AD Round Up: The Architecture Photography of Fernando Guerra

Ílhavo Maritime Museum Extension / ARX . Image Courtesy of FG+SG –

Today, we’d like to commemorate the captivating of Fernando Guerra. The Portuguese architect-turned-photographer’s work has graced our webpages many times since he began his career in 2001. In a recent interview with Paperhouses, he recalls the evolution of his aspiration to capture decisive architectural moments. Here are five of our favorites: Cube HouseAlcácer do Sal Residences, House in Fontinha, the Pocinho Center for High Performance Rowing, and the Ílhavo Maritime Museum Extension.

Rem Koolhaas’ Current Fascinations: On Identity, Asia, the Biennale, & More

Courtesy of Strelka Institute for Media, Architecture, and Design, via Flickr

In this interview, originally published in The Architectural Review, Andrew Mackenzie sits down with OMA founder Rem Koolhaas to discuss the Venice Biennale, the extinction of national identities, his fascination with Asia, the link between De Rotterdam and Delirious New York, and the future of the profession.

Your proposition for this year’s Venice Architecture Biennale asks whether national identity has been, as you say, ‘sacrificed to modernity’. Some might view this as a project of reclamation, not unlike Frampton’s regionalism. How would you differentiate your proposition from Frampton’s?

Well, Kenneth Frampton is a smart guy, but the problem is that he looked at regionalism as an antidote to cosmopolitan development. In so doing he perverted the cause of regionalism, because suddenly regionalism was mobilised as a private cause that it couldn’t sustain. However, the question of national identity is an open one. For instance, at first sight the Netherlands is a very internationalist country, but looking closely you can see an enormous return of, not vernacular, but quasi-vernacular architecture and quasi-old fortresses that are newly built with a national flavour. Look at Zaandam, and that huge assemblage of so-called vernacular buildings.

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Eight Ingenious Interiors

In case you missed it, we’re re-publishing this popular post for your material pleasure. Enjoy!

Continuing with our materials-themed posts celebrating the launch of AD Materials (our US product catalog), we decided to round-up eight materials/products (from a light fixture made from woven irrigation hoses – really – to a wall made from shoeboxes) that make their truly ingenious. Enjoy!

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Kickstart the Latest Edition of ‘City of Darkness’: The Authoritative Text on Kowloon Walled City

20 years ago, Greg Girard and Ian Lambot published “City of Darkness“, a book which documented life inside the notorious Kowloon Walled City in Hong Kong during its peak in the late 1980s. When the high-rise slum was cleared and demolished soon after in 1993, this collection of photographs, interviews and essays became a eulogy of sorts, becoming one of the key texts on the most densely populated place the world has ever seen.

Two decades later, Girard and Lambot have revisited the book – and to fund this new edition, they have turned to Kickstarter.

Read on after the break to find out what’s new in this edition and how you can help fund the book.

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On Designing Evil Lairs

The Elrod House by John Lautner, the murderer’s lair in Diamonds are Forever, 1971. Image Courtesy of Expoint Realty

This article, by , originally appeared on as “Evil Lairs.”

New plan.

From now on I will ONLY design evil lairs. Because all the best architecture is designed for the evil.

My work will have moats, and concrete, and glass and steel. I will design 16-story one-bedroom homes, with helipads, and lots of electronics. There will be a retractable roof, maybe lasers.

I will completely ignore the building code, because you know “evil”. Building codes are for the common people. Not for the evil.

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Unpublished / CLOG

Courtesy of

Each edition of CLOG poses a particular challenge to the reader: by showcasing such a variety of distinct view points, teasing out the central, connective themes is far from an easy task. It requires analysis, thought, and most of all time – which is, of course, entirely the point. CLOG seeks to “slow things down” so that the greater issues of architectural discourse are mulled over and explored.

The latest CLOG, however, Unpublished, has two central points that quickly, easily emerge. Pick up CLOG: Unpublished if you want to learn two things: (1) about how and why certain publications choose the architecture they publish (ArchDaily included); or (2) about works that have, for their geographical location or problematic nature, been forgotten from the “idealized narratives” of architecture

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Architectural Review’s Latest Issue: “Is This The End of Public Space?”

Courtesy of

ArchDaily is happy to announce a new development in our partnership with The Architectural Review. Each month, AR’s editor, Catherine Slessor, will weigh in with a thematic introduction to the subjects addressed in their current issue. Up now: public space. Is it on the brink of extinction? And, if so, how can we reclaim it?

Just over 20 years ago, Mike Davis and Michael Sorkin predicted the end of public space as we knew it. ‘America’s cities are being rapidly transformed by a sinister and homogeneous design’, they wrote at the time. ‘A new kind of urbanism – manipulative, dispersed, and hostile to traditional public space – is emerging both at the heart and at the edge of town in megamalls, corporate enclaves, gentrified zones, and pseudo-historic marketplaces.It marked the beginning of the realisation that public space was being stealthily privatised and commodified; the historic freedoms of the agora and the piazza replaced by the patrolled and proscribed confine of the theme park and shopping mall.

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Heatherwick to Transform Cape Town’s Grain Silo into Contemporary Art Museum

Interior. Image Courtesy of Heatherwick Studio

Imagine forty-two, 33 meter high concrete tubes each with a diameter of 5.5 meters, with no open space to experience the volume from within. The brief from the Zeitz Museum of Contemporary Art Africa (Zeitz MOCAA) for London-based Heatherwick Studio was to “reimagine the Grain Silo Complex at Cape Town’s V&A Waterfront with an architectural intervention inspired by its own historic character,” calling for a “solution unique for Africa” in order to create “the highest possible quality of space for the work displayed inside.” Heatherwick’s response will be the creation of a “a new kind of museum in an African context.”

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In Honor of Pi Day, A Round-Up of Round Architecture

Happy Pi Day everyone! To celebrate the circle and its influence on architecture, we’ve decided to round up some rounded structures. First up, Roll It, a cool experimental house/cylinder. Second, Villa Vals, the hobbit-like neighbor of Zumthor‘s Therme Vals (designed underground to maintain the bath houses’ extensive views). Then, the stacked, rounded form of the Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts, designed by Moshe Safdie for optimal sound reflection. Next up, Galaxy Soho, designed by the queen of curvature, Zaha Hadid. And – last but not least – the “mothership” itself, Foster + Partners‘ design for Apple’s new campus, scheduled for completion in 2016.

London’s Impending Tall Building Boom

Central as it will look when all current projects are completed.. Image Courtesy of CPAT / Hayes Davidson / Jason Hawkes

In a study of all development plans in London, the think tank New London Architecture has found that at least 236 buildings over 20 stories are currently either under construction, approved or awaiting approval in the capital – with over 80% of these projects yet to break ground.

The study, created to support an by NLA called “London’s Growing… Up!,” found that 80% of the new towers will be residential, and that the areas of greatest activity were in Central and Eastern areas of London, with 77% of these tall buildings in the City of London or the Boroughs of Tower Hamlets, Lambeth, Greenwich, Newham and Southwark.

Read on for more results of, and reactions to, the study…

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5 Ways Koolhaas’ Biennale Will Be Different From the Rest

Paolo Baratta and . © Giorgio Zucchiatti. Image Courtesy of la Biennale di Venezia

As Rem Koolhaas completes the introductory press circuit for the 2014 Venice Biennale, we’re learning more about one of the most anticipated Biennales in recent memory. Here’s what we’ve gleaned from Oliver Wainwright’s revealing story in today’s Guardian:

1. Koolhaas has been asked to direct the before, but hasn’t accepted until now. “I have been asked to direct it a number of times before, but I held out for two conditions: that I have a year and a half to plan it, and that I can sever all connections with contemporary architecture – which is not in particularly good health.”

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AD Classics: Peabody Terrace / Sert, Jackson & Gourley

© Jannis Werner

Built in 1964 during his tenure as Dean at the Graduate School of Design, Josep Lluís ’s Peabody Terrace provides housing for almost 1500 graduate students and their families.  One of several projects Sert designed for ’s campus, it is a manifestation of his vision for the ideal neighborhood. Many elements such as the negotiation of scale, mixed use program, shared open space and design aesthetic were influenced by but represent a departure from earlier modern housing projects.

Peabody Terrace is a prototypical example of a twentieth-century project heralded by the architectural community as an exemplar of progressive modern ideals, but lambasted by neighbors and members of the general public for being unattractive, cold and imposing. This project and others like it highlight the disconnect that can occur between the architectural intelligentsia and the communities in which they build.

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Venice Biennale 2014: Nordic Pavilion to Study Architecture’s Role in East African Independence

FORMS OF FREEDOM. Kenyatta International Conference Center, Nairobi, Kenya. 1966–1973. Architect: Karl Henrik Nøstvik.. Image © David Keith Jones

The National Museum in has been chosen to curate the Nordic Pavilion for the 2014 Venice Architecture Biennale, in collaboration with the Museum of Finnish Architecture, the Swedish Centre for Architecture and Design in Stockholm, and architectural firm Space Group. The , “FORMS OF FREEDOM: African Independence and Nordic Models” will study modern Nordic architecture’s role in the liberation of East Africa during the 1960s and 70s.

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Latest Details Released on Koolhaas’ Venice Biennale 2014 “Fundamentals”

Elements of Architecture Stair – Models at the Friedrich Mielke Institute of Scalology. © . Image Courtesy of la Biennale di Venezia

UPDATE: In a press conference on Monday, Venice Biennale director Paolo Baratta and curator Rem Koolhaas expressed their commitment to using the event to highlight “things that architects can’t ignore.” These “Fundamentals” get back to the basic inventions of modernity, thus individual exhibitions will look to the “elementary particles of architecture.” Paying special attention to the developments of the past century, Baratta and Koolhaas hope that the event will serve as “a reference point and source of inspiration for architecture.”

The Biennale website has posted new images and an expanded description of the Biennale and its events:

Fundamentals consists of three interlocking exhibitions – Absorbing Modernity 1914-2014Elements of Architectureand Monditalia – that together illuminate the past, present and future of our discipline. After several architecture Biennales dedicated to the celebration of the contemporary, Fundamentals will look at histories, attempt to reconstruct how architecture finds itself in its current situation, and speculate on its future.”

Read on to learn more about architecture’s most celebrated .

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INFOGRAPHIC: Materials in Architecture (A History)

In case you missed it, we’re re-publishing this popular post for your material pleasure. Enjoy!

To celebrate AD Materials turning two three (months that is), we decided to dig a bit deeper into the we know and love. What’s their history? When did they first come to use – and where? How? If you want to know more about the lives – past and present – of concrete, glass, steel, and more, check out our fantastic new infographic after the break!

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The Indicator: Where the Migrant Workers Are

Architects’ design for al-Wakrah stadium, the main stadium for the 2022 World Cup. Image Courtesy of ZHA

Zaha Hadid’s unfortunate comments in response to worker deaths on construction sites for the 2022 World Cup has made Qatar the eye of a storm that has been raging globally for decades. But it’s not just about Qatar. This has been an issue for as long as there have been construction sites and for as long as poor people have swarmed to them for a chance at a better life.

Construction booms and migrant construction workers have always been two sides of the same equation, both dependent on the other, and, by the twisted logic of the global economy, both are the reason for the other’s existence. No migrant labor pool = no global city = no fantastic architecture, or something to this effect.

The migrant workers are the silent collaborators in global architecture, the invisible, faceless, “untouchables” who make the cost-effective construction of these buildings possible.

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Smiljan Radic to Design 2014 Serpentine Pavilion

© 2014 Smiljan Radic Studio

Joining the ranks of Sou Fujimoto (2013), Herzog & de Meuron and Ai Weiwei (2012),Peter Zumthor (2011),Jean Nouvel (2010),SANAA (2009),and more, little-known Chilean architect Smiljan Radic will be the fourteenth architect to design London’s . Renderings of his design reveal a semi-translucent, cylindrical structure that rests on large quarry stones.The pavilion, to open June 26th, will remain in Kensington Gardens for four months.

Although Radic has constructed little outside his home country, his work has gained attention due to its versatility and attention to context. If you’re unfamiliar, we recommend checking out Mestizo Restaurant, which similarly incorporates stone into its design, as well as his most recent. Julia Peyton-Jones, Director, and Hans Ulrich Obrist, Co-Director, of the Serpentine Galleries explained their choice: “We have been intrigued by [Radic’s] work ever since our first encounter with him at the Venice Architecture Biennale 2011 [sic]. Radic is a key protagonist of an amazing architectural explosion in Chile. While enigmatically archaic, in the tradition of romantic follies, Radic’s designs for the Pavilion also look excitingly futuristic, appearing like an alien space pod that has come to rest on a Neolithic site. We cannot wait to see his Pavilion installed on the ’s lawn this summer.”

More info and images after the break…

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The 20 Most Visited ArchDaily Projects of All Time

To celebrate our birthday today, we decided to take a look back at the most popular projects of the last six years. Who takes the top spot? ? Frank Gehry? Well, you may be surprised…

See our 20 most popular projects of all time, after the break…

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