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Timothy Hursley

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Kansas State University - College of Architecture, Planning and Design / Ennead Architects + BNIM

12:00 - 23 October, 2018
Kansas State University - College of Architecture, Planning and Design / Ennead Architects + BNIM, © Timothy Hursley
© Timothy Hursley

© Timothy Hursley © Timothy Hursley © Timothy Hursley © Timothy Hursley + 17

Heart of the Park Buildings at Shelby Farms Park / Marlon Blackwell Architect + James Corner Field Operations

14:00 - 5 October, 2018
Heart of the Park Buildings at Shelby Farms Park / Marlon Blackwell Architect + James Corner Field Operations, © Timothy Hursley
© Timothy Hursley

© Timothy Hursley © Timothy Hursley © Timothy Hursley © Timothy Hursley + 42

18 Fantastic Permeable Facades

12:00 - 23 September, 2018
© Hiroyuki Oki
© Hiroyuki Oki

© Nguyen Thai Thach © Koji Fuji / Nacasa & Partners Inc © Pedro Nuno Pacheco © Gonzalo Viramonte + 20

Recently, a new trend in architecture has emerged: Several of the latest projects highlighted by ArchDaily, including some winners in the Building of the Year Awards, are using permeable facades as an attractive option for their exterior finishes.

Better lighting, ventilation, and visibility are some of the advantages brought by this type of façades. Below is a selection of 15 images from prominent photographers such as Andrés Valbuena, Pedro Nuno Pacheco, and Koji Fuji Nacasa & Partners Inc.

Arkansas Bear Claw / modus studio

18:00 - 12 August, 2018
Arkansas Bear Claw / modus studio, © Timothy Hursley
© Timothy Hursley

© Timothy Hursley Courtesy of modus studio Courtesy of modus studio © Timothy Hursley + 21

  • Architects

  • Location

    Fayetteville, Arkansas, United States
  • Lead Architects

    Chris Baribeau, AIA (principal architect); Aaron Speaks, AIA (project manager); David McElyea; Graham Patterson, Assoc. AIA; Suzana Annable, AIA; Leanne Baribeau, AIA; Philip Rusk, Assoc. AIA; Cory Amos, AIA; Michael Pope, AIA
  • Area

    325233.0 m2
  • Project Year

    2017
  • Photographs

Dogwoodtrot House / modus studio

09:00 - 10 August, 2018
Dogwoodtrot House / modus studio, © Aaron Kimberlin
© Aaron Kimberlin

© Timothy Hursley © Timothy Hursley © Timothy Hursley © Timothy Hursley + 18

  • Architects

  • Location

    United States
  • Lead Architects

    Chris Baribeau, AIA (principal architect); Suzana Annable, AIA (project manager); Michael Pope, AIA; Philip Rusk, Assoc. AIA
  • Area

    5834.0 ft2
  • Project Year

    2016
  • Photographs

Diffused Light: How to Design 'Lantern Buildings' With Self-Supporting Glass Walls

05:30 - 10 August, 2018
Diffused Light: How to Design 'Lantern Buildings' With Self-Supporting Glass Walls, The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art / Steven Holl Architects. Image © Andy Ryan
The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art / Steven Holl Architects. Image © Andy Ryan

Recurrently we see how architects opt for translucent facades to create the envelopes of their buildings, promoting the entry of a large amount of natural light, while simultaneously controlling it during the day. Illuminated during the night, many of these projects can be seen in the dark, appearing as lanterns or lighthouses for their neighbors and community. Being exposed to changing conditions – day or night – to choose the right material, it's necessary to study in detail the orientation and location of the building, the pre-existing context, and the configuration of the interior spaces.

We present a system of glass panels that allow buildings with this type of façade –spanning from floor to ceiling without interruptions – with minimal frames and different colors, textures, thermal and acoustic performances. 

The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art / Steven Holl Architects. Image © Andy Ryan C-Glass House / Deegan Day Design. Image © Taiyo Watanabe Magnolia Mound Visitors Center / Trahan Architects. Image © Timothy Hursley Nelson Atkins Museum of Art / Steven Holl. Image Cortesía de Bendheim + 28

Will Architecture in the Future Be a Luxury Service?

09:30 - 2 August, 2018
Will Architecture in the Future Be a Luxury Service?, Oculus / Santiago Calatrava. Image © Photo by gdtography from Pexels
Oculus / Santiago Calatrava. Image © Photo by gdtography from Pexels

This article was originally published by Common Edge as "In the Era of Artificial Intelligence, Will Architecture Become Artisanal?"

Like food and clothing, buildings are essential. Every building, even the most rudimentary, needs a design to be constructed. Architecture is as central to building as farming is to food, and in this era of rapidly advancing technological change farming may offer us valuable lessons.

At last census count there were 233,000 architects in the United States; the 113,000 who are currently licensed represent a 3% increase from last year. In addition there’s a record number of designers who qualify for licensure: more than 5,000 this year, almost the same number as graduates with professional degrees. There is now 1-architect-for-every-2,900 people in the US. A bumper crop, right?

These Alabama Architecture Students are Designing and Building Low-Cost Homes for Rural America

06:00 - 18 July, 2018
© Timothy Hursley
© Timothy Hursley

Rural Studio, a student-centered design/build program at Auburn University’s College of Architecture, Design and Construction, has announced a collaboration with the mortgage loan company Fannie Mae to support the school’s 20K Initiative. This initiative continues to contribute to the development of "beautiful, healthy and resilient houses that afford financially vulnerable homeowners the ability to live in dignity, security and well within their means."

As a means to address the shortage of affordable housing in the U.S., the research produced from this collaboration with Fannie Mae is being shared with educational institutions industry groups. Auburn University is also providing funding for the initiative through a grant to "further strengthen the collaboration with Fannie Mae, as well as support the development of additional stakeholder collaborations."

© Timothy Hursley © Timothy Hursley © Timothy Hursley Courtesy of Auburn University Rural Studio + 7

Crescent Park / Eskew+Dumez+Ripple

11:00 - 11 July, 2018
Crescent Park / Eskew+Dumez+Ripple, © Timothy Hursley
© Timothy Hursley

© Timothy Hursley © Timothy Hursley © Timothy Hursley © Timothy Hursley + 40

  • Architects

  • Location

    New Orleans, Louisiana, United States
  • Principal in Charge

    Mark Ripple, Allen Eskew
  • Project Manager

    Amanda Rivera
  • Architect of Record

    Eskew+Dumez+Ripple, Executive Architect
  • Landscape Architect & Design Lead

    Hargreaves Associates
  • Design Architects Piety Wharf & Bridge

    Adjaye Associates
  • Design Architects Mandeville Wharf & Bridge

    Michael Maltzan Associates
  • Project Year

    2018
  • Photographs

15 Inspiring Architecture School Buildings from Around the World

14:00 - 16 June, 2018
© Matthew Carbone
© Matthew Carbone

Architecture schools and the students they house have a particularly unique and interesting building-user relationship. Architecture students value the buildings of their school not only for providing the valuable work space necessary for constructing studio projects but also as an example and model of a building in use. As the buildings are the places where students first learn how to read and understand architecture, design schools become full-scale teaching tools that help new designers grasp structure, details, how materials perform and interact, and so many of the other core concepts of architecture. While the scrutiny of students and faculty can be exhaustive, architects have embraced the challenge of creating engaging works of architecture that both suit the specific needs of a school and take on the pedagogical challenge of educating students by example.

When it Comes to Building a Better Airport, "It Never Pays to Use Cheap Materials"

09:30 - 11 April, 2018
When it Comes to Building a Better Airport, "It Never Pays to Use Cheap Materials", Washington Dulles Internation Airport - Main Terminal Expansion. Image © Rick Latoff
Washington Dulles Internation Airport - Main Terminal Expansion. Image © Rick Latoff

Airport design is both an art and a science: the best terminals are not only functional, but also beautiful and awe-inspiring spaces. Millions of people pass through these terminals every day, yet few understand their inner workings as well as Roger Duffy and Derek A.R. Moore—design leaders at SOM who have conceptualized some of the most ambitious aviation projects around the world, including Terminal 2 at Chhatrapati Shivaji International Airport in Mumbai. In this interview, Moore, a Director, and Duffy, a Design Partner, reflect on the complicated challenges of airport design, and how these constraints can fuel creative solutions.

Changi International Airport - Terminal 3. Image © Tim Griffith Chhatrapati Shivaji International Airport – Terminal 2. Image Courtesy of SOM / Robert Polidori © Mumbai International Airport Pvt. Ltd. Toronto Pearson International Airport Terminal 1. Image © Timothy Hursley Washington Dulles Internation Airport - Automated People Mover Station. Image Courtesy of SOM / © Jeff Goldberg | Esto + 15

6 Materials That Age Beautifully

09:30 - 26 March, 2018
6 Materials That Age Beautifully, © Rory Gardiner
© Rory Gardiner

Often as architects we neglect how the buildings we design will develop once we hand them over to the elements. We spend so much time understanding how people will use the building that we may forget how it will be used and battered by the weather. It is an inevitable and uncertain process that raises the question of when is a building actually complete; when the final piece of furniture is moved in, when the final roof tile is placed or when it has spent years out in the open letting nature take its course?

Rather than detracting from the building, natural forces can add to the material’s integrity, softening its stark, characterless initial appearance. This continuation of the building process is an important one to consider in order to create a structure that will only grow in beauty over time. To help you achieve an ever-growing building, we have collated six different materials below that age with grace.

Top Young North American Firms Win The Architectural League's 2018 Emerging Voices Awards

12:40 - 1 February, 2018
Top Young North American Firms Win The Architectural League's 2018 Emerging Voices Awards, Bruma House; Estado de México, Mexico, 2017 / Fernanda Canales + Claudia Rodríguez. Photography: Rafael Gamo. Image © Fernanda Canales
Bruma House; Estado de México, Mexico, 2017 / Fernanda Canales + Claudia Rodríguez. Photography: Rafael Gamo. Image © Fernanda Canales

The Architectural League of New York has announced the recipients of its 2018 Emerging Voices awards, spotlighting individuals and firms “with distinct design voices and the potential to influence the disciplines of architecture, landscape design, and urbanism.”

Magnolia Mound Visitors Center / Trahan Architects

12:00 - 1 February, 2018
Magnolia Mound Visitors Center / Trahan Architects, © Timothy Hursley
© Timothy Hursley

© Timothy Hursley © Timothy Hursley © Timothy Hursley © Timothy Hursley + 16

  • Architects

  • Location

    2040 Iowa St, Baton Rouge, LA 70802, United States
  • Lead Architects

    Victor F. “Trey” Trahan, III, FAIA
  • Team

    Brad McWhirter, AIA, Mark Hash, Ben Rath, Michael McCune, Kim Nguyen, AIA, Sarah Cancienne
  • Area

    4000.0 ft2
  • Project Year

    2013
  • Photographs

5 Very Different Ways to Finance the Construction of Tiny Houses

09:30 - 5 January, 2018
5 Very Different Ways to Finance the Construction of Tiny Houses, This tiny house in the woods can be rented via Getaway. Image © Roderick Aichinger
This tiny house in the woods can be rented via Getaway. Image © Roderick Aichinger

This article originally appeared on Archipreneur as "5 Amazing Tiny Houses and Their Financing Models."

The tiny house movement is taking the housing market by storm, with small homes appearing all over rural and urban areas across the world. They are an affordable and eco-conscious solution to the narrowing housing supply and can offer mobility to an increasing population of young professionals. Tiny houses come in many forms and sizes—from micro-apartments and office spaces, to cabins on wheels and trailers. Similarly, the financing models vary, depending on function, local building codes, size requirements and whether they’re made as commercial products or private housing solutions.

The best option is to design and build the house yourself, using savings instead of worrying about interest rates and debt. Some tiny house manufacturers offer in-house payment solutions to their customers. Other options are RV loans, peer-to-peer lending and crowdfunding. We assembled a list of 5 beautiful tiny houses built for different purposes.

Sculpture Studio / Modus Studio + El Dorado

09:00 - 12 December, 2017
Sculpture Studio / Modus Studio + El Dorado, © Timothy Hursley
© Timothy Hursley

© Timothy Hursley © Mike Sinclair © Mike Sinclair © Mike Sinclair + 20

James Stewart Polshek Wins 2018 AIA Gold Medal

16:20 - 6 December, 2017
James Stewart Polshek Wins 2018 AIA Gold Medal, William J Clinton Presidential Center and Park (2004). Image © Timothy Hursley
William J Clinton Presidential Center and Park (2004). Image © Timothy Hursley

The American Institute of Architects (AIA) has named James Stewart Polshek, FAIA, as the recipient of the 2018 AIA Gold Medal. Lauded by the AIA for his “unparalleled vision and leadership,” Polshek has enjoyed fruitful professional and academic careers as a founding partner of James Stewart Polshek Architect (later Polshek Partnership and currently Ennead Architects) and a former dean of Columbia University’s Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation.

Honoring “an individual or pair of architects whose significant body of work has had a lasting influence on the theory and practice of architecture,” the AIA Gold Medal is often considered the highest honor awarded in the United States for architecture.

Newtown Creek Wastewater Treatment Plant. Image © Jeff Goldberg/Esto Newseum / Freedom Forum Foundation World Headquarters (2008). Image © Jeff Goldberg/Esto The Rose Center for Earth and Space at the American Museum of Natural History in New York (2000). Image © Jeff Goldberg/Esto William J Clinton Presidential Center and Park (2004). Image © Timothy Hursley + 5

The Evolution of Light in IM Pei’s Museums, from Dark Concrete Voids to Luminous Glass Pyramids

09:30 - 11 October, 2017
The Evolution of Light in IM Pei’s Museums, from Dark Concrete Voids to Luminous Glass Pyramids, Illuminated glass pyramid at Grand Louvre during twilight, Paris / France. Architecture: I. M. Pei & Partners, New York. Lighting design: Claude and Danielle Engle, Washington. Photography: Thomas Mayer. Image © ERCO GmbH, www.erco.com
Illuminated glass pyramid at Grand Louvre during twilight, Paris / France. Architecture: I. M. Pei & Partners, New York. Lighting design: Claude and Danielle Engle, Washington. Photography: Thomas Mayer. Image © ERCO GmbH, www.erco.com

Although the Louvre pyramid, often recognized as his masterwork, created a luminous icon for presenting culture, IM Pei’s early museums were characterized by the harsh shadows of brutalism. Project by project, the Chinese-American master developed a sophisticated, open architectural language. Pei’s holistic approach for welcoming museum visitors comprises powerful symbols which utilize sunlight to its fullest during the daytime, while employing the magical glow of illumination in the evening.

Whereas most assessments of the Louvre have praised the achievements of the luminous pyramid as seen above the ground, the actual design challenge laid underground, in offering visitors a successful underground space. Later, Pei transferred his language to multiple other museum projects, where light was always a key factor in defining museum experiences. In a year of celebratory events such as “Rethinking Pei: A Centenary Symposium,” which begins tomorrow at the Harvard Graduate School of Design, an examination of Pei’s use of light in museums can contribute an important cultural emphasis.

Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum, Cleveland / USA. Architecture: Pei Cobb Freed & Partners Architects. Image © Timothy Hursley Night view of Suzhou Museum, Suzhou / China. Architecture: Pei Partnership Architects. Photography: Kerin Ip. Image © Pei Partnership Architects Atrium at Deutsches Historisches Museum (German Historical Museum), Berlin / Germany. Architecture: Pei Associates, New York. Photography: Rudi Meisel. Image © ERCO GmbH, www.erco.com Tetrahedral glass tent at Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum, Cleveland / USA. Architecture: Pei Cobb Freed & Partners Architects. Image © Panoramio user Bohao Zhao <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Rock_%5E_Roll_Hall_of_Frame_-_panoramio.jpg'>via Wikimedia</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/deed.en'>CC BY 3.0</a> + 29