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Butterfly Milkbar 36 / Thaipanstudio

20:00 - 25 September, 2016
Butterfly Milkbar 36 / Thaipanstudio, © T+P
© T+P

© T+P © T+P © T+P © T+P +22

  • Architects

  • Location

    36 Sukhumvit Rd, Khwaeng Bang Chak, Khet Phra Khanong, Krung Thep Maha Nakhon 10260, Thailand
  • Area

    180.0 ft2
  • Project Year

    2016
  • Photographs

Weston Williamson+Partners Wins Competition for Dubai 2020 Rail Link

16:00 - 25 September, 2016
Weston Williamson+Partners Wins Competition for Dubai 2020 Rail Link, Courtesy of Weston Williamson+Partners
Courtesy of Weston Williamson+Partners

London-based Weston Williamson+Partners (WW+P) has won the “Route 2020” competition for the Dubai 2020 rail link, a 15-kilometer, £2.2 billion metro Expolink in the United Arab Emirates

Working in collaboration with global engineer CH2M, Alstom, and Acciona and Gulermack, the firm was selected ahead of ten rival bids for the high-profile project, which will connect Nakheel Harbor & Tower with the World’s Fair site.

Courtesy of Weston Williamson+Partners Courtesy of Weston Williamson+Partners Courtesy of Weston Williamson+Partners Courtesy of Weston Williamson+Partners +4

Sasaki Wins Competition to Reshape Shanghai's Suzhou Creek

14:00 - 25 September, 2016
Sasaki Wins Competition to Reshape Shanghai's Suzhou Creek, Courtesy of Sasaki Associates
Courtesy of Sasaki Associates

U.S.-based firm Sasaki has won the international competition to redesign Suzhou Creek—also known as the Wusong River—in Shanghai, China, which was historically one of the city’s most vital water routes, but which, in recent decades, suffered severe pollution and neglect. After receiving a grant from the Asian Development Bank, the waterway has been cleaned and is now in the process of becoming a new centerpiece for Shanghai. 

Courtesy of Sasaki Associates Courtesy of Sasaki Associates Courtesy of Sasaki Associates Courtesy of Sasaki Associates +19

Hollywood Hills Residence / Struere

13:00 - 25 September, 2016
Hollywood Hills Residence / Struere, © Jeff Ong / PostRAIN Productions
© Jeff Ong / PostRAIN Productions

© Jeff Ong / PostRAIN Productions © Jeff Ong / PostRAIN Productions © Jeff Ong / PostRAIN Productions © Jeff Ong / PostRAIN Productions +21

Se Yoon Park Uses Architectural Techniques to Symbolize Life in Sculptures

12:00 - 25 September, 2016

After working for OMA, BIG, FR-EE and REXarchitect-turned-artist Se Yoon Park has dedicated the last three years to Light, Darkness, and the Tree, a sculpture series employing digital fabrication techniques to express an allegory for life. With assistants, Vladislav Markov, Kelly Koh, David Temann Lu, Ramon Rivera, Kara Moats, and Insil Jang, Park uses dynamic light and shadow to capture movement on surfaces that contort, split and disappear into each other. 

Step Inside Zaha Hadid Architects' Antwerp Port House With Thomas Mayer's Photos

11:00 - 25 September, 2016
Step Inside Zaha Hadid Architects' Antwerp Port House With Thomas Mayer's Photos, © Thomas Mayer
© Thomas Mayer

Opening to much fanfare earlier this week, Zaha Hadid Architects' Port House holds a commanding presence over the port of Antwerp. The design combines a listed and formerly derelict fire station, which was restored as part of the project, with an eye-catching glass extension which rises out of the older building's courtyard and thrusts itself towards the water in a dramatic cantilever. In the context of the port, where large infrastructure and colossal machines form the backdrop to everyday functions, the building boldly stakes its claim as the operational centerpiece, providing a space for the Port of Antwerp's 500 employees. Photographer Thomas Mayer visited the building, capturing its striking external presence and investigating how its structural gymnastics translate to the building's internal space.

© Thomas Mayer © Thomas Mayer © Thomas Mayer © Thomas Mayer +20

This Recreation of Shakespeare's Globe Theatre is Built with Shipping Containers

09:30 - 25 September, 2016
This Recreation of Shakespeare's Globe Theatre is Built with Shipping Containers, Globe by Michigan Station, Detroit. Image Courtesy of The Container Globe
Globe by Michigan Station, Detroit. Image Courtesy of The Container Globe

All the world’s a stage – quite literally so, in the case of the Container Globe, a proposal to reconstruct a version of Shakespeare’s famous Globe Theatre with shipping containers. Staying true to the design of the original Globe Theatre in London, the Container Globe sees repurposed containers come together in a familiar form, but in steel rather than wood. Founder Angus Vail hopes this change in building component will give the Container Globe both a "punk rock" element and international mobility, making it as mobile as the shipping containers that make up its structure.

Globe by the Brooklyn Bridge, New York. Image Courtesy of The Container Globe View of Stage from the Yard. Image Courtesy of The Container Globe View from Upper Seating Gallery. Image Courtesy of The Container Globe Globe in Waitangi Park, Wellington NZ. Image Courtesy of The Container Globe +21

Perspectives / Giles Miller Studio

09:00 - 25 September, 2016
Perspectives / Giles Miller Studio, © John Miller
© John Miller

© Richard Chivers © John Miller © Richard Chivers © Richard Chivers +21

Barber and Osgerby's Installation Throws Caution to the Wind for The London Design Biennale

08:00 - 25 September, 2016

In this video from CNN Style, London designers Edward Barber and Jay Osgerby discuss Forecast, a wind-powered installation they created in collaboration with V&A Museum for the first London Design Biennale. With the intent to help city residents find their way “at a time of turbulence,” the installation responds to the Biennale's theme "Utopia by Design." 

Courtesy of Barber & Osgerby Courtesy of Barber & Osgerby Courtesy of Barber & Osgerby © Ed Reeve +7

Socialist Modernism on Your Smartphone: This Research Group is Raising Funds for a Crowdsourcing Mobile App

07:10 - 25 September, 2016
Slovak Radio building, Bratislava, Slovakia. Built 1967-83. Architect: Štefan Svetko, Štefan Ďurkovič, Barnabáš Kissling. Photo by Dumitru Rusu. Image © BACU
Slovak Radio building, Bratislava, Slovakia. Built 1967-83. Architect: Štefan Svetko, Štefan Ďurkovič, Barnabáš Kissling. Photo by Dumitru Rusu. Image © BACU

Recent years have seen a rapidly increasing interest in the architecture of the former Soviet Union. Thanks to the internet, enthusiasts of architectural history are now able to discover unknown buildings on a daily basis, and with the cultural and historical break caused by the collapse of the Soviet Union, each photograph of a neglected and decaying edifice can feel like an undiscovered gem. However, often it can be difficult to find more information about these buildings and to understand their place in the arc of architectural history.

That was the reason behind the creation of Socialist Modernism, a research platform started by BACU - Birou pentru Artă şi Cercetare Urbană (Bureau for Art and Urban Research) which "focuses on those modernist trends from Central and Eastern Europe which are insufficiently explored in the broader context of global architecture." Socialist Modernism already consists of a website on which BACU has cataloged a number of remarkable and little-known buildings. However, now the team is raising funds on Indiegogo's Generosity platform for the next step in their research project. With this money they hope to create an app on which users can add new sites and buildings to the database.

Bus stop in Tajikistan, built in the late 70s. Photo by Dumitru Rusu. Image © BACU 25 May Sportcenter, now the Sportsko rekreativno poslovni centar, Belgrade, Serbia. Built 1973-75. Architect: Ivan Antic. Photo by Dumitru Rusu. Image © BACU Housing complex, Manhattan, Wroclaw, Poland. Built 1968-1973. Architect: Jadwiga Hawrylak-Grabowska. Photo Dumitru Rusu. Image © BACU Public utilities building for telephone and postal services, Cluj-Napoca, Romania. Built 1966-69. Architect: Vasile Mitreaphoto. Photo by Dumitru Rusu. Image © BACU +43

La Cité Des Arts / L´Atelier

05:00 - 25 September, 2016
La Cité Des Arts / L´Atelier, © Hervé Douris
© Hervé Douris

© Hervé Douris © Hervé Douris © Hervé Douris © Hervé Douris +16

  • Architects

  • Location

    Saint-Denis, Réunion
  • Area

    15000.0 sqm
  • Project Year

    2016
  • Photographs

The Rosenberg Golan and Ricky Home / SO Architecture

02:00 - 25 September, 2016
The Rosenberg Golan and Ricky Home / SO Architecture, © Shai Epstein
© Shai Epstein

© Shai Epstein © Shai Epstein © Shai Epstein © Shai Epstein +15

The Stepped Roof / Had Architects

20:00 - 24 September, 2016
The Stepped Roof / Had Architects, © Arch-exist Photography & Wuyu Visual
© Arch-exist Photography & Wuyu Visual

© Arch-exist Photography & Wuyu Visual © Arch-exist Photography & Wuyu Visual © Arch-exist Photography & Wuyu Visual © Arch-exist Photography & Wuyu Visual +14

Take a Tour Inside Shanghai's Cultural Hotspot

16:00 - 24 September, 2016

Take a walk through the Hub Performance and Exhibition Center, designed by Neri&Hu Design and Research Office, in the dynamic Hongqiao District of Shanghai, China. The video, produced with Pedro Pegenaute, showcases the Center's nature-inspired interior, featuring dramatic lighting and views framed by walnut- and oak-covered aluminum branches recalling forest canopies. 

Sam Jacob Studio "Resurrects" Unrealized Adolf Loos Mausoleum in London Cemetery

14:00 - 24 September, 2016
Sam Jacob Studio "Resurrects" Unrealized Adolf Loos Mausoleum in London Cemetery , © Sarah Duncan
© Sarah Duncan

Sam Jacob Studio has created a replica of Adolf Loos’ unrealized 1921 mausoleum in Highgate Cemetary, London, which is home to the graves of Karl Marx and Malcolm McLaren, amongst other notable figures.

© Harry Mitchell © Sarah Duncan © Sarah Duncan © Harry Mitchell +6

5 Initiatives That Show the Rise of Open Source Architecture

13:30 - 24 September, 2016
5 Initiatives That Show the Rise of Open Source Architecture

In architecture, perhaps the most remarkable change heralded by the 20th was the radical rethinking of housing provision which it brought, driven by a worldwide population explosion and the devastation of two world wars. Of course, Modernism’s reappraisal of the design and construction of housing was one part of this trajectory, but still Modernism was underpinned by a traditional process, needing clients, designers and contractors. Arguably more radical were a small number of fringe developments, such as mail-order houses in the US and Walter Segal’s DIY home designs in the UK. These initiatives sought to turn the traditional construction process on its head, empowering people to construct their own homes by providing materials and designs as cheaply as possible.

In the 21st century, the spirit of these fringe movements is alive and well, but the parameters have changed somewhat: with a rise in individualism, and new technologies sparking the “maker movement,” the focus has shifted away from providing people with the materials to construct a fixed design, and towards improving access to intellectual property, allowing more people to take advantage of cheap and effective designs. The past decade has seen a number of initiatives aimed at spreading open source architectural design--read on to find out about five of them.

400 Grove / Fougeron Architecture

13:00 - 24 September, 2016
400 Grove / Fougeron Architecture, © William Timmerman
© William Timmerman

© William Timmerman © Joe Fletcher © William Timmerman © William Timmerman +30

Comic Break: "Overnight Renderings"

12:00 - 24 September, 2016
Comic Break: "Overnight Renderings", © Architexts
© Architexts

Murphy’s Law, right? The thing is, since technology moves so fast, chances are you’re using slow and/or outdated hardware to build and render your models. Of course, those software crashes always get you when a client needs to see your work. And yet, when you tell the bosses you need better hardware, or updated software, they often scoff and lecture you about the costs. Perhaps one day they’ll understand the struggle of the production staff, but it seems like for now, not so much. So, good luck at the office today, hopefully, everything will work.