MoMA PS1 YAP 2014 Runner-Up: Underberg / LAMAS

Looking back from the stage to the barrel vault, the party’s in full swing. Image © LAMAS

Wouldn’t it be nice to save a little cold for when it’s hot (and maybe a little warmth for when it’s cold)? This was the premise of LAMAS’s PS1 runner-up proposal, UnderbergUnderberg is an urban iceberg. Though it isn’t a native New Yorker, it has adapted to its new home in New York City and its crevasses take on the form of the avenues and streets of the gridiron.

Underberg was one of five proposals shortlisted for the annual MoMA PS1 Young Architect’s Program (YAP) competition, which was won by the Living’s compostable brick tower. More on this proposal, after the break…

MoMA PS1 YAP 2014 Runner-Up: Mirror Mirror / Collective-LOK

© Collective-LOK

A vision by Jon Lott (PARA-Project), William O’Brien Jr. (WOJR), and Michael Kubo (over,under)Collective–LOK’s compelling proposal to reimagine PS1’s triangular courtyard with a billowing “urban mirror” was one of five finalists shortlisted for the annual competition’s 15th edition. Though the Living’s compostable brick tower was ultimately crowned winner, the Collective-LOK’s Mirror Mirror was an intriguing proposal that transcended the boundaries of the site.

Dear MoMA, Couldn’t the Nouvel Tower Save the American Folk Art Museum?

© Flickr CC User Dan Nguyen

In this Metropolis Magazine post on MoMA‘s planned demolition of the American Folk Art Museum, Karrie Jacobs asks a strangely unasked question: How has the Nouvel Tower – in its day the most controversial of MoMA’s expansion plans - not been brought into the debate? The Jean Nouvel-designed tower was predicated up a circulation plan that, by necessity, ignored the (then occupied) Folk Art Museum entirely. Why is this plan no longer possible? Read the fascinating argument here.

Behind “Hy-Fi”: The Organic, Compostable Tower That Won MoMA PS1′s Young Architects Program 2014

The Living’s Hy-Fi, winning design of the 2014 Young Architects Program. The Museum of Modern Art and MoMAPS1. Image © The Living

This article, published by Metropolis Magazine as “Behind the Living’s “100% Organic” Pavilion for MoMA PS1“, goes behind the plans for this year’s PS1 Young Architects Program’s winning design, “Hy-Fi” – looking at the compostable eco-bricks which make the design possible.

“It all starts on local farms with waste corn stalks,” says Sam Harrington of Ecovative, who will help build this year’s winning entry for the MoMA PS1 Young Architect’s Program. Hy-Fi, designed by the -based firm The Living, will be made of bricks that are entirely organic and ultimately, compostable. A good chunk of that material is corn stalks, stained clay-red with an organic dye from Shabd Simon-Alexander and Audrey Louisere . The rest is mycelium—mushroom roots to you and me—that will hold the corn stalks together as they cohere into a molded shape. The technology, developed by Ecovative in 2007, has so far been used as a packaging material. “But we love the chance to try something bold, and that’s what PS1 is all about,” Harrington says.

Read more about the bricks behind Hy-Fi after the break

MoMA to Preserve Folk Art Facade

© Flickr CC User Dan Nguyen

Though it has been confirmed that Diller Scofidio + Renfro’s Museum of Modern Art expansion will result in the demise of Tod Williams and Billie Tsien Architects’ American Folk Art Museum, the New York Times has confirmed that the beloved copper-bronze facade will be preserved.

“We will take the facade down, piece by piece, and we will store it,” Glenn D. Lowry, the director of the Museum of Modern Art, said in an interview. “We have made no decision about what happens subsequently, other than the fact that we’ll have it and it will be preserved.”

Glenn Lowry on American Folk Art Museum: The Decision Has Been Made

Rendering of the garden entrance of the new , by Diller Scofidio + Renfro. Image Courtesy of

Yesterday, Glenn Lowry, director of the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), and Elizabeth Diller, principal of Diller Scofidio + Renfro, presented their plans for the MoMA expansion to an audience in , insisting  - once again - that they require the demolition of the American Folk Art Museum

The presentation was part of a larger event, “A Conversation on the Museum of Modern Art’s Plan for Expansion,” presented by The Architectural League, the Municipal Art Society, and the American Institute of Architects New York Chapter. After Lowry and Diller reiterated their case, a panel of experts – including the editor of Architectural Record, Cathleen McGuigan, and critic Nicolai Ouroussoff – gave their opinions on the subject (some panelists spousing particularly anti-MoMA sentiments). ArchDaily was there to catch the conversation; read on after the break for the highlights. 

Liz Diller on MoMA Expansion: We’d Be Against Us Too “If We Didn’t Know All the Details That We Know”

Image of / One of DS + R’s early renderings of the expansion. Image © Iwan Baan / Courtesy of

In a must-read interview with Christopher Hawthorne of the Los Angeles Times, Liz Diller defends her firm, Diller Scofidio + Renfro, and their design of the MoMA expansion.

Hawthorne asks some great, insightful questions: from whether or not architecture should be considered ephemeral to whether or not idiosyncratic architecture is more vulnerable to change. Diller responds with some fascinating points, claiming that if DS+R’s ICA museum in Boston faced demolition, she’d understand because of the possibility that “at a certain point [a building] takes on another identity.” But perhaps the most poignant response is the one that she gives regarding the maelstrom of negative criticism surrounding the demolition of the Folk Art Museum, saying, “We would be on the same side if we didn’t know all the details that we know.” To learn more about those “details,” read on for excerpts from the interview…

Critical Round-Up: Reaction to the Folk Art Museum’s Demolition, MoMA’s Expansion

American Folk Art Museum exterior. Image © Flickr CC User Dan Nguyen

The flurry of criticism that erupted when announced its plans to demolish the American Folk Art Museum (in its new plans for expansion, designed by ) has yet to settle. After the break, we offer a more complete round-up of the critics’ reactions – including Paul Goldberger’s of Vanity Fair, Michael Kimmelman’s for The New York Times, and more…

YAP 2013: bam! Debuts ‘He’ at MAXXI

He has made his debut in the piazza. As the winner of the Young Architects Program () in Rome, Turin-based studio Bam! Bottega di Architettura metropolitan has transformed the concrete facade of the Zaha Hadid-designed museum into a visual spectacular with the installation of a yellow, translucent and aerostatic prism. 

MoMA Enlists Six Architect Teams to Develop Proposals for Expanding Megacities

Morro do Alemão, Rio de Janeiro. 2012.. Image © Pedro Rivera, RUA Arquitetos

The (MoMA) has collaborated with Vienna’s Museum of Applied Arts (MAK) to launch a 14-month initiative that will examine new architectural possibilities that address the rapid and uneven growth of six global metropolises: , Rio de Janeiro, Mumbai, Lagos, Hong Kong, and Istanbul.

Organized by Pedro Gadanho, Curator, Department of Architecture and Design, Uneven Growth: Tactical Urbanisms for Expanding Megacities enlists six interdisciplinary teams of international architecture and urbanism scholars, experts, and practitioners to participate in a series of workshops, with each team focusing on a specific city. 

AD Classics: The Museum of Modern Art

View of the gallery complex from the Sculpture Garden. Image © Timothy Hursley

The entrance to the Museum of Modern Art is tucked beneath a demure facade of granite and glass in Midtown Manhattan. Its clean, regular planes mark Yoshio Taniguchi’s 2004 addition to the ’s sequence of facades, which he preserved as a record of its form. Taniguchi’s contribution sits beside the 1984 residential tower by Cesar Pelli and Associates, followed by Philip Goodwin and ’s original 1939 building, then Philip Johnson’s 1964 addition. Taniguchi was hired in 1997 to expand the Museum’s space and synthesize its disparate elements. His elegant, minimal solution presents a contemporary face for the MoMA while adhering to its Modernist roots.

In Pursuit of Architecture: A Conference on Buildings and Ideas

To mark its 10th anniversary and 29th issue, Log presents In Pursuit of Architecture, a conference featuring recent built work selected from an open, international call for submissions. Join architects and critics for a daylong discussion of architectural ideas, what it takes to build them, and how we measure the cultural value of architecture.

Some of the offices that will be present include C+S architects, LAN, Neil M. Denari Architects, Preston Scott Cohen, Reiser + Umemoto, and UNStudio. For complete details, please click here.

Title: In Pursuit of Architecture: A conference on buildings and ideas
Website: http://www.anycorp.com/inpursuit/
Organizers: Log
From: Sat, 21 Sep 2013 10:00
Until: Sat, 21 Sep 2013 17:00
Venue: The
Address: 11 West 53rd Street, , NY 10019, USA

MoMA’s Le Corbusier Exhibit is Must-See, Says Critic Alexandra Lange

Le Corbusier (Charles-Edouard Jeanneret) with Pierre Jeanneret. Villa Savoye Poissy-sur-Seine, France. 1929–31. Wood, aluminum, and plastic, 16 x 34 x 32″ (40.6 x 86.4 x 81.3 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, . Purchase. © 2012 Artists Rights Society (ARS), /ADAGP, Paris/FLC. Image Courtesy of MoMA.org

Although critiquing the exhibit for some “critical flaws” – namely the choice of theme and the lack of explanatory text – ’s review for The New Yorker praises the MoMA’s Le Corbusier exhibit, “An Atlas of Modern Landscapes,” as a “must-see” thanks to its varied displays, which show “the terrific span of Le Corbusier’s career in time, space, and scale [...] If current architects take anything from the exhibition [...]  it should be the power of those big, gestural drawings, where visual and verbal argument vividly come together.” Read the rest of Lange’s critique at The New Yorker. 

MoMA Releases First Storybook: “Young Frank, Architect”

Cover of Young Frank, Architect, published by The Museum of Modern Art

Inspiring builders of all ages, MoMA has released their first storybook, following the adventures of a young, City architect and his architect grandfather: Young Frank and Old Frank. The creative pair – with matching bow ties, straw boater hats and, of course, -inspired glasses – optimistically views the world as an endless supply of inspiration and possibilities. Everything, from macaroni to old boxes, inspires them to create – especially after discovering the works of Frank Gehry and Frank Lloyd Wright at The Museum of Modern Art. Young Frank, Architect was written by the renowned children’s author and illustrator Frank Viva. More information can be found here on MoMA.

AD Round Up: Unbuilt Classics

The Plug-In City by Peter Cook, 1964. Image via Archigram Archives

This AD Round Up is dedicated to unbuilt classics, a selection of projects and ideas that, although never built, contributed greatly to the canon of twentieth century architecture. In 1920, Buckminister Fuller designed the Dymaxion House, which displayed forward-thinking innovations in sustainability and prefabrication. In 1924, Le Corbusier’s radical plan for Ville Radieuse (The Radiant City) had an extensive influence upon modern urban planning and led to the development of new high-density housing typologies. In the same year Friedrick Kiesler introduced his “Endless House“, the basis for his subsequent manifesto of Correalism. Eight years later in 1932, and Henry-Russell Hitchcock curated the “Modern Architecture: International exhibition” at the MoMA, introducing the emerging International Style and laying the principles for Modern architecture. And finally, one of Archigram’s most famous utopian visions, the Plug-In City, proposed by Peter Cook in 1964, offered a fascinating new approach to urbanism and reversed traditional perceptions of infrastructure’s role in the city.

UMWELT Named 2013 Winner of YAP Constructo in Santiago

Courtesy of UMWELT

Santiago-based studio UMWELT (Arturo Scheidegger & Ignacio Garcia Partarrieu) has been named as winner of the 2013 Young Architect’s Program () in Chile. Their winning proposal, ‘AMBIENT 35 60’, which is scheduled for completion in March 2014, will occupy a 20 x 27 meter site in Santiago’s Parque Araucano with a network of 35, climatically responsive spatial frames that will provide a ‘container for artwork and events.’ 

More on ‘AMBIENT 35 60’ after the break…

SO? Celebrates the Opening of ‘Sky Spotting Stop’ in Istanbul

© Muhsin Akgün; Courtesy of Modern

Though temporarily postponed due to the Gezi Park protests, SO? Architecture and Ideas has celebrated the opening of their winning entry – Sky Spotting Stop - for the 2013 Young Architects Program () at Istanbul Modern in Turkey. Offering refuge from the historic city’s busy streets, the fragmented canopy of reflective circular discs invites visitors to “sit, rest, gather, play, or skyspot” while overlooking the mouth of the Bosphorus.

CODA’s Skateboard Scrap ‘Party Wall’ Kickstarts MoMA’s Summer Music Series

© Zachary Tyler Newton

The Museum of Modern Art has kicked off the popular Warm Up Summer Music series in the courtyard of with the grand opening of Party Wall. The towering , designed by Ithaca-based studio CODA, was the winning proposal of the 14th annual Young Architects Program in which provides emerging architects a chance to construct an innovative project as long as shades, cools and seats visitors.

With a porous skin made of woven skateboard scraps, the experimental structure has successfully met the challenge by providing a shaded refuge for the crowds with refreshing cooling stations and detachable wooden seats.

See Party Wall in action after the break…