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Timothy Hursley

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15 Projects of Steel Stealing the Show

07:30 - 24 May, 2019
15 Projects of Steel Stealing the Show , © Iwan Baan
© Iwan Baan

The use of steel in architecture is considered as one of the most innovative construction developments in history, allowing architects to create structures in scales they never thought they could. Fast-forward a few centuries, and steel remains as one of the most crucial materials in architecture. But there is a lot more to the material than just tensile strength and durability, some architects were well-aware of steel's potential and transformed it into lighting fixtures, facades, decorative elements, and finishes.

Here are 15 projects where architects looked beyond steel as structural support and explored its diverse possibilities in architecture.

© Ket Kolektif © Markus Hattwig © Juan Alberto Andrade © Edmon Leong + 16

Haus Gables / MALL

06:00 - 7 May, 2019
Haus Gables / MALL, © NAARO
© NAARO

© NAARO © NAARO © NAARO © NAARO + 32

Why It’s Convenient To Wrap Architecture In Zinc

05:30 - 15 April, 2019
Why It’s Convenient To Wrap Architecture In Zinc, The Alchemist / Reid Architects. Manufactured by elZinc. Image Cortesía de elZinc
The Alchemist / Reid Architects. Manufactured by elZinc. Image Cortesía de elZinc

A lightweight material par excellence, Zinc is a non-ferrous metal that provides an effective solution for coating buildings exposed to adverse weather condition while simultaneously delivering a creative response to the requirements of the program and the users of the project.

When in contact with humidity, Zinc panels generate a self-protecting layer that isolates heat from indoor spaces during the summer. Rain and snow, slide easily over its surfaces, and its modular panels can wrap curved shapes or be perforated according to the architectural design, and combined in facades and/or ceilings through different shades, brightness, and colors.

Legacy ER Allen / 5G Studio Collaborative. Manufactured by MetalTech-USA. Image © Michael Moran/OTTO The House on the Cliff / GilBartolome Architects. Manufactured by elZinc. Image © Jesús Granada The Alchemist / Reid Architects. Manufactured by elZinc. Image Cortesía de elZinc Stade De Soccer de Montréal / Saucier + Perrotte architectes + Hughes Condon Marler Architects. Manufactured by elZinc. Image © Olivier Blouin + 19

The Evans Tree House at Garvan Woodland Gardens / modus studio

17:00 - 3 April, 2019
The Evans Tree House at Garvan Woodland Gardens / modus studio, © Timothy Hursley
© Timothy Hursley

© Timothy Hursley © Timothy Hursley © Timothy Hursley © Timothy Hursley + 31

  • Architects

  • Location

    Hot Springs, Arkansas, United States
  • Category

  • Lead Architects

    Chris Baribeau, Josh Siebert, Suzana Annable, Jody Verser, Philip Rusk, Scott Penman, Jason Wright, Paul Siebenthal, Alex Cogbill, Reice Brummett, Kevin Brown
  • Area

    591.0 m2
  • Project Year

    2018
  • Photographs

Arata Isozaki's Palladium Nighclub Through the Lens of Timothy Hursley

10:30 - 7 March, 2019
Arata Isozaki's Palladium Nighclub Through the Lens of Timothy Hursley, © Timothy Hursley
© Timothy Hursley

In May 1985, an old theater and concert hall opened its doors to the public for the opening of a brand new nightclub in New York City. Located on 126 East 14th Street, the project was commissioned by entrepreneurs Steve Rubell and Ian Schrager, owners of the also famous club Studio 54, and was conceived as a vibrant and luminous independent structure arranged inside a rather classic shell, which appears as a beautiful backdrop behind the clean geometry of Isozaki.

As The New York Times pointed out in its May 20, 1985 edition: 'Arata Isozaki is at once a great eminence of Japanese architecture and a source of some of its freshest thinking. And all sides of Mr. Isozaki are visible in the Palladium'.

© Timothy Hursley © Timothy Hursley © Timothy Hursley © Timothy Hursley + 14

Who is Arata Isozaki? 20 Things to Know About the 2019 Pritzker Laureate

10:00 - 5 March, 2019
Who is Arata Isozaki? 20 Things to Know About the 2019 Pritzker Laureate, © PLANE SITE
© PLANE SITE

The prolific and varied career of 2019 Pritzker Laureate Arata Isozaki, which includes more than 100 works built on virtually every continent, gives us a huge amount of facts that are relevant to understanding his life and architecture. Considered the first Japanese architect to develop his work on a truly global scale, Isozaki took special care to respond to the context and the specific requirements of each project, expanding the heterogeneity of his work and resulting in a variety of styles from vernacular to high tech.

See below 20 fascinating facts that illuminate his particular genius:

University of Arkansas, University Housing / Polk Stanley Wilcox Architects

15:00 - 25 January, 2019
University of Arkansas, University Housing / Polk Stanley Wilcox Architects, © Timothy Hursley
© Timothy Hursley

© Timothy Hursley © Timothy Hursley © Timothy Hursley © Timothy Hursley + 12

Zinc-Coated Buildings: 20 Recyclable and Durable Facades

04:00 - 23 January, 2019
Zinc-Coated Buildings: 20 Recyclable and Durable Facades, Perry and Marty Granoff Center for the Creative Arts, Brown University / Diller Scofidio + Renfro. Image © Iwan Baan
Perry and Marty Granoff Center for the Creative Arts, Brown University / Diller Scofidio + Renfro. Image © Iwan Baan

Zinc is a natural element extracted from ores. Its symbol, which appears in the dreaded Periodic Table, is Zn. Through a metallurgical process of burning its impurities (reducing zinc oxide and refining), it assumes a much more friendly appearance, and later becomes the sheets, coils, and rollers used in construction. The main characteristic of this material is its malleability, which allows it to be worked easily, allowing to cover complex forms in facades and roofs of buildings.

27 Projects Win 2019 AIANY Design Awards

10:00 - 19 January, 2019
27 Projects Win 2019 AIANY Design Awards, Tata Consultancy Services, Banyan Park. Image © Michael Moran
Tata Consultancy Services, Banyan Park. Image © Michael Moran

The New York Chapter of the American Institute of Architects has presented 27 projects with 2019 Design Awards. AIANY announced the results after two days of deliberations by a a jury of independent architects, educators, critics, and planners. For each of the five categories, winning projects were granted either an “Honor” or “Merit” award, and were chosen for their design quality, innovation and technique.

Princeton University Embodied Computation Laboratory. Image © Pablo Marvel Tanderrum Bridge. Image © Kristoffer Paulson Oculi House. Image © Michael Moran Cornell Tech Tata Innovation Center. Image © Albert Vecerka + 28

Moshe Safdie Awarded 2019 Wolf Prize

11:00 - 18 January, 2019
Moshe Safdie Awarded 2019 Wolf Prize, Habitat 67 / Moshe Safdie. Image © Timothy Hursley
Habitat 67 / Moshe Safdie. Image © Timothy Hursley

Moshe Safdie has been named the laureate for the 2019 Wolf Prize for Architecture. The award recognizes a winner in either painting, music, sculpture, or architecture. As one of Israel’s most prestigious international awards, the prize is bestowed upon luminaries for their accomplishments in advancing science and art for the benefit of humanity. The jury cited Safdie’s exemplary career motivated by the social concerns of architecture and his formal experimentation.

Kansas State University - College of Architecture, Planning and Design / Ennead Architects + BNIM

12:00 - 23 October, 2018
Kansas State University - College of Architecture, Planning and Design / Ennead Architects + BNIM, © Timothy Hursley
© Timothy Hursley

© Timothy Hursley © Timothy Hursley © Timothy Hursley © Timothy Hursley + 17

Heart of the Park Buildings at Shelby Farms Park / Marlon Blackwell Architect + James Corner Field Operations

14:00 - 5 October, 2018
Heart of the Park Buildings at Shelby Farms Park / Marlon Blackwell Architect + James Corner Field Operations, © Timothy Hursley
© Timothy Hursley

© Timothy Hursley © Timothy Hursley © Timothy Hursley © Timothy Hursley + 42

18 Fantastic Permeable Facades

12:00 - 23 September, 2018
© Hiroyuki Oki
© Hiroyuki Oki

© Nguyen Thai Thach © Koji Fuji / Nacasa & Partners Inc © Pedro Nuno Pacheco © Gonzalo Viramonte + 20

Recently, a new trend in architecture has emerged: Several of the latest projects highlighted by ArchDaily, including some winners in the Building of the Year Awards, are using permeable facades as an attractive option for their exterior finishes.

Better lighting, ventilation, and visibility are some of the advantages brought by this type of façades. Below is a selection of 15 images from prominent photographers such as Andrés Valbuena, Pedro Nuno Pacheco, and Koji Fuji Nacasa & Partners Inc.

Arkansas Bear Claw / modus studio

18:00 - 12 August, 2018
Arkansas Bear Claw / modus studio, © Timothy Hursley
© Timothy Hursley

© Timothy Hursley Courtesy of modus studio Courtesy of modus studio © Timothy Hursley + 21

  • Architects

  • Location

    Fayetteville, Arkansas, United States
  • Category

  • Lead Architects

    Chris Baribeau, AIA (principal architect); Aaron Speaks, AIA (project manager); David McElyea; Graham Patterson, Assoc. AIA; Suzana Annable, AIA; Leanne Baribeau, AIA; Philip Rusk, Assoc. AIA; Cory Amos, AIA; Michael Pope, AIA
  • Area

    325233.0 m2
  • Project Year

    2017
  • Photographs

Dogwoodtrot House / modus studio

09:00 - 10 August, 2018
Dogwoodtrot House / modus studio, © Aaron Kimberlin
© Aaron Kimberlin

© Timothy Hursley © Timothy Hursley © Timothy Hursley © Timothy Hursley + 18

  • Architects

  • Location

    United States
  • Category

  • Lead Architects

    Chris Baribeau, AIA (principal architect); Suzana Annable, AIA (project manager); Michael Pope, AIA; Philip Rusk, Assoc. AIA
  • Area

    5834.0 ft2
  • Project Year

    2016
  • Photographs

Diffused Light: How to Design 'Lantern Buildings' With Self-Supporting Glass Walls

05:30 - 10 August, 2018
Diffused Light: How to Design 'Lantern Buildings' With Self-Supporting Glass Walls, The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art / Steven Holl Architects. Image © Andy Ryan
The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art / Steven Holl Architects. Image © Andy Ryan

Recurrently we see how architects opt for translucent facades to create the envelopes of their buildings, promoting the entry of a large amount of natural light, while simultaneously controlling it during the day. Illuminated during the night, many of these projects can be seen in the dark, appearing as lanterns or lighthouses for their neighbors and community. Being exposed to changing conditions – day or night – to choose the right material, it's necessary to study in detail the orientation and location of the building, the pre-existing context, and the configuration of the interior spaces.

We present a system of glass panels that allow buildings with this type of façade –spanning from floor to ceiling without interruptions – with minimal frames and different colors, textures, thermal and acoustic performances. 

The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art / Steven Holl Architects. Image © Andy Ryan C-Glass House / Deegan Day Design. Image © Taiyo Watanabe Magnolia Mound Visitors Center / Trahan Architects. Image © Timothy Hursley Nelson Atkins Museum of Art / Steven Holl. Image Cortesía de Bendheim + 28

Will Architecture in the Future Be a Luxury Service?

09:30 - 2 August, 2018
Will Architecture in the Future Be a Luxury Service?, Oculus / Santiago Calatrava. Image © Photo by gdtography from Pexels
Oculus / Santiago Calatrava. Image © Photo by gdtography from Pexels

This article was originally published by Common Edge as "In the Era of Artificial Intelligence, Will Architecture Become Artisanal?"

Like food and clothing, buildings are essential. Every building, even the most rudimentary, needs a design to be constructed. Architecture is as central to building as farming is to food, and in this era of rapidly advancing technological change farming may offer us valuable lessons.

At last census count there were 233,000 architects in the United States; the 113,000 who are currently licensed represent a 3% increase from last year. In addition there’s a record number of designers who qualify for licensure: more than 5,000 this year, almost the same number as graduates with professional degrees. There is now 1-architect-for-every-2,900 people in the US. A bumper crop, right?

These Alabama Architecture Students are Designing and Building Low-Cost Homes for Rural America

06:00 - 18 July, 2018
© Timothy Hursley
© Timothy Hursley

Rural Studio, a student-centered design/build program at Auburn University’s College of Architecture, Design and Construction, has announced a collaboration with the mortgage loan company Fannie Mae to support the school’s 20K Initiative. This initiative continues to contribute to the development of "beautiful, healthy and resilient houses that afford financially vulnerable homeowners the ability to live in dignity, security and well within their means."

As a means to address the shortage of affordable housing in the U.S., the research produced from this collaboration with Fannie Mae is being shared with educational institutions industry groups. Auburn University is also providing funding for the initiative through a grant to "further strengthen the collaboration with Fannie Mae, as well as support the development of additional stakeholder collaborations."

© Timothy Hursley © Timothy Hursley © Timothy Hursley Courtesy of Auburn University Rural Studio + 7