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Snøhetta

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Gehry, Foster, Piano Lead Star-Studded Shortlist in London Centre for Music Competition

12:25 - 10 July, 2017
Gehry, Foster, Piano Lead Star-Studded Shortlist in London Centre for Music Competition, Barbican Hall, the current home of the London Symphony Orchestra. Image © Wikimedia user FA2010. Image is in the public domain
Barbican Hall, the current home of the London Symphony Orchestra. Image © Wikimedia user FA2010. Image is in the public domain

Six internationally-acclaimed teams have been selected as finalists in a competition to design a new home for London Symphony Orchestra and Guildhall School of Music & Drama to be known as the Centre for Music London.

Planned to contain a world-class concert hall, education, training and digital spaces, top-grade facilities for audiences and performers, and a number of supporting commercial areas, the Centre for Music building will become a new landmark within the heart of London, aimed at becoming “a place of welcome, participation, discovery and learning fit for the digital age.”

Snøhetta Envisions Riverwalk Masterplan on Industrial Site at Oregon's Willamette Falls

11:20 - 1 June, 2017
Snøhetta Envisions Riverwalk Masterplan on Industrial Site at Oregon's Willamette Falls, The Woolen Mill Alcove and Public Yard. Image © Snøhetta
The Woolen Mill Alcove and Public Yard. Image © Snøhetta

Snøhetta has unveiled plans for a new riverwalk masterplan located alongside Oregon’s Willamette Falls – the second largest waterfall by volume in North America – that will open up the attraction to public access for the first time in over 150 years. Selected to lead the project in 2015 alongside Mayer/Reed and DIALOG, Snøhetta’s scheme is the result of a 2-year design process developed as a collaboration with the city and thousands of individual community members.

The resulting plan calls for the reutilization and augmentation of existing industrial structures on the 22-acre site, giving visitors the opportunity to experience the falls and its rugged basalt shoreline and reconnecting Oregon City to its historic waterfront.

The Mill O Visitor Center and Pipe Chase Porch. Image © Snøhetta The Woolen Mill Overlook. Image © Snøhetta The Clarifier Landscape and PGE Dam Promenade. Image © Snøhetta The Mill H Grove and Overlook. Image © Snøhetta +15

Harvard HouseZero - A Retrofit Response to Climate Change

14:00 - 27 May, 2017
Harvard HouseZero - A Retrofit Response to Climate Change , ZeroHouse aims to set a new benchmark for sustainable retrofitting. Image Courtesy of Snøhetta/Plompmozes
ZeroHouse aims to set a new benchmark for sustainable retrofitting. Image Courtesy of Snøhetta/Plompmozes

As part of a global, interdisciplinary effort to tackle climate change, architects are devoting resources towards optimizing the energy efficiency of buildings old and new. This effort is more than justified, given that buildings account for almost 40% of UK and US emissions. Although sustainability is now a hallmark of many new architectural schemes, the energy inefficiency of structures from the 18th and 19th centuries still contribute to global carbon emissions on a vast scale.

In order to address the challenge of intelligently retrofitting existing buildings, the Harvard Center for Green Buildings (CGBC) at the Harvard University Graduate School of Design, in collaboration with Snøhetta and Skanska Technology, are retrofitting the CGBC’s headquarters in a pre-1940s timber-framed building, aiming to create one of the world’s most ambitious sustainable buildings. HouseZero is driven by uncompromising performance targets, such as 100% natural ventilation, 100% daylight autonomy, and almost zero energy required for heating and cooling. The result will be a prototype for ultra-efficiency, reducing reliance on energy-intensive technology whilst creating a comfortable indoor environment.

An array of features include PV cells, a heat pump, window shrouds and a solar vent. Image Courtesy of Snøhetta The existing 1940's timber-framed house will become the CGBC HQ. Image Courtesy of Snøhetta Despite its environmental provisions, ZeroHouse also places an emphasis on user-friendly design. Image Courtesy of Snøhetta/Plompmozes ZeroHouse aims to become completely energy autonomous. Image Courtesy of Snøhetta/Plompmozes +5

Times Square Celebrates Grand Opening of Snøhetta-Designed Transformation

14:30 - 20 April, 2017
Times Square Celebrates Grand Opening of Snøhetta-Designed Transformation, © Michael Grimm
© Michael Grimm

With yesterday’s grand opening ceremony in the books, Times Square’s 8-year-long transformation has been pronounced officially complete.

Led by Snøhetta, the project saw the United States’ most visited destination change from a congested, horn-honking vehicular area into a world-class public plaza with the addition of over 100,000 square feet of pedestrian-exclusive space.

© NYC DOT / Michael Grimm © NYC DOT / Michael Grimm © NYC DOT / Michael Grimm © NYC DOT / Michael Grimm +29

Snøhetta Unveils Plans for World's First Ship Tunnel in Norway

12:15 - 28 March, 2017
Snøhetta Unveils Plans for World's First Ship Tunnel in Norway, Examinations of the bedrock in Kjødepollen shows that there is more sediment than first expected. That means that the portal must be built on a larger area than previously planned. For practical and safety reasons, the entrance is proposed built as terraces. The terrace surfaces can be established by known principles for withdrawal of loads, with a combination of construction methods such as wire-cutting and blasting.. Image © Norwegian Coastal Administration/Snøhetta
Examinations of the bedrock in Kjødepollen shows that there is more sediment than first expected. That means that the portal must be built on a larger area than previously planned. For practical and safety reasons, the entrance is proposed built as terraces. The terrace surfaces can be established by known principles for withdrawal of loads, with a combination of construction methods such as wire-cutting and blasting.. Image © Norwegian Coastal Administration/Snøhetta

The Norwegian Coastal Administration has revealed visualizations of the world’s first full-scale ship tunnel that would link two fjords on either side of the Stad Peninsula in Norway, allowing ships to bypass the “most exposed, most dangerous” waters on the Norwegian coast. With the project now in the feasibility stage, architecture studio Snøhetta has produced a series of rendered design concepts to help the project gain traction within the Norwegian government.

Above the tunnel entrance at the Moldefjorden side, it is proposed to establish a new overhead bridge. The fly bridge cross the portal will also be available to the public. From the sidewalk the public can watch the ships entering and coming out of the ship tunnel.. Image © Norwegian Coastal Administration/Snøhetta Moldefjorden: Bridge, with access for the public. Image © Norwegian Coastal Administration/Snøhetta Given the scope, a multi-functional facilitation is an important part of the planning. There is a need for a longitudinal guiding structure through the tunnel and on both sides of the tunnel. These will protect the vessel against impact, but can also be used as escape routes during evacuation, and access road for inspection and maintenance of the facility.. Image © Norwegian Coastal Administration/Snøhetta The illustration shows a cross section of the ship tunnel as planned with the relevant measurements.. Image © Norwegian Coastal Administration/Appex +8

Cornell Tech Unveils Snøhetta-Designed Hotel and Education Center for Its Roosevelt Island Campus

14:00 - 14 March, 2017
Cornell Tech Unveils Snøhetta-Designed Hotel and Education Center for Its Roosevelt Island Campus, Courtesy of Snøhetta via Cornell Tech
Courtesy of Snøhetta via Cornell Tech

Cornell Tech has revealed that Snøhetta will be the latest firm to design buildings for its currently under-construction Roosevelt Island Campus, joining structures by top architects including Morphosis, Weiss/Manfredi, Handel Architects, and Skidmore Owings & Merrill. The two new buildings, the Verizon Executive Education Center and Graduate Hotel, will be the final part of phase one of the campus master plan, slated for completion in 2019.

Courtesy of Snøhetta via Cornell Tech Courtesy of Snøhetta via Cornell Tech Courtesy of Snøhetta via Cornell Tech Courtesy of Snøhetta via Cornell Tech +5

Snøhetta Wins Competition for Ice-Inspired Hotel on Helsinki's Waterfront

12:00 - 2 February, 2017
Snøhetta Wins Competition for Ice-Inspired Hotel on Helsinki's Waterfront, © Snøhetta
© Snøhetta

Snøhetta has been selected as the winners of an invited competition for the design of a new hotel to be located on the Hakaniemi waterfront in Helsinki, Finland. Aimed at becoming a “new beacon of Helsinki,” Hilbert’s Hotel will provide new public space for the city while increasing accommodation for visitors.

Snøhetta Designs World’s Northernmost Energy Positive Building in Norway

12:10 - 18 January, 2017

A country known for economic dependency on its rich oil deposits, Norway is now looking toward the future of energy production: net-positive architecture. Taking the lead in this initiative, developer Emil Eriksrød has commissioned American-Norwegian firm Snøhetta to design Norway’s first energy positive building, Powerhouse Telemark, a 6,500 square meter (70,000 square foot) office building located in the tiny Norwegian town of Porsgrunn, home to just 35,000 people. When completed, it will be the world’s northernmost plus-energy building.

Snøhetta Designs World’s Northernmost Energy Positive Building in Norway © Loft Visual Group/Snøhetta © Loft Visual Group/Snøhetta © Loft Visual Group/Snøhetta +11

Fairy Tales and Architecture: Places Journal Explores the Narrative of the Fantastical

08:00 - 24 December, 2016
Fairy Tales and Architecture: Places Journal Explores the Narrative of the Fantastical, Courtesy of Places Journal
Courtesy of Places Journal

Narrative has a powerful place in architecture, and some of the most enduring narratives come in the form of fairy tales. A recent series by Places Journal brings the two directly together, exploring “the intimate relationship between the domestic structures of fairy tales and the imaginative realm of architecture.” The curation team reflects this duality, with the diverse collection put together by writer Kate Bernheimer and architect Andrew Bernheimer. Read on for a quick look at four new additions to the series released by Places Journal this week.

Snøhetta-Designed Norwegian Banknotes to Go into Circulation in 2017

14:00 - 21 December, 2016
Back of the 100-krone note. Image Courtesy of Snøhetta
Back of the 100-krone note. Image Courtesy of Snøhetta

In 2014, Snøhetta was announced as one of two winners in a competition to design new banknotes for the Norwegian Bank. Now, after 2 years of development, the first bills have been produced and are nearly ready to begin full circulation.

To coincide with the occasion, Norges Bank has released a series of videos explaining the design and production process. Check them out below.

Utopia Arkitekter Proposes a Green Growth-Ring in Gothenburg

06:00 - 13 December, 2016
Utopia Arkitekter Proposes a Green Growth-Ring in Gothenburg , Courtesy of Utopia Arkitekter
Courtesy of Utopia Arkitekter

As Gothenburg, Sweden's urban fabric begins to change, Utopia Arkitekter have swooped in with a proposed urban plan for the development of Hovås II, located in the south of the city. Their firm's proposal has won the jury's acclaim over Snøhetta and Gehl Architects and they are now moving toward the project's next phase.

Courtesy of Utopia Arkitekter Courtesy of Utopia Arkitekter Courtesy of Utopia Arkitekter Courtesy of Utopia Arkitekter +9

The Next Great Public Spaces Will Be Indoors. Are Architects Prepared?

09:30 - 10 November, 2016
The Next Great Public Spaces Will Be Indoors. Are Architects Prepared?, Oslo Opera House by Snøhetta. Image © Snøhetta
Oslo Opera House by Snøhetta. Image © Snøhetta

This article by Kjetil Trædal Thorsen, the cofounder of Snøhetta, was originally published by Metropolis Magazine as "Opinion: The Next Great Public Spaces Will Be Indoors."

Maybe with the sole exception of railway stations, public space is generally understood as outdoor space. Whether in the United States or in Europe, especially now with heightened concerns around security, there seems to be this determined way of privatizing everything that is indoors, even as we are increasingly aiming to improve access to public space outdoors. But in the layered systems of our cities of the future, we will need to focus on the public spaces that are found inside buildings—and make them accessible.

Snøhetta Named WSJ's 2016 Architectural Innovator of the Year

12:50 - 3 November, 2016

The Wall Street Journal has named Snøhetta their “Architecture Innovator of the Year” for 2016. Founded by 55-year-old American Craig Dykers and 58-year-old Norwegian Kjetil Trædal, Snøhetta rose to prominence with their competition-winning designs for the 20th-century successor to the lost wonder of the ancient world, the Library of Alexandria, and the National Norwegian Opera House in Oslo.

Snøhetta Selected to Master Plan New Campus for the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry

11:10 - 14 October, 2016
Snøhetta Selected to Master Plan New Campus for the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry, Courtesy of Snøhetta
Courtesy of Snøhetta

The Oregon Museum of Science and Industry (OMSI) announced today that it has selected Snøhetta to lead in the master planning of their new 16-acre riverfront campus and develop a long-term vision for the future of the Portland, Oregon site.

The overall goal of the master plan will be “to provide a market-driven strategy that outlines the best economic and environmental uses of OMSI’s physical property while highlighting the museum’s work as a cultural touchstone, science education resource, and trailhead to connect the community to learning and skill-building opportunities that equip them for 21st century jobs.”

The Strange Habits of Top Architects

07:00 - 10 October, 2016

Well-known architects are easy to admire or dismiss from afar, but up close, oddly humanizing habits often come to light. However, while we all have our quirks, most people's humanizing habits don't give an insight into how they became one of the most notable figures in their field of work. The following habits of several top architects reveal parts of their creative process, how they relax, or simply parts of their identity. Some are inspiring and some are surprising, but all give a small insight into the mental qualities that are required to be reach the peak of the architectural profession—from an exceptional work drive to an embrace of eccentricity (and a few more interesting qualities besides).

Studio Gang, Shigeru Ban Among 5 Shortlisted for Arkansas Arts Center Expansion

11:55 - 4 October, 2016
Studio Gang, Shigeru Ban Among 5 Shortlisted for Arkansas Arts Center Expansion, Courtesy of Arkansas Arts Center
Courtesy of Arkansas Arts Center

The Arkansas Arts Center has selected five top architecture firms to compete for the design of a $55 million to $65 million museum expansion project in Little Rock, Arkansas. The project will include a renovation to existing theater and studio spaces, as well as new education facilities for families and gallery space to house the museum’s expanding art collection.

An advisory panel and selection committee named the finalists following a RFQ process featuring 23 local and international firms.

The 5 firms selected as finalists are:

Lost in the Landscape: Snøhetta's Wild Reindeer Center Pavilion, Filmed in 4K

04:00 - 30 September, 2016

The Dovrefjell mountain range, which divides the north and south of Norway, holds "a unique place in [the] Norwegian consciousness." A constellation of myths and legends are connected to these mountains which have, over recent years, born witness to hunting, mining and military activity. But it is also the home of a large wild reindeer population. At Hjerkinn, on the edge of the Dovrefjell National Park, Oslo-based Snøhetta have created an observation pavilion for the Wild Reindeer Foundation. In this film by Alejandro Villanueva, the building and the surrounding landscape are revealed through time-lapse and in astonishing detail.

Schmidt Hammer Lassen Wins Competition for Mixed-Use Tower and Urban Plan in Stavanger, Norway

14:20 - 20 September, 2016
Schmidt Hammer Lassen Wins Competition for Mixed-Use Tower and Urban Plan in Stavanger, Norway, © Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects
© Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects

Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects has won an international competition for the design of an urban redevelopment plan and high-rise in Stavanger, Norway. Beating out entries from Snøhetta, UNStudio, Dark Arkitekter and Eder Biesel Arkitekter, the winning proposal, “Breiavatnet Lanterna,” features a dynamic scheme to support the proliferation of sustainable and creative work environments throughout the city.

The project encompasses a new public center, the transformation of an existing park and a new 101 meter (331 foot) tall tower that will contain 18,170 square meters (195,580 square feet) of highly-flexible space for offices, restaurants, conferences and exhibitions. Both the ground and top floors of the high-rise will be publicly accessible, ensuring the building will remain an asset for the entire community.

© Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects © Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects © Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects © Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects +14