Balnea Pavillon des arbres / Blouin Tardif Architecture-Environnement

© Steve Montpetit

Architects: Blouin Tardif Architecture-Environnement
Location: , QC,
Year: 2014
Photographs: Steve Montpetit

In Residence: Knud Holscher

NOWNESS takes you inside Danish architect ’s minimalist, brick-and-glass home on a suburban cul-de-sac just 25 minutes north of Copenhagen. Holscher, one of Denmark’s most acclaimed architects and industrial designers, built the 1970s home to experiment with what he believes makes an ideal home: a modest open plan, clean lines and simple interiors.

Milken Institute School of Public Health / Payette

© Robert Benson

Architects: Payette
Location: , DC, USA
Area: 161100.0 ft2
Year: 2014
Photographs: Robert Benson

Salvaged Stadium: Harvard GSD Student Yaohua Wang’s Proposal for Post-Olympic Adaptation

© Yaohua Wang

Olympic host cities around the world are increasingly facing issues of post-event sustainability, with many stadiums and arenas falling into disuse and dilapidation mere months after the games. The soaring costs associated with constructing Olympic facilities have plagued organizers for decades, resulting in an all-time low number of bids from host cities for the 2022 Winter Olympics, according to the International Olympic Committee. Yaohua Wang is a recent architecture graduate of the Harvard University Graduate School of Design and a native of China - where facilities constructed for the 2008 Beijing Olympics are slowly being converted to new post-Olympic uses, typified by the transformation of the Watercube into the city’s newest waterpark. Wang’s thesis project, Salvaged Stadium, delves into the afterlife of Olympic facilities, providing a solution for arena reuse with potential for application worldwide. 

Find out how Wang re-evaluated the Olympic development problem after the break

Call for ArchDaily Interns: Spring 2015

 is in need of a select group of awesome, architecture-obsessed interns to join our team for Spring 2015 (January – June)! If you want to spend your days researching/writing about the best architecture around the globe – and find out what it takes to work for the world’s most visited architecture website – then read on after the break…

Kirkmichael Primary School / Holmes Miller

© Andrew Lee

Architects: Holmes Miller
Location: Ayrshire House, King Street, , Inverurie, Aberdeenshire AB51 0EQ,
Contractor: Clark Contracts Ltd
Year: 2014
Photographs: Andrew Lee

Artworks by Architects to be Auctioned for Maggie’s Centres

For its annual Charity Christmas Auction, this year London‘s Anise Gallery is planning to raise money for Maggie’s, the cancer care charity which has commissioned high profile buildings from architects such as Frank Gehry, Zaha Hadid, OMA, Richard Rogers and Snøhetta. The Anise Gallery’s auction features works by both artists and architects, including four architects who have contributed Maggie’s Centres themselves: Ted Cullinan, Chris Wilkinson of Wilkinson Eyre, and Piers Gough of CZWG, responsible for the Newcastle, Oxford, and Nottingham Centres respectively.

Others featured in the auction include architects Alison BrooksPeter Murray, Jack Pringle, Christophe Egret, Rab Bennetts Je Ahn and Stuart Piercy, alongside artists including Ben Johnson, Norman Ackroyd and Jeanette Barnes. Until the auction on December 6th, all the works are on display at the Anise Gallery, however online bidding opens on November 26th here - alternatively, check out a selection of the available lots after the break.

Last Is More: The Miesian Lesson

Courtesy of The Images Publishing Group

The following is an excerpt from Last Is More: Mies, IBM and the Transformation of Chicago. The Langham Hospitality Group commissioned architectural photojournalists Robert Sharoff and William Zbaren to document the transformation of eminent architect Mies van der Rohe‘s IBM Building — the last skyscraper he designed — into The Langham, Chicago. In this chapter, Sharoff and Zbaren provide a more detailed look into the period between 1965 and 1975, when Mies’s influence on Chicago’s skyline was at its most pervasive.

The construction of the IBM Building occurred midway through a legendary period in Chicago architecture—the decadelong building boom between 1965 and 1975, when Mies’s influence on the city’s skyline was at its most pervasive.

During these years, numerous Miesian structures by firms such as Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, C. F. Murphy Associates, and Loebl, Schlossman & Bennett were erected, and the city’s reputation as the founder of American modernism was finally and firmly established. The best of those buildings continue to dominate the skyline.

House F / Finckh Architekten

Courtesy of

Architects: Finckh Architekten
Location:
Area: 214.0 sqm
Year: 2014
Photographs: Courtesy of Finckh Architekten

Courtesy of Arup
Courtesy of Arup

Is Heatherwick’s Garden Bridge “Nothing But A Wasteful Blight”?

After a fortnight of highs and lows for Thomas Heatherwick and British celebrity Joanna Lumley’s campaign for a garden bridge stretching across London’s River Thames, Rowan Moore of The Observer has meticulously described the project as “nothing but a wasteful blight.” Although he acknowledges that support for the bridge “has been overwhelming,” he argues that Heatherwick – though an “inventive and talented product designer” – has a past record in large scale design which “raises reasonable doubts about whether his bridge will be everything now promised.”

Fine Arts Museum / Estudio Hago

© Fernando Alda

Architects: Estudio Hago
Location: , ,
Architect In Charge: Antonio Álvarez-Cienfuegos Rubio & Emilio Delgado Martos
Area: 3298.0 sqm
Year: 214
Photographs: Fernando Alda

House Feurstein / Innauer‐Matt Architekten

© Adolf Bereuter

Architects: Innauer‐Matt Architekten
Location: 6867 Schwarzenberg,
Area: 140.0 sqm
Year: 2011
Photographs: Adolf Bereuter

KURO Building / KINO Architects

© Daici Ano

Architects: KINO Architects
Location: Tokyo, Japan
Area: 75.0 sqm
Year: 2013
Photographs: Daici Ano

© T. R. Hamzah & Yeang Sdn. Bhd. (2014)
© T. R. Hamzah & Yeang Sdn. Bhd. (2014)

Braunschweig Hortitecture Symposium to Explore Synergies of Architecture and Plant Material

Starting December 10, the Hortitecture 01 Symposium will kickstart a (free) public lecture series in Braunschweig, Germany, centered around brainstorming synergistic strategies for integrating architecture and vegetal matter. Stefano Boeri, MVRDV and WORKac are among a list of interdisciplinary experts that will join together to offer discussions focused around the exploration of vernacular wisdom and contemporary architectural solutions to sustainable building problems. More on the symposium, after the break.

JAJA Wins Second Prize for Swedish Housing and Market Hall Hybrid

Mainstreet . Image © JAJA Architects

JAJA Architects has won second prize in an open competition for a combined affordable housing and market hall in the heart of , . Designed for a site currently occupied by an arcade and bus stop, the hybrid proposal, known as “Torghallen,” focuses on reconnecting two open plazas by devoting the ground floor to the public. 

The jury, which selected JAJA’s design ahead of 135 other proposals, stated: “The clear concept of a light building that touches the ground in few points creates a strong connection and transparency between the surrounding urban spaces.”

Housed en Adra / EXarchitects

© Miguel de Guzmán

Architects: EXarchitects
Location: Adra, Almería, Spain
Architect In Charge: Claudia Cruz, José Salinas
Construction: Holtzdesign.es
Area: 65.0 sqm
Year: 2012
Photographs: Miguel de Guzmán

Video: A Conversation with the Architects of the 9/11 Memorial Museum

“Typically, museums are icons that contain exhibits. This is the inverse: the exhibit is the icon.”

In this video, architects Steven M. Davis, Mark Wagner, and Carl F. Krebs of Davis Brody Bond come together to discuss the design process and visitor experience of the 9/11 Memorial Museum. Technical complexities and deeply emotional responses challenged the architects to craft an immersive experience of remembering. From the enormous scale of the site, to the celebration of the iconic surviving artifacts, the designers describe the overwhelming authenticity preserved by the memorial.

Wagner explains, “It pushed us architecturally, to not just look at the physical attributes, but to dive in emotionally… we need markers in our history, we need something to bring us back to that moment.” It is this authenticity and embedded emotive power that the architects aim to enhance. Watch the video above to listen in on the conversation.

Critical Round-Up: Renzo Piano’s Harvard Art Museums

© Nic Lehoux

With the opening of the Harvard Art Museums a week ago today, Renzo Piano was able to finally complete on a project which, in various guises, has been in progress for seventeen years. The relationship between Piano and Harvard began with a 1997 plan to build a new branch of the Fogg Museum on the Charles River and ended, after objections from locals and then the 2008 recession, in the decision to consolidate the university’s three museums (The Fogg, Busch-Reisinger and Arthur M Sackler Museums) under one roof.

With its long history, restricted space, the listed facade of the original Fogg Museum and the ultimate difficult neighbor in Le Corbusier’s Carpenter Center for the Visual Arts, the Harvard Art Museums project was inevitably going to cause a fuss on completion. So how did Piano do? Find out what the critics said after the break.