Dutch Architects Transform Rotterdam House Into Terraced “Urban Paradise”

© Thomas Mayer

Two Dutch designers, collectively known as HUNK-design, have transformed their 19th century top floor apartment into a “unique city paradise.” Architect Bart Cardinaal and artist Nadine Roos, who have lived in parts of the house in central Rotterdam since their student years, have created a large outdoor terraced space amid the rooflines of a built up area. By demolishing the existing pitched roof, they have constructed what they describe as their “Cabrio apartment.”

Erasmus University College in Rotterdam / Erick van Egeraat

© Ossip van Duivenbode

Architects: Erick van Egeraat
Location: Nieuwemarkt 1A, 3011 HP , The Netherlands
Year: 2014
Photographs: Ossip van Duivenbode

Sam Jacob & Wouter Vanstiphout on Curating “A Clockwork Jerusalem”

The Mound. Image © James Taylor-Foster

The British Pavilion at the 2014 Venice Biennale takes the large scale projects of the 1950’s, 60’s and 70’s and explores the “mature flowering of British Modernism at the moment it was at its most socially, politically and architecturally ambitious but also the moment that witnessed its collapse.” The exhibition tells the story of how British modernity emerged out of an unlikely combination of interests and how “these modern visions continue to create our physical and imaginative landscapes.” To those who know the UK‘s architectural heritage, this cultural and social history is delivered in a way which feels strangely familiar, whilst uncovering fascinating hidden histories of British modernity that continue to resonate in the 21st century.

We caught up with Sam Jacob, co-founder of FAT Architecture (of which this exhibition is their final project), and Wouter Vanstiphout, partner at Rotterdam-based Crimson Architectural Historians, outside the British Pavilion to discuss the ideas behind, and significance of, A Clockwork Jerusalem.

© James Taylor-Foster

Harvard GSD Releases Video of Study Abroad Studio with Rem Koolhaas

via TheHarvardGSD’s youtube channel

“We encounter similarities and difference, but what we encounter more than anything else is how intensely all these seemingly stable elements are evolving in time. Sometimes with acceleration, sometimes with moments of stagnation, but actually they are constantly changing. So what seemed to be a look at the repertoire is actually turning into a look at how nothing is stable.” –

The Harvard GSD has released a video from the Fall 2013 study abroad studio in Rotterdam, the Netherlands. The students who relocated to Rotterdam for last year’s fall semester worked on the “Elements of Architecture” exhibition that will open in the Central Pavilion during the 2014 International Architecture Exhibition in Venice, . Watch Rem and the students reflect on their research, after the break…

Rotterdam Unveils Mirrored, MVRDV-Designed Art Depot for Museumpark

©

The City of has unveiled MVRDV’s competition winning design for a new public art depot in Rotterdam’s Museumpark. Clad in a highly reflective glass, the cylindrical BREEAM Excellent-planned “Collection Building” will store the “precious art collection of Rotterdam” as well as offer commercial interior storage for private collectors. It is designed to expose the inter workings of a museum, winding visitors up a public route, past storage rooms and restoration workshops, to a rooftop exhibition space, sculpture garden and restaurant.

AD Classics: Kubuswoningen / Piet Blom

© Dirk Verwoerd

A popular tourist attraction and bizarre architectural experiment, the Kubuswoningen is located in the Oude Haven, the most historic section of Rotterdam’s port. Following the destruction of the Oude Haven during the Second World War, architect Piet Blom was asked to redevelop the area with architecture of character, presenting him the opportunity to apply his earlier cube housing exploration in Helmond to a more urban context.  Known for his desire to challenge conventions, Blom did not want the Kubuswoningen to resemble typical housing; he strived to dissolve the attitude that “a building has to be recognizable as a house for it to qualify as housing.”  During a time when the rebuilding of was pivotal, the Kubuswoningen served as an influential precedent for progressive and innovative architectural development.  

In OMA’s De Rotterdam, Furniture Transforms 60-meters into Multi-Functional, Versatile Space

OMA’s De Rotterdam, a project 15 years in the making, is designed to maximize the number of functions possible in 44 floors. In addition to shops, hotels and office space, this “vertical city” also contains apartments that use transformable furniture to pack a variety of uses into small spaces. Chairs double as wall art and sofas flip into beds, showing that a 60 square meter apartment is more versatile than we think. 

Developer Wim De Lathauwer explains, ”Why would we only think in quantity of bedrooms and square meters, while many of these spaces are used only sporadically?…In The we are simply not used to this way of thinking. De Rotterdam is the ideal project when it comes to maximizing the joy of every square meter. We deal with an audience who understands this and yearns for this extra quality. Even in the large apartments the office, wardrobe- and guest room are combined in one space. Actually, it is very logical.” You can see the dynamic furniture, designed by Clei Italia, in the video below. 

Read more about ’ largest building here

Erasmus Pavilion / Powerhouse Company + DeZwarteHond

© Christian van der Kooy

Architects: Powerhouse Company + DeZwarteHond
Location: Rotterdam, The Netherlands
Project Leader: Stefan Prins
Partners In Charge: Nanne de Ru, Willem Hein Schenk
Area: 1,800 sqm
Year: 2013
Photographs: Christian van der Kooy, Rene de Wit

Unielocatie Zuiderpark / JHK Architecten

© Jeroen Musch

Architects: JHK Architecten
Location: Montessoriweg, ,
Area: 22,000 sqm
Year: 2012
Photographs: Jeroen Musch, Rhalda Jansen, Courtesy of JHK Architecten, Rein van der Zee

Het Buro De Bovenkamer / Krill Architecture + Christian Müller Architects

© Jeroen Musch

Architects: Krill Architecture , Christian Müller Architects
Location: Rochussenstraat 355, 3023 DL Rotterdam, The Netherlands
Project Architects: Harmen van de Wal, Christian Müller
Contributors: Arnold de Bruin, Barbara Costatino, Raimonda Cibayte, PaulPeter Kuper, Magdalena Merchan, Jiri Serek, Elena Vicente
Programmatic Concept : Het Observatorium, Greetje Hoitink en/and Krill architecture, met/with Hans Venhuizen, Michaela Stegerwald Architectuur, John van de Wetering Advies
Area: 1385.0 sqm
Year: 2012
Photographs: Jeroen Musch

B05 / NL Architects

Courtesy of NL Architects

Architects: NL Architects
Location: Boezemlaan, Rotterdam,
Architects In Charge: Pieter Bannenberg, Walter van Dijk, Kamiel Klaasse
Project Architect: Sarah Möller
Area: 3600.0 sqm
Year: 2013
Photographs: Courtesy of NL Architects

B’ Tower / Wiel Arets Architects

© Jan Bitter

Architects: Wiel Arets Architects
Location: Rotterdam, The
Design Team: Wiel Arets, Bettina Kraus, Carsten Hilgendorf, Joris van den Hoogen
Area: 15,000 sqm
Year: 2013
Photographs: Jan Bitter

Koolhaas on Place, Scale, and (De) Rotterdam

© Richard John Seymour

All images are from photographer Richard John Seymour,who caught Rem Koolhaas’ recently completed De Rotterdam building on a broodingly foggy morning. 

At the opening of the newly constructed De Rotterdam building in his home city, Rem Koolhaas spoke at length about how this “vertical city” was designed to appear scaleless, despite its urban context. More about what Koolhaas had to say about the project and the city, after the break…

De Rotterdam / OMA

© Michel van de Kar

Architects: OMA
Location: Rotterdam, The
Architect In Charge: Rem Koolhaas, Reinier de Graaf, Ellen van Loon, Kees van Casteren
Area: 162000.0 sqm
Year: 2013
Photographs: Michel van de Kar, Charlie Koolhaas, Ossip van Duivenbode, Philippe Ruault

Wainwright Weighs In on Rem’s De Rotterdam

Courtesy of

In the architectural stomping ground that is , it’s no small task to design a building that actually stands out. But, according to The Guardian’s Oliver Wainwright, the recently completed De Rotterdam building manages to. Although the Koolhaas-designed structure, which houses offices, apartments and even a boutique hotel, may at first seem simple (simplistic, even), Wainwright praises how the shifting masses cleverly play tricks on your perception. The building is undoubtedly impressive, but is the unconventional envelope enough to distract from a bland-at-best interior? Read the rest of Wainwright’s critique here. evaluate

Educational Center Erasmus University Medical Center / Claus en Kaan Architecten

© Sebastian van Damme

Architects: Claus en Kaan Architecten
Location: , The Netherlands
Area: 34,000 sqm
Year: 2012
Photographs: Sebastian van Damme, Bart Gosselin, Marco van Middelkoop

Dreamhouse / Claus en Kaan Architecten

© Sebastian van Damme

Architects: Claus en Kaan Architecten
Location: Rotterdam, The
Design Team: Kees Kaan, Vincent Panhuysen Luca Baialardo, Timo Cardol, Aksel Coruh, Luuk Dietz, Paolo Faleschini, Antonia Rief
Area: 1,050 sqm
Year: 2013
Photographs: Sebastian van Damme

Rotterdam Centraal / Team CS

© Jannes Linders

Architects: West 8, Benthem Crouwel Architects, MVSA Meyer en van Schooten Architecten
Location: Stationsplein 1, 3013 AJ Rotterdam,
Lead Architects: Jan Benthem, Marcel Blom, Adriaan Geuze, Jeroen van Schooten
Design Team: Arman Akdogan, Anja Blechen, Freek Boerwinkel, Amir Farokhian, Joost Koningen, Joost van Noort, Falk Schneeman, Daphne Schuit, Matthijs Smit (†), Andrew Tang, Wouter Thijssen, Joost Vos
Area: 50,000 sqm
Year: 2013
Photographs: Jannes Linders, Skeyes