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New London Architecture: The Latest Architecture and News

2019 to be a Record-Breaking Year for Tall Buildings in London

11:00 - 6 March, 2019
2019 to be a Record-Breaking Year for Tall Buildings in London, 100 Leadenhall Street - SOM exterior view . Image © Cityscape Digital
100 Leadenhall Street - SOM exterior view . Image © Cityscape Digital

New London Architecture has published the results of their annual Tall Building Survey. Now in its sixth year, the report declares 2019 as “The Year of the Tall Building” with a record number of 76 tall buildings set to be completed in the UK capital in 2019.

Among the key findings from the report, it was revealed that the completion of tall buildings is set to be three times higher than in 2018. There are currently 541 tall buildings in the pipeline for the capital, with 22 out of London’s 33 boroughs containing tall buildings under construction. These tall buildings will offer more than 110,000 new homes for a city with chronic housing shortages.

London Skyline . Image © JasonHawkes 3 One Park Drive. Image © Herzog & de Meuron Exterior Mid-level Ravensbourne Wharf . Image © Craftworks Mapleton Crescent. Image © Metropolitan Workshop + Pocket Living - River View + 6

The 30 Most Influential Architects in London

09:00 - 15 October, 2018
The 30 Most Influential Architects in London,  by Hufton + Crow
by Hufton + Crow

As a “global capital,” London is home to some of the world’s most influential people, architects included. This fact has recently been laid bare by the London Evening Standard newspaper, whose list of the 1000 most influential Londoners features 30 architects, big and small, who use the city as a base for producing some of the world’s most celebrated architectural works.

Below, we have rounded up the 30 most influential architects in London, complete with examples of the architectural works which have put them on the city and world map.

 by Nigel Young  by Rob Parrish  by Darren Bradley  by Iwan Baan + 31

Survey Results Show More Tall Buildings Planned for London

06:00 - 17 March, 2016
Survey Results Show More Tall Buildings Planned for London, © Visualhouse and photographer Dan Lowe
© Visualhouse and photographer Dan Lowe

Since this time last year, an additional 119 new tall buildings have been planned for London, according to a report published by New London Architecture (NLA) and GLHearn. This brings the total number of planned, tall buildings -- buildings of 20 floors or taller -- to 436.

The research conducted by the NLA shows that since last year, the number of tall buildings undergoing construction has inched from 70 to 89. An impressive 223 tall buildings have received planning approval and 114 towers are in pre-application or planning stages. Ninety-four tall buildings, up from 72 buildings in the previous year, were submitted for planning. Of those 94, 43 were approved in the same year. The survey also notes that a significant number of these tall buildings are part of larger scale master plans, which situate multiple towers in clusters.

NLA and Mayor of London Select 10 Winners in "London's Housing Crisis" Competition

12:00 - 13 October, 2015
NLA and Mayor of London Select 10 Winners in "London's Housing Crisis" Competition, Buoyant Starts / Floating Homes Ltd with Baca Architects. Image Courtesy of New London Architecture
Buoyant Starts / Floating Homes Ltd with Baca Architects. Image Courtesy of New London Architecture

Following their selection of 100 ideas to help solve London's housing crisis last month, New London Architecture (NLA) and the Mayor of London have narrowed down the entrants to ten winners which they believe offer exemplary models for the UK capital. The selected designs range from radical architectural solutions, such as Floating Homes and Baca Architects' proposal to create 7,500 new homes in a matter of mere months by floating small abodes in London's canals, to radical economic solutions such as David Kroll's recommendation to separate the value of properties from the value of the land they occupy.

In addition to being displayed alongside the 90 other proposals in an exhibition put on by NLA, these ten projects will be presented to the Greater London Authority to be assessed for their feasibility as real-world solutions to the crisis. Together, these ten designs provide insights into potential solutions - but also the many different causes - of London's housing crisis. Read on for images and descriptions of all ten designs.

100 Ideas for Solving London's Housing Crisis, According to New London Architecture

06:00 - 17 September, 2015
Innovation License by Baca Architects. Image Courtesy of New London Architecture
Innovation License by Baca Architects. Image Courtesy of New London Architecture

With ideas ranging from floating homes to new mega-cities, New London Architecture has revealed 100 proposals to address the housing crisis in London. The ideas will be on display as part of the New Ideas for Housing exhibition at the NLA Galleries in the Building Centre in London. After an open ideas competition announced June 2015, over 200 entries from 16 different countries were received. Of the 100 shortlisted projects 10 finalists will be selected and have the opportunity to work with the Greater London Authority to implement their ideas. Read more about the entries and exhibit after the break.

MODS by HAL Architects. Image Courtesy of New London Architecture Living Arteries by Benjamin Marks. Image Courtesy of New London Architecture Floatopolis by dRMM. Image Courtesy of New London Architecture The Streets by NBBJ. Image Courtesy of New London Architecture + 14

Call for Submissions: New Ideas for Housing London

04:00 - 18 June, 2015
Call for Submissions: New Ideas for Housing London, The dense centre of London
The dense centre of London

New London Architecture have launched an international ideas competition to tackle the ongoing demands of London's growing housing shortage, in partnership with the office of the Mayor of London. They envisage that New Ideas for Housing London will provide opportunities for any level of designer, "be they a large organisation or just one person with a big idea," to submit a proposal "that could help shape the future of the UK capital." Selected entrants will work alongside the Greater London Authority to explore how the ideas could be put into practice. The organisers state that "no idea is too big or too small, as long as it can be applied to the capital."

New London Architecture Unveils Updated 1:2000 Scale Model Of The UK Capital

05:00 - 24 April, 2015
New London Architecture Unveils Updated 1:2000 Scale Model Of The UK Capital, © Paul Raftery
© Paul Raftery

New London Architecture (NLA), an independent resource and forum for debate about the city's built environment, have unveiled a new, large-scale interactive model of the UK capital. Designed to provide a visual history of the city, NLA also intend for it to spark questions about its future. This model replaces an earlier one, which was revealed on the day that it was announced that London's bid to host the 2012 Olympic Games has been successful. Now, a decade later, the present projection of the city's built future has been mapped across the model, highlighting the locations of the 263 tall buildings planned or under construction. Visitors are also able to track the route and impact of new transport links, such as HS2 and Crossrail.

New London Architecture Reveals The Latest Figures in The City's Tall Building Boom

04:00 - 20 March, 2015
New London Architecture Reveals The Latest Figures in The City's Tall Building Boom, © Jason Hawkes
© Jason Hawkes

"If London doesn’t grow up, it will need to grow out." Following last year's report, New London Architecture (NLA) in cooperation with GLHearn (an independent property consultancy) have released the results of their annual London Tall Buildings Survey. In 2014, they forecast 236 new tall buildings for the British capital, a figure which has risen to 263 buildings over twenty stories for 2015. Alongside this, they believe that around 14,800 new homes are "under construction for London."

See these numbers broken down after the break.

2015 London Festival Of Architecture To Explore 'Work In Progress'

00:00 - 8 January, 2015
2015 London Festival Of Architecture To Explore 'Work In Progress', A changing skyline. Image Courtesy of CPAT / Hayes Davidson / Jason Hawkes
A changing skyline. Image Courtesy of CPAT / Hayes Davidson / Jason Hawkes

It has been revealed that the theme for the 2015 London Festival of Architecture (LFA) will centre around 'Work In Progress'. The festival, which is comprised of a series of events in and around the UK capital, seeks to "highlight the key role architecture plays in social, urban and cultural development." The annual celebration, which will run between the 1st and 30th June, will be jointly delivered by the Architecture Foundation, the British Council, New London Architecture, and the RIBA's London branch. Last year's 10th anniversary festival saw over 200 events ranging from walking tours and cycle rides, to exhibitions, talks, debates and films all addressing the theme of 'Capital'.

Video: Peter Murray of New London Architecture Outlines his Cycling Vision

00:00 - 2 November, 2014

In the latest video from Crane.tv, architectural journalist and planner Peter Murray ruminates on the benefits of integrating cycling into the urban fabric of the world's biggest cities. "For the last half century, we've bowed down to the god of the motor car and have destroyed cities across the UK," says Murray, Chairman of New London Architecture and the London Society. Murray and his team at New London Architecture are charged with analyzing and advocating for the improvement of London's Built environment, acting as advisors to Mayor Boris Johnson on an array of projects including the overhaul of cycling infrastructure in the city.

3 Architects Appointed to Oversee £100 Million Cycling Infrastructure In London

00:00 - 6 June, 2014
3 Architects Appointed to Oversee £100 Million Cycling Infrastructure In London, Though the schemes are not exactly as dramatic as Foster + Partners' Skycycle (pictured), they are part of a real commitment to make London more cycle-friendly. Image © Foster + Partners
Though the schemes are not exactly as dramatic as Foster + Partners' Skycycle (pictured), they are part of a real commitment to make London more cycle-friendly. Image © Foster + Partners

Roger Hawkins (Hawkins\Brown), Sunand Prasad (Penoyre & Prasad) and Peter Murray (New London Architecture) have all been appointed by the Mayor of London to oversee the implementation of £100 million worth of cycling infrastructure in the city.

The scheme will focus on three London Boroughs: Kingston, Enfield and Waltham Forest, each of which were awarded "mini-Holland" status - a reference to the cycling haven of the Netherlands which these areas of London will be modeled on. Each borough will nominate their own principal designers, but the three appointed architects, who all sit on the Mayor's design advisory panel, will be acting as consultant and client for a different borough.

Read on after the break for a rundown of the proposed changes

Does London's Planning System Lack Civic Representation?

00:00 - 4 June, 2014
Does London's Planning System Lack Civic Representation?, London's skyline is set to be dramatically altered by tall buildings in the near future. Image Courtesy of CPAT / Hayes Davidson / Jason Hawkes
London's skyline is set to be dramatically altered by tall buildings in the near future. Image Courtesy of CPAT / Hayes Davidson / Jason Hawkes

A debate organized by New London Architecture (NLA) has revealed a strong need for civic societies in London which protect the interests of the public in planning decisions, offering New York as a potential model. The debate, which was one of the headline events at the London Festival of Architecture, was organized in response to a study which showed over 200 tall buildings were currently in the pipeline for the UK's capital, which sparked fears that the current planning system was not fit for the purpose of controlling development in the city.

More on the debate after the break