1. ArchDaily
  2. Future Architecture

Future Architecture: The Latest Architecture and News

Modern Aquatic Architecture: 5 Homes Around the World that Make the Case for Living on Water

Following findings from a study published in the Nature Ecology & Evolution journal this April, it has become public knowledge that the phenomenon dubbed the Great Pacific Garbage Patch (an area of 620,000 square miles between California and Hawaii) is serving as host to an entire coastal ecosystem. Marine wildlife is using the massive area compiled of human plastic waste as a floating habitat, and scientists are shocked at the number of species that have managed to establish life in this otherwise hostile environment.

The news once again brings into sharp focus not only pressing issues of climate change and ocean pollution but also the question of environmentally-induced migration, even at a microbial level. Architecture is moving into more and more experimental realms when it comes to considering locations for the communities of our future – and rising sea levels have promoted water to the top of the list. But these deliberations are not as recent as one might think: floating cities have been around for centuries and individual homes on water are common in areas of Benin, Peru or Iraq, among others.

Modern Aquatic Architecture: 5 Homes Around the World that Make the Case for Living on Water - Imagen 1 de 4Modern Aquatic Architecture: 5 Homes Around the World that Make the Case for Living on Water - Imagen 2 de 4Modern Aquatic Architecture: 5 Homes Around the World that Make the Case for Living on Water - Imagen 3 de 4Modern Aquatic Architecture: 5 Homes Around the World that Make the Case for Living on Water - Imagen 4 de 4Modern Aquatic Architecture: 5 Homes Around the World that Make the Case for Living on Water - More Images+ 7

Disruptive Materials and Finishes for Future Home Interiors

How are contemporary homes pushing the boundaries of innovation for the future? Currently, these spaces tend towards clean lines, neutral colors and flexible spaces, with the integration of technological features and automation. But even though there are certain timeless features that define neutral contemporary interiors, we can begin to identify future trends by analyzing architectural projects that differ from the traditional, recognizing disruptive interior materials and finishes guided by technological advances that are shaping complex and changing homes of the future. The selection of these innovative materials conveys a meticulous decision process in building the structure and identity of a space. Depending on the context and typology of a space, there is a growing awareness of how materials impact an environment, and how new technologies are creating smart solutions that can mitigate their effects indoors.

Artificial intelligence (AI) is playing a key role in visualizing the interiors of the homes of the future, and together with the exploration of biophilic, intelligent and 3D-printed materials, is stimulating new ways of approaching how we will live indoors moving forward.

A Living Capsule on The Moon and a Garden Home in Colombia: 10 Unbuilt Visionary Houses Submitted to ArchDaily

This week's curated selection of Best Unbuilt Architecture highlights visionary homes by the ArchDaily community. From a prefabricated house to supporting Ukraine war victims, a modular multi-story house highlighted during the Dutch Design Week, and a villa "shaped" by the Dubai coastline wind flow, this round-up of unbuilt projects showcases how architects move forward from the conventional residence concept to project alternative habitational standards in responding to harsh environments, nature, and technology.

Featuring firms like architecten van Mourik, Archigardener, DKTV, Exint, Kalbod Design Studio, Lana Alk habbaz studio, Mitchell Designs Architecture, Mossawi Studios LLC, Void, and Team Group, the following list explores homes at different scales and varying stages of their development. Whether competition-winning projects or ongoing planned execution, each project develop a vision of living generated by unique site conditions and technical possibilities.

A Living Capsule on The Moon and a Garden Home in Colombia: 10 Unbuilt Visionary Houses Submitted to ArchDaily - Image 1 of 4A Living Capsule on The Moon and a Garden Home in Colombia: 10 Unbuilt Visionary Houses Submitted to ArchDaily - Image 2 of 4A Living Capsule on The Moon and a Garden Home in Colombia: 10 Unbuilt Visionary Houses Submitted to ArchDaily - Image 3 of 4A Living Capsule on The Moon and a Garden Home in Colombia: 10 Unbuilt Visionary Houses Submitted to ArchDaily - Image 4 of 4A Living Capsule on The Moon and a Garden Home in Colombia: 10 Unbuilt Visionary Houses Submitted to ArchDaily - More Images+ 46

Major Lessons of Contemporary School Design: 37 Learning Spaces from Around the World

The role of a school is to prepare children for life. But with life-changing faster than ever, schools need to change just as quickly. Recent additions to school curriculums reflect the complexities of modern life, with environmental crises, societal injustices, and the dangers of social media now major parts of the syllabus.

Although it’s often said that long-term change begins at ground-level, change is never easy, wherever it starts. For example, a curriculum that responds to environmental issues is said to cause growing instances of eco-anxiety in children, one of a number of causes of another crisis, in children’s mental health.

Major Lessons of Contemporary School Design: 37 Learning Spaces from Around the World - Image 1 of 4Major Lessons of Contemporary School Design: 37 Learning Spaces from Around the World - Image 2 of 4Major Lessons of Contemporary School Design: 37 Learning Spaces from Around the World - Image 3 of 4Major Lessons of Contemporary School Design: 37 Learning Spaces from Around the World - Image 4 of 4Major Lessons of Contemporary School Design: 37 Learning Spaces from Around the World - More Images+ 33

"New Practices" in Architecture are Just an Evolution

“We shape our buildings; thereafter they shape us.” Despite Winston Churchill’s words, architects are shaped by our culture, and our work reacts to it. Because our culture evolves, the practice of architecture evolves. What is “New” in architectural practice has had accelerating change, exploding in the 21st century because new technologies have changed everything on a level of the Industrial Revolution, 200 years ago.  

Will the Past Dictate the Aesthetics of the Future?

The current architectural production faces several paradigms and one of them is aesthetic. In a scenario of constant uncertainty, buildings with projections, holograms, or completely automatic ones that science fiction has shown so much, seem more and more distant from reality. Nowadays, the search for greater identification with the built space has been amplified instead of idealizing the new for the new. Therefore, looking at the past has presented different perspectives and it is in this scope that perhaps we can imagine a new futuristic aesthetic.

Why Every 3D Designer / Architect Can Benefit From the Creator Economy in the Metaverse

Nike recently acquired RTFKT, a design studio that was founded in Jan 2020, and is known for its virtual “metaverse-ready sneakers and collectibles”. Metaverse land purchases are making headlines with multi-million dollar price tags. We’ve also seen mainstream adoption for NFT art this year and the sales are expected to surge to $17.7 billion by the end of 2021.

Beneath the hype and frenzy, we can spot a fundamental shift that unlocks a new creator economy. It provides the creators with direct access to the market, builds ongoing relationships with fans, and unites strangers in self-governed communities. In this article, we will discuss why every 3D designer/architect should embrace the Web 3.0 movement to adopt a new business logic and benefit from the creator economy in the metaverse?

Why Every 3D Designer / Architect Can Benefit From the Creator Economy in the Metaverse - Image 1 of 4Why Every 3D Designer / Architect Can Benefit From the Creator Economy in the Metaverse - Image 2 of 4Why Every 3D Designer / Architect Can Benefit From the Creator Economy in the Metaverse - Image 3 of 4Why Every 3D Designer / Architect Can Benefit From the Creator Economy in the Metaverse - Image 4 of 4Why Every 3D Designer / Architect Can Benefit From the Creator Economy in the Metaverse - More Images+ 5

A 2021 Moment In Architecture That May Define The Future

Some years end up being cultural pivot points. 2021 was one such year, with COVID-19 as the first existential threat to our culture since World War II. Architecture will change as a result, and may evolve in public perception to value motivations as a criteria for understanding it, versus valuing outcomes as the validation of any particular aesthetic.

A 2021 Moment In Architecture That May Define The Future - Image 1 of 4A 2021 Moment In Architecture That May Define The Future - Image 2 of 4A 2021 Moment In Architecture That May Define The Future - Image 3 of 4A 2021 Moment In Architecture That May Define The Future - Image 4 of 4A 2021 Moment In Architecture That May Define The Future - More Images+ 1

Architecting the Metaverse

You might have heard that Mark Zuckerberg wants Facebook to become a Metaverse Company, and earlier this year, Epic Games, the company that develops the Unreal Engine announced that it completed a 1 billion round of funding to support the long-term vision for the metaverse. Metaverse is definitely the hottest buzzword in the tech scene. In this article, we will briefly discuss what is Metaverse, who will build it, and most importantly why it matters for architects, and how can designers play a significant role in this upcoming digital economy?

Architecting the Metaverse - Image 1 of 4Architecting the Metaverse - Image 2 of 4Architecting the Metaverse - Image 3 of 4Architecting the Metaverse - Image 4 of 4Architecting the Metaverse - More Images+ 5

How Social Sciences Shape the Built Environment

Within an increasingly specialized environment, architecture is becoming a collective endeavour at every stage of the design process, and social sciences have acquired an important role. As architecture has become more aware of its social outcome, decisions formerly resulted from the speculative thinking of the architect are now backed up by professional expertise. The following discusses the increasing role of humanist professions such as anthropology, psychology, or futurology within architecture.

How Social Sciences Shape the Built Environment - Image 1 of 4How Social Sciences Shape the Built Environment - Image 2 of 4How Social Sciences Shape the Built Environment - Image 3 of 4How Social Sciences Shape the Built Environment - Image 4 of 4How Social Sciences Shape the Built Environment - More Images+ 2

An Optimist’s Take on AI and the Future of Architecture

This article was originally published on Common Edge.

Martin C. Pedersen discusses with Frank Stasiowski, the founder and president of PSMJ Resources, his take on AI and the future of the profession. The author explains that six years ago he "interviewed Frank Stasiowski, the founder and president of PSMJ Resources, a management consulting firm that specializes in architecture, engineering, and construction firms. In addition to advising firms on strategic and growth planning, leadership and succession plans, mergers and acquisitions, and a host of other issues, Stasiowski spends a lot of his time analyzing where the industry is likely to evolve in the future, especially as technology takes an increasingly important role". Finding him one of the keenest observers of the industry, Pedersen talked to Stasiowski to get his opinion on AI and the future of the architectural profession.

Spacemaker Proposes AI-Powered Generative Design to Create More Sustainable Spaces and Cities

Autodesk has just acquired Spacemaker, a platform that “gives architects and developers the automation superpower to test design concepts in minutes” and explore the best urban design options. Targeting architects, urban designers, and real estate developers, the cloud-based AI-powered generative design helps professionals taking better early-stage design decisions.

Spacemaker Proposes AI-Powered Generative Design to Create More Sustainable Spaces and Cities - Image 1 of 4Spacemaker Proposes AI-Powered Generative Design to Create More Sustainable Spaces and Cities - Image 2 of 4Spacemaker Proposes AI-Powered Generative Design to Create More Sustainable Spaces and Cities - Image 3 of 4Spacemaker Proposes AI-Powered Generative Design to Create More Sustainable Spaces and Cities - Image 4 of 4Spacemaker Proposes AI-Powered Generative Design to Create More Sustainable Spaces and Cities - More Images+ 8

10 ArchDaily Interviews Reflecting on the Future of Architecture

In order to inspire our audience, generate critical debates, and develop ideas, ArchDaily has been continuously questioning architects about the future of architecture. To define emerging trends that will shape the upcoming cities, examining “What will be the future of architecture?” became an essential inquiry. More relevant during these ever-changing moments, discover 10 interviews from ArchDaily’s archived YouTube playlists that will highlight diverse visions from 10 different pioneers of the architecture field.