the world's most visited architecture website
All
Projects
Products
Events
Competitions
  1. ArchDaily
  2. Exposition

Exposition: The Latest Architecture and News

AD Classics: World's Columbian Exposition / Daniel Burnham and Frederick Law Olmsted

16:30 - 9 October, 2018
AD Classics: World's Columbian Exposition / Daniel Burnham and Frederick Law Olmsted, Viewed from the far end of the Great Basin, the Administration Building looms over the court of honor and the surrounding great buildings of the fair. ImageCourtesy of Wikimedia user RillkeBot (Public Domain)
Viewed from the far end of the Great Basin, the Administration Building looms over the court of honor and the surrounding great buildings of the fair. ImageCourtesy of Wikimedia user RillkeBot (Public Domain)

The United States had made an admirable showing for itself at the very first World’s Fair, the Crystal Palace Exhibition, held in the United Kingdom in 1851. British newspapers were unreserved in their praise, declaring America’s displayed inventions to be more ingenious and useful than any others at the Fair; the Liverpool Times asserted “no longer to be ridiculed, much less despised.” Unlike various European governments, which spent lavishly on their national displays in the exhibitions that followed, the US Congress was hesitant to contribute funds, forcing exhibitors to rely on individuals for support. Interest in international exhibitions fell during the nation’s bloody Civil War; things recovered quickly enough in the wake of the conflict, however, that the country could host the Philadelphia Centennial Exhibition in 1876. Celebrating both American patriotism and technological progress, the Centennial Exhibition was a resounding success which set the stage for another great American fair: the World’s Columbian Exposition of 1893.[1]

Courtesy of Wikimedia user RillkeBot (Public Domain) Although the building itself was handsome, the exhibits of the United States Government Building failed to entice many of the fair’s visitors. In the foreground stands the Ho-O-Den, a replica medieval Japanese palace. ImageCourtesy of Wikimedia user RillkeBot (Public Domain) Courtesy of Wikimedia user scewing (Public Domain A map of the 1893 Exposition shows how much of the fair’s buildings were laid out on axis with the court of honor. ImageCourtesy of Wikimedia user scewing (Public Domain) + 16

Exhibition - Serralves Collection: 1960-1980 / COR Arquitectos

03:00 - 27 May, 2017
Exhibition - Serralves Collection: 1960-1980 / COR Arquitectos, © atelier XYZ
© atelier XYZ
  • Arquitetos

  • Location

    Museu Serralves, R. Dom João de Castro 210, 4150-417 Porto, Portugal
  • Category

  • Team

    Roberto Cremascoli , Edison Okumura, Marta Rodrigues
  • Area

    880.0 m2
  • Project Year

    2017
  • Photographs

© atelier XYZ © atelier XYZ © atelier XYZ © atelier XYZ + 49

What can Latin America Learn From WOHA's Green Skyscrapers?

16:00 - 22 April, 2017

WOHA's first exhibition in Latin America, Garden City Mega City: WOHA's Urban Ecosystems presents over two decades of WOHA's international designs. With its inauguration at the Museum of the City of Mexico during the MEXTRÓPOLI International Festival of Architecture and City, the exhibition proposes the introduction of biodiversity and lively public spaces into vertical, climate-sensitive highrises within megalopolises.

The exhibition features sixteen intricate architectural models, an immersive video installation and large-scale drawings and images that show WOHA's proposals for vertical communities in the tropical megacities. PLANE-SITE documented the exhibition's opening along with the points of view of various MEXTRÓPOLI contributors and city officials.

Concrete and Glass: Lina Bo Bardi's Easels and a New, Old Way of Displaying Art

06:00 - 29 December, 2015
Concrete and Glass: Lina Bo Bardi's Easels and a New, Old Way of Displaying Art, © Romullo Baratto
© Romullo Baratto

Forty-seven years after their first appearance, Lina Bo Bardi's iconic glass easels have returned to the gallery at São Paulo's Museum of Art (MASP), displaying some of the museum's most valuable paintings, spanning from the medieval to the modern, in an exhibition on the second floor of the museum.

Removed from display in 1996, the concrete pillars, wood and glass easels were reviewed by METRO Arquitetos, who became part of MASP's curatorial team -- in charge of exhibition design -- last December. Having carried out various exhibitions this year at the museum - such as Brazilian Art Through the 1900s - METRO Arquitetos decided to end the year by bringing back the easels, in an exhibition similar to the original one conceived by Lina, which almost five decades later, continues to impress with its innovative way of exhibiting art in museums.

We had the opportunity to visit the exhibition montage and speak with architect Martin Corullon about the return of the easels and the process of recovering the space as conceived by Lina for the museum. Read the complete interview below.

© Romullo Baratto © Romullo Baratto © Romullo Baratto © Romullo Baratto + 24

Lina Bo Bardi’s Archive on Display at her Glass House in São Paulo

15:00 - 16 May, 2015
Lina Bo Bardi’s Archive on Display at her Glass House in São Paulo, © Marina Correia
© Marina Correia

Text description provided by the architects. The design of the Lina em Casa: Percursos (Lina at Home: Journeys) exhibition was developed with the intention of preserving the spatial experience and the unique atmosphere of Casa de Vidro (Glass House). Understanding the House as the principle legacy of the architect on display and a major object of interest for visitors, the organization of the exhibition stands avoids creating spatial subdivisions that could detract from the building’s architecture.