Norman Foster Revisits New York's Hearst Tower With Drones

00:00 - 16 January, 2015

To mark the 10th anniversary of the topping out of New York City's Hearst TowerLord Foster returned in order to narrate a short film shedding new light on the building with the aid of camera drones. The 46 storey building - which is integrated into a 6 storey base brick structure designed by Joseph Urban in 1928 - was "one of the most sustainable buildings of its time." Now, ten years later, this footage captures spectacular new views of the main atrium.

Vincent Laforet's Images of New York From Above Will Take Your Breath Away

00:00 - 14 January, 2015
Vincent Laforet's Images of New York From Above Will Take Your Breath Away, © Vincent Laforet
© Vincent Laforet

Something he has “dreamed of capturing for decades,” Pulitzer Prize-winning photographer Vincent Laforet has released a stunning set of images that captures his hometown of New York in a way that has never before been seen. Taken from a nauseating 7500-feet above the city, Laforet’s “Gotham 7.5K” series reveals the unrelenting, pulsating energy that radiates from the Big Apple’s city grid. 

All the images and the making-of video, after the break. 

© Vincent Laforet © Vincent Laforet © Vincent Laforet © Vincent Laforet +12

New York's "City of Dreams" Competition Selects Two Winners

00:00 - 14 January, 2015
New York's "City of Dreams" Competition Selects Two Winners, © BanG Studio
© BanG Studio

Two winners have been announced for the fifth annual cycle of New York’s “City of Dreams” competition: the “Billion Oyster Pavilion” by locally-based BanG Studio and “Organic Growth” by Izaskun Chinchilla Architects of Madrid and London. Pending approvals and fundraising, both pavilions will be assembled on Governors Island and open to the public for the summer 2015 season. The winning pavilions, after the break.

Video: Santiago Calatrava On His Design For Ground Zero's Only Non-Secular Building

00:00 - 9 January, 2015

In a film for the BBC Magazine, Spanish architect Santiago Calatrava talks through his designs for the new St. Nicholas Church - the only non-secular building on the 9/11 Memorial site. The building, which broke ground last year, has been described by Calatrava as a "tiny jewel" for lower Manhattan, comprising of a white Vermont marble shrine sat beneath a translucent central cupola that is illuminated from within. The new church, of Greek Orthodox denomination, replaces a church of the same name which was destroyed during the attacks of . It is sited close to its original location on 130 Liberty Street, overlooking the National September 11 Memorial park and museum. With the building set to open in early 2016, Calatrava discusses the key conceptual ideas and references behind its unique, controversial design.

Chefs Club by Food & Wine / Rockwell Group

01:00 - 6 January, 2015
Chefs Club by Food & Wine / Rockwell Group, © Emily Andrews
© Emily Andrews
  • Architects

  • Location

    The Puck Building, 295 Lafayette Street, New York, NY 10012, USA
  • Area

    6000.0 ft2
  • Project Year

    2014
  • Photographs

© Emily Andrews © Emily Andrews © Emily Andrews © Emily Andrews +14

Northwest Corner Building / Moneo Brock Studio

01:00 - 3 January, 2015
Northwest Corner Building / Moneo Brock Studio, © Michael Moran
© Michael Moran
  • Architects

  • Location

    Broadway y 120th Streett, New York, NY 10010, USA
  • Design Architect

    Rafael Moneo Valles Arquitecto, Belen Moneo and Jeff Brock
  • Moneo Brock Studio project team

    Benjamin Llana, Spencer Leaf, Andrés Barron
  • Associate Architect

    Davis Brody Bond, New York, NY, U.S.A. William Paxson, Partner-in-Charge
  • DBBA project team

    Mayine Lynn Yu, David Haft, Fernando Hausch-Fen, Gene Sparling, Mario Samara, Clover Linne, Dohhee Zhoung, Veronique Ross, y James Paxson
  • Project Management

    Columbia University Facilities – Capital Project Management
  • Area

    188000.0 ft2
  • Project Year

    2010
  • Photographs

© Michael Moran © Michael Moran © Michael Moran © Michael Moran +27

Lincoln Memorial and Flatiron to Join LEGO® Architecture Series

00:00 - 1 January, 2015
Lincoln Memorial and Flatiron to Join LEGO® Architecture Series, © LEGO®
© LEGO®

LEGO® has unveiled the latest buildings to join their architecture series: the Washington D.C. Lincoln Memorial and the New York City Flatiron Building. Both will be released in 2015. 

The Lincoln Memorial, a national monument honoring the 16th President of the United States, was designed by Henry Bacon and features a sculpture of Lincoln by Daniel Chester French. The Flatiron Building, originally known as the Fuller Building, is a landmark Manhattan skyscraper designed by Daniel Burnham Frederick Dinkelberg.

The news was released following the grand opening of a new LEGO® Brand Store adjacent to the Flatiron. 

More images of the new LEGO® sets, after the break. 

New York's Storefront Launches "Street Architecture" Competition

01:00 - 28 December, 2014
New York's Storefront Launches "Street Architecture" Competition, Courtesy of Storefront
Courtesy of Storefront

On the occasion of Ideas City 2015, the biennial Festival created to explore the future city and to effect change, Storefront for Art and Architecture, along with the New Museum and the New York City Department of Transportation, is launching a competition for the design and construction of an outdoor structure—a work of "Street Architecture" that facilitates new forms of collective gathering and engagement with the city.

Why Are There Still No Built Traces of New York's Tech Industry?

00:00 - 27 December, 2014
Why Are There Still No Built Traces of New York's Tech Industry?, 837 Washington Street. ImageImage via New York YIMBY
837 Washington Street. ImageImage via New York YIMBY

For many architects, the chance to make an impression on the landscape of New York City is a sign of distinction, an indication that they have "made the big time." But it's not just architects who have this desire: for decades, the city's big industrial players have also striven to leave their mark. However in this article, originally posted on New York YIMBY as "How New York City is Robbing Itself of the Tech Industry’s Built Legacy," Stephen Smith examines where it's all gone wrong for the city's latest industry players.

Strolling through the streets of Manhattan’s business neighborhoods, you can pick out the strata of the city’s built commercial heritage, deposited over generations by industries long gone. From the Garment District’s heavy pyramidal avenue office towers and side street lofts, dropped by the garment industry in the 1920s, to the modernist towers like Lever House and the Seagram Building, erected on Park and Fifth Avenues during the post-war years by the country’s giant consumer goods companies, each epoch of industry left the city with a layer of commercial architecture, enduring long after the businesses were acquired and the booms turned to bust.

But 50 or 100 years into the future, when our grandchildren and great-grandchildren stroll through the neighborhoods of Midtown South that are today thick with technology and creative firms, they are not likely to find much left over from the likes of Facebook or Google. There will be no equivalent of Grand Central or Penn Station, Terminal City or the Hotel Pennsylvania, left over from the early 20th century railroad tycoons, or SoHo’s cast iron buildings, developed by speculators seeking to feed the growing textile and dry-goods trades of the late 19th century. Perhaps unique among New York’s large industries, the tech and creative tenants that have become the darlings of the current market cycle are leaving very little behind for future generations to admire.

INABA Frames Empire State Building with Animated "New York Light" Installation

01:00 - 22 December, 2014
INABA Frames Empire State Building with Animated "New York Light" Installation, © Zhonghan Huang
© Zhonghan Huang

This holiday season, wedged between two New York City icons - the Flatiron and Empire State building - stands the #NewYorkLight public art installation by Brooklyn-based INABA. A magnificent place to experience the Manhattan grid, the installation frames a unique and uninterrupted view of the skyline due to the clearing of Madison Square Park. 

© Naho Kubota © Zhonghan Huang © Naho Kubota © Naho Kubota +14

In Defense of Santiago Calatrava

00:00 - 21 December, 2014
In Defense of Santiago Calatrava, Florida Polytechnic Sciencie, Innovation and Technology Campus. Image © Alan Karchmer for Santiago Calatrava
Florida Polytechnic Sciencie, Innovation and Technology Campus. Image © Alan Karchmer for Santiago Calatrava

In recent years, few architects have had a tougher time in the media than Santiago Calatrava. Whether it's his repeated legal battles over leaking roofs and peeling facades, the unceremonious death of his Chicago Spire project, or the media firestorm over his New York Transportation Hub that is $2 billion over budget, Calatrava has become a poster boy for those who criticize the supposed arrogance of today's architects. However, in an engaging article for FastCo Design, Karrie Jacobs responds to what seems to be "a concerted effort to shore up his reputation," coming to the defense of this "unreconstructed aesthete." Read the article in full here.

Interior Renders of Robert AM Stern's 520 Park Avenue, NYC's Most Expensive Apartment Building

00:00 - 20 December, 2014
Interior Renders of Robert AM Stern's 520 Park Avenue, NYC's Most Expensive Apartment Building, © 2014 Zeckendorf Development LLC via 520parkavenue.com
© 2014 Zeckendorf Development LLC via 520parkavenue.com

This news article was originally published by 6sqft.

Robert A.M. Stern‘s 520 Park Avenue has already been called “the next 15 Central Park West,” and like its Stern predecessor, 520 is an ultra-luxury development with a stately façade wrapped in stone. Set to be completed in 2016, it will rise 51 stories high, but contain just 31 units, one of which is the $130 million penthouse, the city’s most expensive apartment. And though most of the attention has been on “the greatest apartment on the Upper East Side,” the fanfare has now shifted to the first batch of interior renderings for the building.

520 Park’s full website is now live, and not surprisingly, the residences have classic layouts, impressive Central Park views, and a host of high-end amenities.

© 2014 Zeckendorf Development LLC via 520parkavenue.com © 2014 Zeckendorf Development LLC via 520parkavenue.com © 2014 Zeckendorf Development LLC via 520parkavenue.com © 2014 Zeckendorf Development LLC via 520parkavenue.com +8

Mariner Harbor Branch Library / A*PT ARCHITECTURE

01:00 - 18 December, 2014
Mariner Harbor Branch Library / A*PT ARCHITECTURE, © Albert Vecerka / Esto
© Albert Vecerka / Esto
  • Architects

  • Location

    Mariners Harbor, Staten Island, NY, USA
  • Design Team

    Anna Torriani, AIA; Lorenzo Pagnamenta, AIA; Wasmiya Tan; Raffaele Stefani; Damien Romanens; Nam Suk Oh; Juan Carlos Salas Ballestin; Caterina Inderbitzin; Petya Ivanova; Felix Lederberger; Roxane Bervini; Anais Iglesias; Nuria Forques.
  • Area

    10000.0 ft2
  • Project Year

    2014
  • Photographs

© Albert Vecerka / Esto © Albert Vecerka / Esto © Albert Vecerka / Esto © Albert Vecerka / Esto +17

Davis Brody Bond and KieranTimberlake Chosen to Design New NYU Facility

00:00 - 18 December, 2014
Davis Brody Bond and KieranTimberlake Chosen to Design New NYU Facility, US Embassy in London / KieranTimberlake Architects
US Embassy in London / KieranTimberlake Architects

As the culmination of a five-month selection process, New York University (NYU) has announced that Davis Brody Bond and KieranTimberlake will be designing its major new facility along Mercer Street between Houston and Bleecker in New York. The facility's many uses will include classrooms, teaching spaces for performing arts, a state-of-the-art sports facility, and student and faculty housing. 

Stereotank Designs Heart-Beating Urban Drum for Times Square

00:00 - 15 December, 2014
Stereotank Designs Heart-Beating Urban Drum for Times Square, © Stereotank
© Stereotank

Come February 9, New York City will be celebrating the opening of its seventh annual Valentine’s Day installation in Times Square. As part of Times Square Alliance’s heart design competition, Brooklyn- based and Venezuelan-born firm Stereotank will be constructing a heart-beating urban drum in hopes that it will bring together New Yorkers through music. 

Studio Gang Tapped to Extend American Museum of Natural History

00:00 - 14 December, 2014
Studio Gang Tapped to Extend American Museum of Natural History, American Museum of Natural History. Image Courtesy of Wikipedia
American Museum of Natural History. Image Courtesy of Wikipedia

Chicago’s Studio Gang Architects have been selected to design a new Center for Science, Education and Innovation for the American Museum of Natural History in New York. Named after its largest donor, the $325 million Gilder Center will include 218,000-square-feet of existing and new space. It is slated to open on Columbus Avenue at 79th Street on the west side of the Museum campus, in conjunction with its 150th anniversary in 2019–2020.

SHoP Architects Reveal Restoration Plan for New York's Seaport District

00:00 - 14 December, 2014
SHoP Architects Reveal Restoration Plan for New York's Seaport District, © SHoP Architects
© SHoP Architects

SHoP Architects have revealed a mixed use proposal to pedestrianize New York City’s historic Seaport District. Extending the Manhattan grid out into the waterfront, the scheme seeks to harmonize pedestrian infrastructure and increase access to the shoreline, while proposing a 500-foot luxury residential tower by developer Howard Hughes Corporation that would jut out into the harbor. More about the proposal, after the break. 

Why New York Shouldn't be a City for the One Percent

00:00 - 12 December, 2014
Why New York Shouldn't be a City for the One Percent, View above Central Park looking south towards “Billionaire's Row” towers, with Midtown towers in background and various Financial District and Downtown Brooklyn Towers in far background. Image Courtesy of CityRealty
View above Central Park looking south towards “Billionaire's Row” towers, with Midtown towers in background and various Financial District and Downtown Brooklyn Towers in far background. Image Courtesy of CityRealty

In recent years, it's been difficult to miss the spate of supertall, super-thin towers on the rise in Manhattan. Everyone knows the individual projects: 432 Park Avenue, One57, the Nordstrom Tower, the MoMA Tower. But, when a real estate company released renders of the New York skyline in 2018, it forced New Yorkers to consider for the first time the combined effect of all this new real estate. In this opinion article, originally published by Metropolis Magazine as "On New York's Skyscraper Boom and the Failure of Trickle-Down Urbanism," Joshua K Leon argues that the case for a city of the one percent doesn't stand up under scrutiny.

What would a city owned by the one-percent look like?  

New renderings for CityRealty get us part way there, illustrating how Manhattan may appear in 2018. The defining feature will be a bumper crop of especially tall, slender skyscrapers piercing the skyline like postmodern boxes, odd stalagmites, and upside-down syringes. What they share in common is sheer unadulterated scale and a core clientele of uncompromising plutocrats.