson. Image © The Howard Hughes Corporation Waiea / James KM Cheng Architects + WCIT Architecture. Image © The Howard Hughes Corporation Anaha / Solomon Cordwell Buenz + Benjamin Woo Architects. Image © The Howard Hughes Corporation +29

Bone-Like Plastic Structures Form Biodegradeable Temporary Pavilions With "Osteobotics"

09:30 - 6 December, 2015
Courtesy of AADRL, AA School, London, UK.
Courtesy of AADRL, AA School, London, UK.

Architecture can be built with compressive elements and with tensile elements, but few materials have the ability to be stretched and also retain compressive strength. In a new project from Architectural Association DRL students Soulaf Aburas, Maria Velasquez, Giannis Nikas, and Mattia Santi, one of those materials, Polycaprolactone, a biodegradable polyester, is used to create framework from temporary pavilions and installations. Constructed using programmable robotic arms, the resulting product is a joint-less, self-supporting mono-material that shares a visual similarity to the structure of bones - giving the project its name, Osteobotics.

Courtesy of AADRL, AA School, London, UK. Courtesy of AADRL, AA School, London, UK. Courtesy of AADRL, AA School, London, UK. Courtesy of AADRL, AA School, London, UK. +21

How Peter Zumthor and His Protégé Gloria Cabral Built a Connection Beyond Language

09:30 - 5 December, 2015
Cabral examines a model of the tea chapel. Image Courtesy of Gloria Cabral and Peter Zumthor/Rolex Mentor and Protégé Arts Initiative
Cabral examines a model of the tea chapel. Image Courtesy of Gloria Cabral and Peter Zumthor/Rolex Mentor and Protégé Arts Initiative

In May last year, the Rolex Mentors & Protégés initiative announced a surprising partnership in its name: Paraguayan architect Gloria Gabral was to spend a year working alongside the famously elusive Swiss master Peter Zumthor. The differences between the two architects - from the languages they spoke to the age of their respective careers - were obvious from the outset. But as explored in this article by Paul Clemence, originally published by Metropolis Magazine as "Intuitive Connection," over the past year they've been discovering that the things that they have in common run far deeper.

It was an unlikely pair. He is a well-established architect with a long career, working out of a small town tucked deep in the mountainous Graubünden canton in Switzerland; she is at the beginning of a promising career in Asunción, Paraguay’s capital and largest city. They did not even share a common language, yet they connected through something more binding than the spoken word: an intuitive sense of space—and their work ethic.

The Evolution of Radical Urbanism: What Does the Future Hold for Our Cities?

14:50 - 4 December, 2015
Metro Cable Caracas / Urban Think Tank. Image © Iwan Baan
Metro Cable Caracas / Urban Think Tank. Image © Iwan Baan

Earlier today in Shenzhen the 6th Bi-City Biennale of Urbanism/Architecture (UABB) opened its doors to public. Under the overall theme "Re-Living the City," curators Alfredo Brillembourg and Hubert Klumpner of Urban Think Tank headed up the "Radical Urbanism" exhibit in the main venue. Brillembourg and Klumpner invited the exhibition participants to show how we can learn from ad-hoc and "bottom-up" initiatives for alternative urban solutions. In the following essay - originally printed in the UABB 2015 catalogue - the curators call for us to "rethink how we can operate within the city, learn from its emerging intelligence and shap[e] its outcomes to radical and tactical ends."

The notion of a radical urbanism draws us unavoidably into the realm of the political. Imagining a more equitable and sustainable future involves an implicit critique of the spatial and societal conditions produced by prevailing urban logics.[1] As such, we are not only reminded of Le Corbusier’s famous ultimatum, “architecture or revolution,” but its generational echo in Buckminster Fuller’s more catastrophic pronouncement, “utopia or oblivion.”[2] Both were zero-sum scenarios born of overt social disjuncture, whether the deprivations and tensions of the interwar period, or the escalating conflicts and ecological anxiety of the late 1960s. While the wave of experimental "post utopian" practices that emerged in the early 1970s positioned themselves explicitly in opposition to perceived failures of the modern movement, these disparate groups shared a belief – however disenchanted – with their predecessors in the idea that radical difference was possible, as well as a conviction that a break was necessary.

Buckminster Fuller's Montreal Biosphere. Image © Flickr user rodmaia licensed under CC BY-NC-SA 2.0 The Plug in City by Peter Cook of Archigram. Image © Peter Cook via Archigram Archives Kisho Kurokawa's Nakagin Capsule Tower. Image © Arcspace Houses built using the Walter Segal system in South London. Image © Chris Moxley +9

Beginning Your Career in Architecture: 3 Candid Pieces of Advice for Emerging Professionals

09:30 - 4 December, 2015
The offices of BIG. Image Courtesy of BIG-Bjarke Ingels Group
The offices of BIG. Image Courtesy of BIG-Bjarke Ingels Group

Last year Kevin J Singh, an Associate Professor of Architecture in the School of Design at Louisiana Tech University, adapted one of his lectures giving advice to students as they embark upon a new career into an article. That article, titled "21 Rules for a Successful Life in Architecture" and published on ArchDaily in September 2014, was a runaway success, becoming our second most-read post of 2014 and among our most visited articles of all time.

As a result of his article's success, this year Singh has taken his 21 rules as a framework for a new ebook, "Beginning Your Career in Architecture: Candid Advice for Emerging Professionals." The ebook not only elaborates on the 21 rules from the original article, but also offers questions to the reader that lead to actionable goals, giving them the nudge they need to start out on the right track. In the following excerpts from the book, Singh addresses voicing your opinions, finding - or rather creating - the role that suits your skills, and making the world a better place.

Denise Scott Brown and Robert Venturi Win 2016 AIA Gold Medal

09:25 - 3 December, 2015
© Frank Hanswijk
© Frank Hanswijk

The American Institute of Architects (AIA) has announced Denise Scott Brown, hon. FAIA and Robert Venturi, FAIA, as joint winners of the 2016 AIA Gold Medal. The AIA cited the duo for their "built projects as well as literature that set the stage for Postmodernism and nearly every other formal evolution in architecture." Scott Brown and Venturi are the first ever pair to receive the Gold Medal, after the AIA approved a change to its bylaws in 2013 that allowed the award to be presented to up to two individuals working together.

Best Products Showroom, Langhorne, Pennsylvania (1978). Image © Tom Bernard Episcopal Academy Chapel, Newtown Square (2008). Image © Matt Wargo Franklin Court, Philadelphia (1976). Image © Mark Cohn Vanna Venturi House (1964). Image © Rollin LaFrance +7

2016 YAP P.S.1 Shortlist

11:55 - 2 December, 2015
COSMO - 2015 winner of MoMA PS1's YAP. Image © Office for Political Innovation
COSMO - 2015 winner of MoMA PS1's YAP. Image © Office for Political Innovation

MoMA P.S.1 has announced five finalists to compete in the 2016 Young Architects Program (YAP). Now in it’s 16th edition, the competition will challenge a group of emerging architects to design a temporary installation within the walls of the P.S.1 courtyard for MoMA’s annual summer “Warm-Up” series.

The 2016 shortlist includes First Office / Andrew Atwood + Anna Neimark (Los Angeles, CA); ESCOBEDO + SOLIZ / Lazbent Pavel Escobedo Amaral + Andres Soliz Paz (Mexico City, Mexico); ULTRAMODERNE / Yasmin Vobis + Aaron Forrest (Providence, RI); COBALT OFFICE / Andrew Colopy and Robert Booth (Houston, TX); and Frida Escobedo (Anzures, Mexico). The winners will be announced in early 2016. 

Previous winners include COSMO (Andrés Jaque), The Living (Hy-Fi), CODA (Party Wall), Interboro Partners (Holding Pattern), Work AC (Public Farm 1), MOS (Afterparty) and SO-IL (Pole Dance).

Paul Goldberger: "Frank Gehry Really Doesn’t Want To Be Remembered as Somebody Who Just Did a Few Iconic Buildings"

09:30 - 2 December, 2015
Guggenheim Bilbao (1997). Image © Ivan Herman (ivan-herman.net) licensed under CC BY-ND 3.0
Guggenheim Bilbao (1997). Image © Ivan Herman (ivan-herman.net) licensed under CC BY-ND 3.0

After he achieved celebrity status at the turn of the millennium, in recent years the conversation around Frank Gehry has switched tones, going from near-universal admiration to widespread controversy. Yet according to Paul Goldberger, whose biography of Gehry was released in September, both adoration and critique of the architect might engender an overly simplistic interpretation of his long and storied career. In this interview originally published by Metropolis Magazine as "Q&A: Paul Goldberger on Frank Gehry's Life and Work," Goldberger delves into the many ways Gehry has been misunderstood over the years, and how his work, his psyche, and the interplay between the two have made him one of the most conversation-worthy architects of a generation.

Frank Gehry isn’t just the world’s foremost architect; he is, by all public standards, also one of our greatest living artists. Paul Goldberger’s new biography (his first), Building Art: The Life and Work of Frank Gehry, acknowledges the architect’s celebrity status but doesn’t acquiesce in it. Rather, Goldberger interrogates the peculiar psyche and restless contradictions of the man to shed light on the motivations behind the architecture. Metropolis editor Samuel Medina speaks to the newly minted biographer about defying genre conventions, unpacking the ambiguities of Gehry’s work, and giving reporters the finger.

Walt Disney Concert Hall, Los Angeles, 2003. Image © Gehry Partners, LLP The very first sketch Gehry made of the design for the Guggenheim Bilbao. Image Courtesy of Gehry Partners Fondation Loius Vuitton, Paris (2014). Image © Todd Eberle New World Center, Miami (2011) . Image © Wikimedia user Alexf licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0 +10

Starting Your Own Practice: The Challenges and Rewards, According to ArchDaily Readers

11:20 - 1 December, 2015
Office of SelgasCano. Image © Iwan Baan
Office of SelgasCano. Image © Iwan Baan

Architecture is in some ways a paradoxical profession. On one hand, it projects a popular image of the lone, creative genius, taking control over all aspects of a building project and forming them to their creative ideals. But in reality, most projects take a huge team of people, all working together to produce a building which usually represents the creative input of not only many different people, but many professions too.

One way to find a balance between these two extremes is to take more creative control over the decisions of the group - in other words, to start your own practice, guided by your creative input alone. But is that goal worth the difficulty it might take to get there? This was the question we had in mind when we asked our readers to let us know the pros and cons of starting your own firm last month. Interestingly, not a single commenter left any response about the joys of working for someone else, and the consensus was firmly that running your own practice is preferable - provided you can deal with the significant problems of doing so. Read on to find out what they had to say.

Colomina and Wigley Announce Theme For 2016 Istanbul Design Biennial: "Are We Human?"

08:05 - 1 December, 2015
© Mahmut Ceylan
© Mahmut Ceylan

At a media meeting this morning at the Istanbul Archaeological Museums Library, the curators of the 3rd Istanbul Design Biennial Beatriz Colomina and Mark Wigley announced the theme of next year's event, titled “ARE WE HUMAN?: The Design of the Species: 2 seconds, 2 days, 2 years, 200 years, 200,000 years.” The event, which will be held from October 22nd to December 4th next year, is intended to combine elements of both media documentary and archaeological project and according to the curators "will explore the intimate relationship between the concepts of 'design' and 'human.'"

A Virtual Look Into Pierre Koenig's Case Study House #22, The Stahl House

09:30 - 30 November, 2015
Courtesy of Archilogic
Courtesy of Archilogic

Without a doubt, it’s among the most famous houses in Los Angeles. The house is easy to describe: a steel framed L-plan, divided into bedrooms and the communal living spaces, all wrapped around a turquoise pool seemingly impossibly poised above the city. But words don’t do it justice. Julius Shulman’s 1960 photograph of Pierre Koenig’s Case Study House 22, perhaps better known as Stahl House, changed the fantasies of a generation.

ArchDaily Readers Debate: Preservation, BIG in Pittsburgh and Foster Imitating Frank Lloyd Wright

11:00 - 29 November, 2015
Courtesy of BIG
Courtesy of BIG

The past two weeks have seen a number of high-profile designs unveiled, including OMA in Manchester, SANAA in Budapest, Libeskind in Vilnius, Foster + Partners in Chicago and two projects involving BIG in Pittsburgh and New York. As ever with such renowned practices scooping up work, opinions flew and in some cases also produced reasoned debate over the new projects. Read on to find out what people had to say about them.

Do Architectural Preservationists Know What They’re Fighting For?

11:00 - 28 November, 2015
Earlier this year, a plan to alter James Stirling's No.1 Poultry caused a heated discussion. Image © Flickr user merula licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0
Earlier this year, a plan to alter James Stirling's No.1 Poultry caused a heated discussion. Image © Flickr user merula licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0

If there’s one thing that can get the architectural community up in arms, it’s the threat of demolition being placed over a much-loved building. Whether it’s a 44-year-old bus station, a 38-year-old hospital, or even a 12-year-old art museum, few other news stories can raise such a sustained outcry. And recently, some have started to turn their eyes toward the next wave of preservation battles: the upcoming crop of Postmodern buildings which are increasingly being placed under threat. But in all of these heated debates about preservation, do people really know what they’re arguing for?

SANAA Selected to Design Hungary’s New National Gallery – Ludwig Museum

09:44 - 27 November, 2015
© SANAA
© SANAA

After having tied with Snøhetta in a restricted competition to design the New National Gallery -- Ludwig Museum in Budapest, SANAA’s proposal has ultimately been selected as the winner, following negotiations held over the past few months. The gallery and museum will be located in the 200-year-old Városliget (City Park) and are part of the larger Liget Budapest project, which seeks to revive the park by 2018 with the addition of five new museum buildings, including Sou Fujimoto’s House of Hungarian Music.  

Why Cost Management Works Better when Architects Are in Charge

09:30 - 27 November, 2015
DrDerm Dermatology Clinic, by Atelier Central Arquitectos, was completed with the help of DIMSCALE's cost management. Image © Fernando Guerra | FG+SG
DrDerm Dermatology Clinic, by Atelier Central Arquitectos, was completed with the help of DIMSCALE's cost management. Image © Fernando Guerra | FG+SG

To talk about architecture and construction without ever mentioning cost overruns is not an easy thing to do. These kind of unforeseen problems happen in the majority of projects, as the dynamics of architecture and construction are extremely complex and often present challenges that aren't 100% controllable. Over the years, project management consultants have been integrating cost management into their services, making an effort to fill this market gap with a proper solution. Still, most of this work is performed by consultants with a financial background and little knowledge of architecture and construction solutions and processes.

With this increased attention to budgetary issues, the cost performance of projects has been steadily improving, but usually at the expense of the project’s aesthetic concept and final quality. Would it be possible to put architects in control of this kind of management? After all, they’re the ones with the conceptual sensibility and the technical knowledge necessary to perform this work in a truly integrated way.