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Martine Hamilton Knight

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Teaching and Learning Building / Make Architects

09:00 - 30 March, 2019
Teaching and Learning Building / Make Architects, © Make Architects
© Make Architects

© Martine Hamilton Knight © Make Architects © Make Architects © Make Architects + 33

Women in Architecture Photography: 12 Names to Know

05:00 - 12 February, 2019
Women in Architecture Photography: 12 Names to Know, © Leana Cagnotto
© Leana Cagnotto

In many parts of the world, more women have architectural degrees than men. However, this fact hasn’t translated past university into the working world as women continue to be underrepresented across nearly all levels of practice.

The conversation regarding women in architecture gained tremendous traction back in 2013 with the petition for Denise Scott Brown to be recognized as the 1991 Pritzker Prize winner, alongside her husband and the consequent rejection of that request by Pritzker. The Architectural Review and Architect's Journal have, since 2015, jointly presented awards to the exceptional female practitioners as part of their Women in Architecture Awards program. The swelling of these movements have helped to promote not only the role but also the recognition of women in architecture.

10 Boathouses That Take Architecture Over the Edge of Dry Land

08:00 - 14 June, 2018
10 Boathouses That Take Architecture Over the Edge of Dry Land, © Paul Ott photografiert
© Paul Ott photografiert

Whether lining a river bustling with rowing crews or sitting calmly at the edge of a lake, boathouses have a storied history and an inexplicable romance to match their unusual program. Designed for use as a training facility for elite rowers, a vacationer’s waterfront playground, shoreline retreat, or even as a historical preservation project, boathouses captivate the imagination as they transcend the limits of the land-form relationship on their site.

2017 Arcaid Awards Reveals Shortlist for World's Best Building Image

11:40 - 2 October, 2017

Arcaid Images has revealed the shortlist of 20 images in the running for the title of World’s Best Building Image in their 2017 Arcaid Images Architectural Photography Awards. The annual award selects photographs in four categories - Exterior, Interior, Sense of Place, and Building in Use - which are judged by an esteemed panel of designers, photographers and journalists based on their atmospheric quality, composition, use of scale and more.

“More than just informing people about the existence of such places, the best photos go beyond that and entice people to learn more about the buildings, cities, and landscapes – maybe even booking a flight to see them firsthand. That feeling hit me on numerous occasions,” said jury member John Hill, Editor of the World-Architects eMagazine.

17 Projects Win 2017 RIBA East Awards

13:15 - 19 May, 2017
17 Projects Win 2017 RIBA East Awards, © Will Scott
© Will Scott

The Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) has announced 17 winning projects in the 2017 RIBA East Awards. Topped by Walters & Cohen Architects' Vajrasana Buddhist Retreat Centre in Suffolk which won the RIBA East Building of the Year Award, these 17 regional winners will go on to compete in RIBA's national awards, with the best in the national awards ultimately going forward to compete for the Stirling Prize.

"It was just fabulous to see the diversity and exceptional quality of buildings around the region," said RIBA East Regional Director Louise Todd. "The jury had a really difficult task in selecting the winners, which says a lot for the strength of the shortlist and the creativity of the architects involved."

© Alan Williams © Johan Dehlin © Martine Hamilton Knight © Dirk Lindner + 84

RIBA Announces 46 Winners for 2016 National Awards

19:01 - 22 June, 2016
RIBA Announces 46 Winners for 2016 National Awards, Courtesy of RIBA
Courtesy of RIBA

The Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) has announced the winners of the 2016 RIBA National Awards. The shortlist for the RIBA Stirling Prize for the UK’s best building of the year will be drawn from these 46 award-winning buildings.

Shortlist Announced for 2016 RIBA East Midlands Awards

08:00 - 13 March, 2016
Oundle School Pavilion / Levitate. Image © Toby Knipping
Oundle School Pavilion / Levitate. Image © Toby Knipping

A total of 12 projects have been shortlisted for the 2016 RIBA East Midlands Awards. The shortlisted buildings will be assessed by a regional jury, and winners will be announced on April 27. Regional winners will then be considered for a RIBA National Award, and National winners are then considered for the RIBA Stirling Prize for the best building of the year.

The 12 projects shortlisted for the 2016 RIBA East Midlands Awards are:

Shortlist Announced For 2015 RIBA East Midlands Awards

05:00 - 31 March, 2015
Shortlist Announced For 2015 RIBA East Midlands Awards, Shortlisted: Parkside, Matlock / Evans Vettori Architects. Image © Tristan Poyser
Shortlisted: Parkside, Matlock / Evans Vettori Architects. Image © Tristan Poyser

A total of eleven projects have been shortlisted for RIBA East Midlands 2015 Awards, featuring buildings by Evans Vettori, Make, Orms, and Studio Gedye. All shortlisted buildings will now be assessed by a regional jury. Regional winners will then be considered for a RIBA National Award in recognition of their architectural excellence, the results of which will place some projects in the running for the 2015 .

See the complete list of shortlisted projects after the break.

Shortlist Announced For 2015 RIBA Yorkshire Awards

04:00 - 27 March, 2015
Shortlist Announced For 2015 RIBA Yorkshire Awards, Shortlisted: Sheffield Cathedral, Sheffield / Thomas Ford and Partners. Image © Exposure Property Marketing
Shortlisted: Sheffield Cathedral, Sheffield / Thomas Ford and Partners. Image © Exposure Property Marketing

A total of eleven projects have been shortlisted for RIBA Yorkshire 2015 Awards, featuring buildings by Populous, HLM, and Studio Gedye. All shortlisted buildings will now be assessed by a regional jury. Regional winners will then be considered for a RIBA National Award in recognition of their architectural excellence, the results of which will place some projects in the running for the 2015 .

See the complete list of shortlisted projects after the break.

The Story of Maggie's Centres: How 17 Architects Came to Tackle Cancer Care

01:00 - 27 April, 2014
The Story of Maggie's Centres: How 17 Architects Came to Tackle Cancer Care, Dundee, Scotland, 2003 by Frank Gehry / Courtesy of Maggie's Centres. ImageThe third center was designed by Frank Gehry, a close friend of Maggie's. “Frank gave us so much publicity, and allowed us to raise the money,” Jencks says. Each center is self-financed through donations.
Dundee, Scotland, 2003 by Frank Gehry / Courtesy of Maggie's Centres. ImageThe third center was designed by Frank Gehry, a close friend of Maggie's. “Frank gave us so much publicity, and allowed us to raise the money,” Jencks says. Each center is self-financed through donations.

Maggie's Centres are the legacy of Margaret Keswick Jencks, a terminally ill woman who had the notion that cancer treatment environments and their results could be drastically improved through good design. Her vision was realized and continues to be realized today by numerous architects, including Frank Gehry, Zaha Hadid, and Snøhetta - just to name a few. Originally appearing in Metropolis Magazine as Living with Cancer,” this article by Samuel Medina features images of Maggie's Centres around the world, taking a closer look at the organization's roots and its continued success through the aid of architects.

It was May 1993, and writer and designer Margaret Keswick Jencks sat in a windowless corridor of a small Scottish hospital, dreading what would come next. The prognosis was bad—her cancer had returned—but the waiting, and the waiting room, were draining. Over the next two years until her death, she returned several times for chemo drips. In such neglected, thoughtless spaces, she wrote, patients like herself were left to “wilt” under the desiccating glare of fluorescent lights.

Wouldn’t it be better to have a private, light-filled space in which to await the results of the next bout of tests, or from which to contemplate, in silence, the findings? If architecture could demoralize patients—could “contribute to extreme and mental enervation,” as Keswick Jencks observed—could it not also prove restorative?

Highlands, Scotland, 2005 by Page\Park Architects / Courtesy of Page\Park Architects. ImageA collaboration between Page\Park and Charles Jencks, Maggie's Centre Inverness at Highlands weaves together building and landscape in a unified composition. The design invokes the formal properties of mitosis or cell division; scaled up, they are manifested in the swirling landscape mounds and the center's spiraling form. "The cell is the unit of life: dynamic, really exciting, a factory of life itself, and I thought it was time to celebrate the cell," Jencks has said in the past. Fife, Scotland, 2006 by Zaha Hadid Architects / © Werner Huthmacher. ImageAll sharp angles and painted a sinister black, Zaha Hadid's Fife center isn't the first thing you'd expect from a Maggie's Centre. The exterior invited comparisons to a bunker, despite the airy, humane spaces within. "Zaha got a lot of criticism and her building is bloody good," Jencks says of his former student's design. The building was the architect's first in the UK. Manchester, England, 2016 by Fosters + Partners / Courtesy of Fosters + Partners. ImageThe next center is set to open in Manchester, where Norman Foster was born and raised. “Norman came to us, and I was waiting because he is an old friend of mine,” Jencks says. “He had cancer, and because of his own experiences, he was really interested in doing this. He’s got everything he’s ever wanted in this building.” Aberdeen, Scotland, 2013 by Snøhetta / © Philip Vile . ImageThe center's cocoon-like shell packs a big, Niemeyer-esque punch despite its modest proportions. The interiors, however, reveal a Scandinavian influence, with extensive timber coverings and exquisite stone accents. The building has been nicknamed "the Pebble" by locals. + 11

Exhibition / Maggie's Centres: A Blueprint for Cancer Care

00:00 - 11 March, 2014
Exhibition / Maggie's Centres: A Blueprint for Cancer Care, © Martine Hamilton Knight
© Martine Hamilton Knight

Maggie’s Cancer Caring Centres are for anyone affected by cancer. Built on the grounds of cancer hospitals, they are designed to be warm, welcoming places that provide practical, emotional, and social support. Conceived by the late Maggie Keswick Jencks, along with her husband Charles Jencks, as a direct response to her own experience with cancer, the first Maggie’s Centre in Edinburgh opened its doors to the public in 1996. Since then, Maggie’s has grown to 17 centers across the United Kingdom and beyond, with many more to follow.

Michael Baker Boathouse / Associated Architects

01:00 - 13 May, 2013
Michael Baker Boathouse / Associated Architects, © Martine Hamilton Knight
© Martine Hamilton Knight

© Martine Hamilton Knight © Martine Hamilton Knight © Martine Hamilton Knight © Martine Hamilton Knight + 14

Maggie’s Nottingham / CZWG Architects

14:00 - 18 July, 2012
Maggie’s Nottingham / CZWG Architects, © Martine Hamilton Knight
© Martine Hamilton Knight

© Martine Hamilton Knight © Martine Hamilton Knight © Martine Hamilton Knight © Martine Hamilton Knight + 18