AD Classics: Esherick House / Louis Kahn

© Ludvík Koutný

An architect celebrated for his breathtaking studies of light and materiality in the creation of memorable architecture, Louis Kahn did not fail to maintain his rigor in the Esherick House of , .

Admired for it’s spatial and luminous qualities, this is the first residence of its kind to convey the grand ideas of Kahn-style architecture. The two story dwelling, which is one of only nine private houses designed by Kahn to come into realization, rests on a lively six acre garden.

More information on the Esherick House after the break.

Potts Point Apartment / Anthony Gill Architects

© Peter Bennetts

Architects: Anthony Gill Architects
Location: Sydney,
Project Team: Anthony Gill and Sarah Mcspadden
Project Year: 2010
Project Area: 38 sqm
Photographs: Peter Bennetts

Shang XIA / Kengo Kuma & Associates

Courtesy of

Architects: Kengo Kuma & Associates
Location: No. SL1-01, F1, South , Hongkong Plaza, 283 Huaihai Middle Road, Shanghai, PRC
Project name: SHANG XIA
Client: Shang xia
Design Period: 2009.08-2009.12
Construction Period: 2010.03-2010.06
Principal use: Retail
Total floor area: 126 sqm
Stories: 1 story
Photographs: Courtesy of Kengo Kuma & Associates

Update: Navy Pier design teams present to the public

Existing Image of the Navy Pier © Stephen Hanafin via flickr - http://www.flickr.com/photos/shanafin/

Starting tomorrow, the five design teams selected to redesign the outdoor spaces of Chicago’s Navy Pier will begin to reveal their schemes to the public. Lead by AECOM, Aedas Architects, James Corner Field Operations, !melk and the Xavier Vendrell Studio, each team will be given thirty minutes to present their ideas, followed by a ten minute question and answer session. The presentations will take place on January 31st and February 1st at the Museum of Contemporary Art. Continue reading for the presentation schedules and more information on the competition.

Rosa Gardens / Brooks & Scarpa

© John Edward Linden

Architects: Brooks & Scarpa
Location: Palm Springs, , USA
Client: Coachella Valley Housing Coalition
Project Team: Lawrence Scarpa, FAIA – Lead Designer
Angela Brooks, , Omar Barcena, Mark Buckland, Brad Buter, Silke Clemens, Emily Hodgdon, Ching Luk, Gwynne Pugh, Sri Sumantri – Project Design Team
Project Year: 2011
Project area: 93,000 sqf
Photographs: John Edward Linden

Social Housing In Paris / Dietmar Feichtinger Architectes

©

Architects: Dietmar Feichtinger Architectes
Location: Paris,
Client: BNP Paribas Immobilier Résidentiel IDF
Project Team: Justyna Swat, Marcus Himmel, Katja Pargger, Florian Vadjoux, Anna Zottl, Mathias Neveling, Arne Speiser, Hugo Enlart
Project Year: 2011
Project Area: 7,360 sqm
Photographs: Dietmar Feichtinger Architectes

AD Recommends: Best of the Week

© Shu He

Projects from China, , The Netherlands and Czech Republic, as well as our special inforgraphic on the Serpentine Gallery Pavillion’s 11 years. Check the best of last week after the break.

Administration Building of the North Gas Company in Jiading / Atelier Deshaus
This is the administration building of the North Shanghai Gas Company in Jiading. The needs of the function of this building are generally simple. With surrounding the undeveloped constructional land, the site is small, and the only feature of the site is the river landscape close to the northern side. The final form of the building completely responds to the landscape in the northern side (read more…)

Yarralumia Poolhouse / Katon Redgen Mathieson

© Katon Redgen Mathieson

Architects: Katon Redgen Mathieson
Location: ACT,
Project Year: 2011
Photographs: Katon Redgen Mathieson

Baroque Court Apartments / OFIS arhitekti

Courtesy of

Architects: OFIS arhitekti
Location: Ljubljana,
Project Team: Rok Oman, Spela Videcnik, Andrej Gregoric, Janez Martincic, Janja Del Linz, Laura Carroll, Erin Durno, Leonor Coutinho, Maria Trnovska, Jolien Maes, Sergio Silva Santos, Grzegorz Ostrowski, Javier Carrera, Magdalena Lacka, Estefania Lopez Tornay, Nika Zufic
Structural Engineering: Elea IC d.o.o.
Mechanical Engineering: ISP d.o.o.
Electrical Engineering: Eurolux d.o.o.
Client: DZS d.d
Site Area: 692 sqm
Gross Floor Area: 2,420 sqm
Photographs: Tomaz Gregoric, Jan Celeda

2011 Skyscraper Trends

© TFP Farrells

Every January the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat conducts a review of skyscraper construction and compiles all the data from the previous year. The trend since 2007 has seen record breaking years for buildings taller than 200 meters completed, with 88 skyscrapers completed in 2011. Even as the global economy is slowly recuperating from the 2008 financial crisis, it would appear as though this trend will remain relatively stable. China, leading the pack at 23 completed towers is predicted to remain at the forefront of skyscraper market, followed by Middle Eastern countries in the next decade.  UAE, South Korea, and Panama City – an up and coming cosmopolitan city – rounded out the top four. Of the towers completed in 2011, 17 have made their way into the top 100 tallest buildings – Shenzhen’s Kingkey 100, at 442 meters crowning this year’s list. More after the break.

Uptown Kids / Elliott + Associates Architects

Scott McDonald © Hedrich Blessing

Architects: Elliott + Associates Architects
Location: , Oklahoma,
Project Team: Rand Elliott, FAIA, David Poerio, Assoc. AIA
Client: Gary and Carolyn Goldman
Civil Engineer: Johnson & Associates, Inc.
Structural Engineer: Engineering Solutions, Inc.
Consultants: Smith Lighting (lighting); Logo designed by: Rachel Shingleton; Smith & Pickel Construction, Inc.(General Contractor)
Project Year: 2010
Project Area: 2,573 sqf
Photographs: Scott McDonald © Hedrich Blessing

AIA’s 2012 Legislative Agenda

© 2010 CAST architecture

The AIA recently unveiled their 2012 legislative agenda, and has made it clear that creating jobs in the design and construction industry are a priority. We have been covering the numerous initiatives that the has been implementing over the past year ranging from the Stalled Building Index, the regularly updated Architectural Billing Index and their update of the 2030 Commitment Reporting Tool. Of particular importance, especially for those of us who are running small firms or contemplating breaking into this fragile market as a sole proprietor, is an emphasis on fostering our growth. With the bulk of firms falling into this category – 95% of all firms in the US employ 50 or fewer people – this initiative should put some pressure on the political machine that has the authority to reign in the tax rates on small entrepreneurs and stimulate growth through the reevaluation of private sector lending.  In tandem with this concerted effort by the AIA, it is practically imperative as a owner, that we take control and become much more fluid in an increasingly amorphous and uncertain environment. Whether it is by seeking out non-traditional design opportunities, or introducing new initiatives that are unique to your firm, we as a design community are certainly up to the task. (See Jennifer Kennedy’s recent article on the topic here.)

To see more of the AIA’s 2012 Legislative Agenda topics visit them here.

Practice 2.0: Championing the young architect’s career, a lesson from technology startups

ICON's 20 Young Architects, photo via anarchitecture

By David Fano and Steve Sanderson, edited by Julie Quon

A well-known and often cited truism of architecture notes that forty (as in years) is considered young for an architect and most don’t start hitting their stride until they’re seventy. This may partially explain why well-known architects seem to live forever… they’re simply too busy to die. What is often omitted from this narrative is how the architects spent the first twenty (or so) years of their careers as freshly minted graduates prior to being recognized by their peers in the profession as “making it”.

If you approach any architect about their early-career experience in the profession you will get slightly different versions of the same story. They are all, in essence, about paying your dues.

  1. Taking a low-paying position for an A or B-list architect, where the compensation for long hours is the privilege of anonymous design on important projects, and in return a few hours are spent outside of the studio (usually with a group of similarly indebted classmates) on open design competitions that pay trifle stipends.
  2. Taking a low-paying adjunct teaching position, ideally in a design studio, where compensation for long hours is the privilege of working on your design interests with students in order to become a part of the elite tastemakers and to one day be shortlisted for an exclusive cultural .
  3. Taking a slightly better paying position with a corporate firm and spending your hours outside of work designing kitchens and bathrooms for wealthy friends and family with hopes that their social reach is broad enough to lead to additional commissions that will one day be substantial enough to make a living.
  4. Taking a slightly better paying position with a corporate firm and slogging through the incredibly tedious intern development and professional registration process in order to move up the corporate hierarchy. The goal is to eventually become a principal or partner with an established firm or even break off on your own with some of the established firm’s clients.

In each of these scenarios, the only path to a significant commission is to spend the few hours outside of these paying jobs in the pursuit of establishing credibility and reputation through exposure in architectural publications. In any case, it seems that around the age of forty is when all of this hard work finally begins to pay off with consistent commissions. For the vast majority that never succeed by following these models, there is usually a ‘pivot’ (in startup terms, a change in approach) that leads to a stable corporate position, a full-time teaching post, or an exit from the profession altogether (we did the latter, see Fed’s post). The difficulty of ‘being’ an architect is branded about in schools (oftentimes by people with little to no actual experience in the field) as a source of pride, a perverse hazing ritual intended to weed out all but the most dedicated adherents to the ideals of architecture as a pure form of expression, a rationale which further reinforces architecture as an intellectual pursuit for the privileged (that topic is for another post).

Courtesy of LAVA

Classroom of the Future / LAVA

Designed as a learning space for the future, LAVA…‘s design focuses on an environment that is sustainable, integrates with the landscape, connects with the school environment, and is suitable for prefabrication and mass customization.  Relocatables are the decades old

Renovation And Extension Of The German School In Lisbon / JLCG Arquitectos

© FG+SG – Fernando Guerra, Sergio Guerra

Architects: JLCG Arquitectos / João Luís Carrilho da Graça
Location: Lisbon,
Project Team: Francisco Freire, Paulo Costa, Joanna Malitski, Vera Schmidberger, Paula Miranda, Marcos Roque, Raquel Morais, Luis Cordeiro, Vanessa Pimenta, architect; Nuno Pinto, drawing
Project Year: 2010
Project Area: New construction: 4,500 sqm; Existing intervention: 7,500 sqm; Outer spaces: 30,200 sqm
Photographs: FG+SG – Fernando Guerra, Sergio Guerra

Sumatrakontor Hamburg / Erick van Egeraat, Michiel Raaphorst

Courtesy of Erick van Egeraat

Architect: Erick van Egeraat, Michiel Raaphorst
Location: ,
Project Area: 9,681 sqm
Project Year: 2011
Photographs: Courtesy of Erick van Egeraat

Video: New Museum / SANAA / Great Spaces


Ever likened SANAA’s to Lady Gaga?  We didn’t think so!  So, check out this video by Great Spaces and prepare to see the museum in a new light.   Toward the end of the video, it was mentioned that only after won the Pritzker, did some people truly take notice of the museum.  Have you visited the New Museum on the Bowery prior to the Pritzker, or have you been influenced to see if after ’s won?   And, for more info on the museum, be sure to reference our previous articles.

Courtesy of Carnegie Mellon School of Architecture

Carnegie Mellon Spring 2012 Lecture Series

Known for drawing in a diverse background of well-known architects, Carnegie Mellon School of Architecture‘s spring 2012 lecture series began January 23rd with Jesse Seppi and concludes with Tatiana Bilbao on April 23rd. All events will take place at the…