Sao Cirilo Community Center / Nuno Valentim Arquitectura

© João Ferrand & Mariana Themudo

Architects: Nuno Valentim Arquitectura - Nuno Valentim, Frederico Eça
Location: Rua Barão de Forrester, Porto,
Collaborators: Paola Monzio, Joana Sarmento, Margarida Ramos
Completion: 2008
Area: 2215 sqm
Photographs: João Ferrand, Mariana Themudo 

   

Hafen / Murphy/Jahn

Courtesy of

Architects: Murphy/Jahn 
Location: Düsseldorf,
Completion: 2010
Height: 70M
Area: 14,625sqm
Photographs: Courtesy of Murphy/Jahn

   

AIA 2012 National Convention and Design Exposition

Via

One week from today, ArchDaily will be joining you at the AIA 2012 National Convention! Knowledge, inspiration and connection are the three primary reasons architects are attending this year’s convention. In just three days (May 17-19), you can fulfill your annual Learning Units with nearly 200 education sessions, gain insight on the latest products and technologies at the Design Expo, and expand your professional network with the opportunity of meeting thousands of architects from around the country. Also, with AIA DC as your host, you will have the opportunity to explore the highlights of our nation’s capitol with a number of exclusive tours.

Continue after the break to learn more!

Arganzuela Footbridge / Dominique Perrault Architecture

© Georges Fessy / DPA / Adagp

Architects: Dominique Perrault Architecture
Location: Parque de la Arganzuela, ,
Engineering: MC2 – Julio Martínez Calzón (stucture) /  TYPSA (mechanical engineering)
Built area: Footbridge 150 m (section 1) 128 m (section 2) length, 5 to 12 m width
Completion: 2010
Photographs: Georges Fessy, Ayuntamiento de Madrid 

Ideas and Observations on Architectural Competitions

Courtesy of , Anna Rosinke

Although competitions are fraught with their own issues, our profession is indelibly linked to them. Competitions have been pushing the profession forward for centuries, encouraging innovation, creativity and inspiring many. They have given emerging professionals their “big break” (think Maya Lin) and have showered the world with many important, game-changing masterpieces (Rolex Learning Center, Pompidou Center, Brunelleschi’s dome, the Acropolis…). As expected, the end result of a competition typically dominates the conversation; however, it is interesting to discuss process of competition making.

SOLID architecture is a firm that relies heavily on competitions, as they have received most of their commissions by winning a competition. They have shared with us their top ten ideas and observations on the process of competition making in hopes that it will spark a dialogue on the topic. As you can see above, the first on their list is “change the medium”. Continue reading after the break to review the complete list and join the conversation.

Pitfalls of Observational Studies

Clever Hans and the observer effect

After showing two groups of schoolteachers a videotape of an eight-year-old boy, psychologists John Santrock and Russel Tracy found that the teachers’ judgment of the child ultimately depended on whether they had been told the child came from a divorced home or an intact home.  The child was rated as less well-adjusted if the teachers thought he came from a home where the parents were divorced.[1] This finding might seem inconsequential to the field of architecture, but for a profession that often relies on observational studies to evaluate a design’s effect on its users I argue that Santrock and Tracy’s study is one among many architects need to pay attention to.

An observational study*, like post-occupancy surveys, is a common method architects use to evaluate a design’s effect on its users. If done well observational studies can provide a wealth of valuable and reliable information. They do, however, have their pitfalls, most notably controlling for cognitive and selection biases. At the risk of limiting readership, I will illustrate these challenges by reviewing a specific observational study dealing with design. Although specific, the following example wrestles with the same difficulties that other observational studies in architecture wrestle with.

‘Reverse of Volume RG’ Installation / Onishi Yasuaki

© Nash Baker

Yasuaki Onishi, who is known for his art throughout Japan and internationally, currently has an installation on exhibit in the Rice Gallery in titled, ‘Reverse of Volume RG’. On display until June 24, he uses plastic sheeting and black hot glue to create a monumental, mountainous form that appears to float in space. In using these simple materials, he is able to successfully meditate on the nature of the negative space, or void, left behind. More images and project description after the break.

Can you Crowdsource a City?

A screenshot of the Video for the City 2.0, the 2012 TED Prize Winner, which aims to use to rebuild our cities. Photo via Atlantic Cities.
Pop-Up,” “DIY,” “Kickstarter” “LQC” (That’s lighter, quicker, cheaper for the unfamiliar). Urbanisms of the People have been getting awfully catch-phrasey these days. What all these types of DIY Urbanisms share is a can-do spirit, a “Hacker” mentality: people are taking back their cities, without any “expert” help.

Unfortunately, of course, this mindset creates an anti-establishment (often, anti-architect) antagonism that would render any wide-spread change nigh impossible. Yes, the DIY movement, facilitated by the use of technology, is excellent for getting people involved, for encouraging important, innovative ideas – in the short-term.

As Alexandra Lange recently pointed out in her post “Against Kickstarter Urbanism,” technology is not a “magic wand,” and crowdsourcing initiatives often fall short in the day-to-day, nitty-gritty work of a large-scale, long-term urban project.

But while technology certainly has its limitations, its potential to facilitate connection and communication is unparalleled. What is vital, however, is that the technology enhance, not replace, our physical relationships. Instead of using online platforms as divisive or purely conceptual forums, they must becomes tools of transparency and trust-building, mediators of a conversation that invests and connects all parties on the ground.

Nishi Sales Suite and Gallery / hungerford+edmunds + OCULUS

© Nic Bailey

Architects: hungerford+edmunds + OCULUS 
Location: New Acton , Australian Capital Territory, Australia
Client: Molonglo Group
Collaborators: Molonglo Group (client), PBS (builder), (landscape), Arup (ESD), Design Office (interior fit-out) and Clear (graphic design)
Completion: 2011
Area: 270 sqm
Photographs: Nic Bailey

Memphis Veterinary Specialists / archimania

© Jeffrey Jacobs Photography

Architect: Archimania
Location: Cordova, Tennessee,
Owner/Client: Tobias and Associates, LLC
Building Area: 18,323 square feet
Construction Cost: $3,219,900
Completion: June 2011
Photographs: Jeffrey Jacobs Photography

  

Tsinghua Law Library Building Proposal / Kokaistudios

Courtesy of

Kokaistudios was recently announced as the winner of the competition for the new Tsinghua University Law Library located in , China. Proposing a reflection on the role of void in structuring functions and programs within the building, their design also defines, at the same time, its relations within its surroundings. More images and architects’ description after the break.

Practice of Periodontics Zwolle / Kwint Architecten

© Marco C. Slot Photography

Architects: Kwint Architecten
Location: ,
Completion Year: 2011
Collaborators: Heldoorn B.V., Building Contractor; Breman Kloekke, Electrician; Zwols Loodgieters Bedrijf Plumber; Alferink-Van Schieveen, Strucural Engineer; Dental Union
Area: 592 sqm
Photographs: Marco C. Slot Photography

© Philip Winkelmeyer

‘Follow Me: Berlin’s Airport’ Conference

Hosted by Topos Magazine, the ‘Follow Me: Berlin’s Airport’ Conference will be taking place in the disused buildings of Tempelhof Airport on June 5. A number of prominent European Architects, Urban Designers & Landscape Architects will be giving lectures /…

Lagoon Beach House / Birrelli Architects

© Rob Burnett

Architects: Birrelli Architects
Location: Tasmania,
Project Team: Ed Gordon, Lynden Jones, Phil Dingemanse, Andrew Geeves, Jack Birrell
Built Area: 255 sqm
Completion: 2011
Photographs: Rob Burnett

Image Credit: Shutterstock

Sunglass: Bringing Architectural Drafting into the Modern Age

Sunglass, built by two TED fellows, Nitin Rao and Kaustuv DeBiswas, is a collection of three products: the company’s Sunglass Player, which allows artists to incorporate the objects that they’ve created with the software into other web services like Behance.…

AD Classics: Holy Cross Church in Chur, Switzerland / Walter Förderer

Photo by Sebastian F - http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File%3AKKH -2.JPG

Standing at the foot of the Alps is the highly contemporary Holy Cross Church in Chur, . Designed by Basel born Swiss architect Walter Förderer, the church evokes strong features of Brutalism. Built between 1966 to 1969, the church appears like a mass fortress that conveys a symbolic defensive attitude.

IES Mont Perdut in Terrassa / Lluis Comeron i Graupera

© Pedro Pegenaute

Architects: Lluís Comerón i Graupera
Location: Mont Perdut St, , Spain
Construction Management: Jaume Prat Boma, SL, Structural, Joan Antoni González Gou, Mechanical, Ivana Rosell, Acoustics
Promoter: Gisa
Completion: 2011
Budget: 6,070,305,68 €, PEC
Area: 4,472.97 sqm
Photographs: Pedro Pegenaute

TED Talk: A Giant Bubble for Debate / Liz Diller

Liz Diller, founding principle of Diller, Scofidio + Renfro, shares the story of creating the pneumatic addition to the Hirshhorn Museum in Washington, DC. Commonly known as the “Bubble”, the inflatable event space is planned for the cylindrical courtyard of the National Mall’s modernist museum that was originally designed by Gordon Bunshaft in 1974. The first inflation of the “Bubble” is expected to take place at the end of 2013.

“To truly make good public space, you have to erase the distinctions between architecture, urbanism, landscape, [and] media design.” –