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Robert Am Stern

Spotlight: Robert A.M. Stern

10:30 - 23 May, 2017
Spotlight: Robert A.M. Stern, George W. Bush Presidential Center. Image © <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:George_W._Bush_Presidential_Center_July_2016_2.jpg'>Wikimedia user Michael Barera</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0/deed.en'>CC BY-SA 4.0</a>
George W. Bush Presidential Center. Image © Wikimedia user Michael Barera licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0

As founder of Robert A.M. Stern Architects and former Dean of the Yale School of Architecture, Robert A.M. Stern is a self-proclaimed modern traditionalist – and no, in his eyes, that is not an oxymoron. When asked about the seeming contradiction in a PBS documentary, he replies by musing, "Can one speak the local languages of architecture in a fresh way?"

A Selection of Name-Based Architecture Memes

06:00 - 13 January, 2017

The world of architecture can be a serious place. Though the rest of the world holds quite a few stereotypes about architects, unfortunately none of them include us having a sense of humor—and perhaps that seriousness explains why one of the most popular memes involving architects isn't exactly favorable to the profession. Here at ArchDaily we thought we'd do just a little to correct that with some memes riffing on some of the profession's most beloved names—as our gift to the entire architectural profession. Read on to see what we've come up with, and don't forget to get involved with your own architecture funnies.

Robert A.M. Stern Awarded the AIA's 2017 Topaz Medallion

12:35 - 13 December, 2016
Tour Carpe Diem / Robert A.M. Stern Architects. Image © Peter Aaron / OTTO
Tour Carpe Diem / Robert A.M. Stern Architects. Image © Peter Aaron / OTTO

Following the announcements of the 2017 AIA Gold Medal and Architecture Firm of the Year winners, The American Institute of Architects (AIA) has announced the winners of three other national awards: the Edward C. Kemper Award,the Topaz Medallion, and the Whitney M. Young Jr. Award.

Reflections on Architecture, Society and Politics: Social and Cultural Tectonics in the 21st Century

02:30 - 20 October, 2016
Reflections on Architecture, Society and Politics: Social and Cultural Tectonics in the 21st Century, Courtesy of Unknown
Courtesy of Unknown

Reflections on Architecture, Society and Politics brings together a series of thirteen interview-articles by Graham Cairns in collaboration with some of the most prominent polemic thinkers and critical practitioners from the fields of architecture and the social sciences, including Noam Chomsky, Peggy Deamer, Robert A.M. Stern, Daniel Libeskind and Kenneth Frampton.

6 Architects Share What It’s Like to Build in New York

12:00 - 18 February, 2016

In the latest video from the Louisiana Channel, six architects – Bjarke Ingels, Liz Diller, Daniel Libeskind, Robert A.M. Stern, Thom Mayne, and Craig Dykers – share what it’s like to build in New York. From the High Line to the 9/11 Memorial Museum Pavilion at Ground Zero, the architects each describe their approach to designing in the iconic city.

Deborah Berke Named Dean of Yale School of Architecture

15:26 - 25 September, 2015
Deborah Berke Named Dean of Yale School of Architecture, Deborah Berke. Image © Winnie Au for Deborah Berke Partners
Deborah Berke. Image © Winnie Au for Deborah Berke Partners

Deborah Berke of Deborah Berke Partners has been appointed as the new dean of the Yale School of Architecture. Having served as an adjunct professor at Yale since 1987, Berke will be the first woman to lead the school. She will assume her position on July 1, 2016, during the architecture school's 100th anniversary, succeeding Robert A.M. Stern's 18-year term. 

Video: Robert A.M. Stern on Designing Background Buildings and The Limestone Jesus

00:00 - 14 November, 2014

"We have lots of silly buildings being built, in my opinion. The buildings should not look like Lady Gaga,” stated Robert A.M. Stern in the latest installment by the Louisiana Channel

Robert A.M. Stern Reportedly Set to Retire from Yale in 2016

00:00 - 10 November, 2014
Robert A.M. Stern Reportedly Set to Retire from Yale in 2016, Robert A.M. Stern
Robert A.M. Stern

After serving as dean at the Yale School of Architecture for nearly two decades, Robert A.M. Stern is reportedly stepping down. According to Yale Daily News, faculty and administrative staff members have indicated that Stern will be retiring when his term as dean concludes in Spring 2016. “[Stern] took [the school] from a place where people were not paying attention to it many years ago — he has brought incredible international attention to the school,” Professor Michelle Addington stated in regards to Stern's widespread influence as dean. “He has given me the opportunity to rethink my subject, and that doesn’t happen at too many places.” More information, here

Robert A.M. Stern Remembers Charles Moore

00:00 - 30 July, 2014
Robert A.M. Stern Remembers Charles Moore,  Moore House, Orinda, California, 1962. Image Courtesy of Morley Baer
Moore House, Orinda, California, 1962. Image Courtesy of Morley Baer

Robert A.M. Stern, founder of his eponymous firm and dean of the Yale School of Architecture, remembers his colleague and friend Charles Moore in this article originally published by Metropolis Magazine. Stern writes about the details most would never know — including what it was like to be a guest in Moore's home and his eating habits. Read on to learn about and their relationship over the years and Stern's admiration for Moore.

As an architecture student at Yale editing Perspecta 9/10, I first met Charles Moore by telephone and through correspondence. I had come across his amazing early projects in the Italian magazine Casabella, and was intrigued by what I read about him and his partners — especially in a provocative essay by Donlyn Lyndon. I got in touch with Charles and he volunteered that he was interested in writing about Disneyland for the journal, leading to the publication of his justifiably famous article, "You Have to Pay for the Public Life," as well as a portfolio of projects by his firm Moore, Lyndon, Turnbull, Whitaker.

Robert A. M. Stern Advocates the Return of the Garden Suburb

00:00 - 1 May, 2014
Robert A. M. Stern Advocates the Return of the Garden Suburb, Disney-backed garden suburb, Celebration, Fla.. Image Courtesy of Robert A.M. Stern via NYT
Disney-backed garden suburb, Celebration, Fla.. Image Courtesy of Robert A.M. Stern via NYT

The modern suburb has become an unruly sprawl, homogenous in style and over-dependent on the automobile. However, according to Robert A. M. Stern's new manifesto “Paradise Planned: The Garden Suburb and the Modern City,” there is a superior alternative for suburban development that could attract millennials and preserve quality of life in terms of health, economic savings, and physical safety: the centrally planned, pedestrian-friendly garden suburb. You can learn more about Stern’s 1,072 page manifesto on the garden suburb in this article by the New York Times.

Robert A.M. Stern on His Latest Publication: The "Definitive Text" on Suburbia

10:30 - 21 February, 2014
Robert A.M. Stern on His Latest Publication: The "Definitive Text" on Suburbia, Jardim América, 1911–29, Brazil. Developed on 260 acres of land on São Paulo’s southern and western outskirts, the neighborhood remains highly desirable. Image Courtesy of Monacelli Press/Robert A.M. Stern Architects
Jardim América, 1911–29, Brazil. Developed on 260 acres of land on São Paulo’s southern and western outskirts, the neighborhood remains highly desirable. Image Courtesy of Monacelli Press/Robert A.M. Stern Architects

In this interview, originally published in Metropolis Magazine as "The Charms of Suburbia", Martin Pedersen interviews Robert A.M. Stern about his new book, "Paradise Planned: The Garden Suburb and the Modern City". Pedersen's interview delves into the history behind the Garden Suburb - a typology that is distinct from the stereotype of suburban sprawl.

Robert A.M. Stern is nothing if not counterintuitive. How else do you explain—in an increasingly digital and urban-centric world—his recently released book, a 1,072-page tome, containing more than 3,000 images, on the history of the garden suburb? Paradise Planned: The Garden Suburb and the Modern City (the Monacelli Press, 2013) was written with longtime, in-house collaborators David Fishman and Jacob Tilove, who also worked with Stern on the fifth volume of  the architect’s epic New York series. 

Paradise Planned is similarly expansive. “The book grew like Topsy,” Stern says. “We’d think we had all the examples down, and a new one would pop up. So it just got bigger and bigger. And I thought: if we’re going to do this book, we really ought to do it as the definitive text. Now, it’s not forever text. People will always be adding things. But this is a pretty comprehensive view.” I recently talked to Stern about his new book, the folly of “landscape urbanism,” and the lessons learned from the garden suburb.

Read on for the rest of the interview

Robert A.M. Stern: Old-Fashioned yet Unfazed

00:00 - 17 November, 2013
Robert A.M. Stern: Old-Fashioned yet Unfazed, Robert A.M Stern. Image
Robert A.M Stern. Image

In the mutable world of architecture it's easy to get distracted by the trendy new thing, be it the tallest tower or the "blobbiest" form. Robert A. M. Stern (Dean of the Yale School of Architecture and a practicing architect in his own right), on the other hand, remains purposefully old-fashioned (to the point of becoming obsolete). In an exquisitely written article for the New York MagazineJustin Davidson reports that, despite the mockery of his colleagues, Stern seems unfazed. If his architecture has the power to inspire, he says, then he's done his job. Read the full must-see article here. 

Driehaus Prize / Robert A.M. Stern

09:30 - 21 December, 2010

We’re always excited to bring you news on the latest awarded architects for their contemporary achievements and advancement of the field – whether it be our coverage of the Pritzker, AIA Honor Awards, or the Aga Khan awards, to name a few.   Yet, the Richard H. Driehaus Prize is one prize that recognizes architects whose work embraces the ideas and theories of the past.  Specifically, the prize is bestowed upon those who work  ”embodies the principals of traditional and classical architecture and urbanism in contemporary society.”   Robert A. M. Stern, dean of Yale School of Architecture and principal of his firm, has been named the 2011 recipient of the Driehaus Prize for his commitment to incorporating classical theories into his projects of all scales.  According to Stern, the firm is grounded in the belief of “…continuity of tradition and strive in our work to create order out of the often chaotic present by entering into a dialogue with the past and with the spirit of the places in which we build.”

More about the award after the break.