the world's most visited architecture website
i

Sign up now and start saving and organizing your favorite architecture projects and photos

Sign up now to save and organize your favorite architecture projects

i

Find the most inspiring products for your projects in our Product Catalog.

Find the most inspiring products in our Product Catalog.

i

Get the ArchDaily Chrome Extension and be inspired with every new tab. Install here »

i

All over the world, architects are finding cool ways to re-use run-down old buildings. Click here to see the best in Refurbishment Architecture.

Want to see the coolest refurbishment projects? Click here.

i

Immerse yourself in inspiring buildings with our selection of 360 videos. Click here.

See our immersive, inspiring 360 videos. Click here.

All
Projects
Products
Events
Competitions

Laurian Ghinitoiu

BROWSE ALL FROM THIS PHOTOGRAPHER HERE

AD Classics: New Museum / SANAA

22:00 - 14 October, 2018
AD Classics: New Museum / SANAA, © Laurian Ghinitoiu
© Laurian Ghinitoiu

This article was originally published on July 22, 2016. To read the stories behind other celebrated architecture projects, visit our AD Classics section.

The New Museum is the product of a daring vision to establish a radical, politicized center for contemporary art in New York City. With the aim of distinguishing itself from the city’s existing art institutions through a focus on emerging artists, the museum’s name embodies its pioneering spirit. Over the two decades following its foundation in 1977, it gained a strong reputation for its bold artistic program, and eventually outgrew its inconspicuous home in a SoHo loft. Keen to establish a visual presence and to reach a wider audience, in 2003 the Japanese architectural firm SANAA was commissioned to design a dedicated home for the museum. The resulting structure, a stack of rectilinear boxes which tower over the Bowery, would be the first and, thus far, the only purpose-built contemporary art museum in New York City.[1]

© Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu + 30

AD Classics: Master Plan for Chandigarh / Le Corbusier

16:30 - 6 October, 2018
AD Classics: Master Plan for Chandigarh / Le Corbusier, © Laurian Ghinitoiu
© Laurian Ghinitoiu

On August 15, 1947, on the eve of India’s independence from the United Kingdom, came a directive which would transform the subcontinent for the next six decades. In order to safeguard the country’s Muslim population from the Hindu majority, the departing colonial leaders set aside the northwestern and eastern portions of the territory for their use. Many of the approximately 100 million Muslims living scattered throughout India were given little more than 73 days to relocate to these territories, the modern-day nations of Pakistan and Bangladesh. As the borders for the new countries were drawn by Sir Cyril Radcliffe (an Englishman whose ignorance of Indian history and culture was perceived, by the colonial government, as an assurance of his impartiality), the state of Punjab was bisected between India and Pakistan, the latter of which retained ownership of the state capital of Lahore.[1] It was in the wake of this loss that Punjab would found a new state capital: one which would not only serve the logistical requirements of the state, but make an unequivocal statement to the entire world that a new India—modernized, prosperous, and independent—had arrived.

© Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu + 59

Spotlight: Le Corbusier

05:30 - 6 October, 2018
Spotlight: Le Corbusier, Notre Dame du Haut at Ronchamp. Image © <a href='www.flickr.com/photos/9160678@N06/2089042156'>Flickr user scarletgreen</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a>
Notre Dame du Haut at Ronchamp. Image © Flickr user scarletgreen licensed under CC BY 2.0

Born in the small Swiss city of La Chaux-de-Fonds, Charles-Édouard Jeanneret-Gris—better known by his pseudonym Le Corbusier (October 6, 1887 – August 27, 1965)—is widely regarded as the most important architect of the 20th century. As a gifted architect, provocative writer, divisive urban planner, talented painter, and unparalleled polemicist, Le Corbusier was able to influence some of the world’s most powerful figures, leaving an indelible mark on architecture that can be seen in almost any city worldwide.

Palace of the Assembly at Chandigarh. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/70608042@N00/1321525329'>Flickr user chiara_facchetti</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/'>CC BY-SA 2.0</a> Villa Savoye. Image © Flavio Bragaia Church at Firminy. Image © Richard Weil Swiss Pavilion. Image © Samuel Ludwig + 25

MINI LIVING Urban Cabin / Penda

12:20 - 3 October, 2018
MINI LIVING Urban Cabin / Penda, © Xia Zhi
© Xia Zhi

© Laurian Ghinitoiu © Xia Zhi © Xia Zhi © Laurian Ghinitoiu + 38

Spotlight: Bjarke Ingels

13:05 - 2 October, 2018
Spotlight: Bjarke Ingels, Lego House. Image Courtesy of LEGO Group
Lego House. Image Courtesy of LEGO Group

Danish architect Bjarke Ingels (born 2 October 1974) is often cited as one of the most inspirational architects of our time. At an age when many architects are just beginning to establish themselves in professional practice, Ingels has already won numerous competitions and achieved a level of critical acclaim (and fame) that is rare for new names in the industry. His work embodies a rare optimism that is simultaneously playful, practical, and immediately accessible.

Denmark Pavilion, Shanghai Expo 2010. Image © Iwan Baan VM Houses / BIG + JDS. Image Courtesy of BIG Danish National Maritime Museum. Image © Rasmus Hjortshõj 2016 Serpentine Pavilion. Image © Iwan Baan + 26

Ants House / Studio MIOLK

03:00 - 2 October, 2018
© Laurian Ghinitoiu
© Laurian Ghinitoiu

© Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu + 24

  • Architects

  • Location

    Iași, Romania
  • Lead Architects

    Adriana Gheorghiescu, Alexandra Berdan
  • Area

    170.0 m2
  • Project Year

    2017
  • Photographs

Shortlist for the 2018 Architectural Photography Awards Revealed

11:00 - 1 October, 2018
Shortlist for the 2018 Architectural Photography Awards Revealed, Long Museum West Bund Shanghai China by Atelier Deshaus. Image © Pawel Paniczko
Long Museum West Bund Shanghai China by Atelier Deshaus. Image © Pawel Paniczko

The shortlist for the 2018 Architectural Photography Awards have been revealed, bringing together 20 atmospheric images of the built environment. Categories this year ranged from a “portfolio of an individual building to a single abstract: with a professional camera or on a mobile phone.”

The 2018 edition saw a record number of entries, with photographs from 47 countries, including the UK (28%), USA (20%), Germany (6%), and China (5%). The 20 photographs were selected from four categories: exteriors, interiors, sense of place, and buildings in use.

Block+Void House / Bundschuh Architekten

02:00 - 25 September, 2018
© Laurian Ghinitoiu
© Laurian Ghinitoiu

© Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu + 39

  • Architects

  • Location

    Michaelkirchstrasse 12, Berlin, Germany
  • Lead Architects

    Roger Bundschuh, Yannis Efstathiou, Michelle Gross , Fabian Schwade, Philipp Ockert
  • Structural Engineers

    ifb Frohloff, Staffa, Kühl, Ecker
  • Technical design

    Energiebüro Fuetterer und Ruppmann, Berlin
  • Area

    1100.0 m2
  • Project Year

    2017
  • Photographs

The Technology Before the Wheel: A Brief History of Dry Stone Construction

09:30 - 25 August, 2018
The Technology Before the Wheel: A Brief History of Dry Stone Construction, © Fabricio Guzmán
© Fabricio Guzmán

A collection of stones piled one on top of the other, dry stone is an iconic building method found just nearly everywhere in the world. Relying solely on an age-old craft to create sturdy, reliable structures and characterised by its rustic, interlocking shapes, the technique has deep roots that stretch back even before the invention of the wheel. Its principles are simple: stack the stones to create a unified, load-bearing wall. But the efficient, long-lasting results, coupled with the technique’s cultural significance, have lead to continued use and updated interpretations all the way to contemporary architecture today.

© <a href='https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Broch_of_Mousa_-_geograph.org.uk_-_2800.jpg'>Anne Burgess</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/deed.en'>CC BY-SA 2.0</a> © Iwan Baan © Iwan Baan © Laurian Ghinitoiu + 11

MINI Living Urban Cabin / FreelandBuck

11:00 - 23 August, 2018
MINI Living Urban Cabin / FreelandBuck, © Laurian Ghinitoiu, Courtesy MINI
© Laurian Ghinitoiu, Courtesy MINI

© Laurian Ghinitoiu, Courtesy MINI © Laurian Ghinitoiu, Courtesy MINI © Laurian Ghinitoiu, Courtesy MINI © Laurian Ghinitoiu, Courtesy MINI + 40

  • Architects

  • Location

    Los Angeles, CA, United States
  • Lead Architects

    David Freeland and Brennan Buck
  • Design Team

    Alex Kim, Taka Tachibe, Michael Raymundo, Vivian Pham
  • Area

    240.0 ft2
  • Project Year

    2018
  • Photographs

Cities are Avoiding Hosting the Olympics. They Shouldn’t.

09:30 - 16 August, 2018
Cities are Avoiding Hosting the Olympics. They Shouldn’t., © Iwan Baan
© Iwan Baan

The apple of every athlete's eye, the Olympic Games direct the gaze of the world onto one host city every two years, showcasing the best that sport has to offer across both summer and winter events. In a haze of feel-good anticipation, the general buzz around the city before during the four week stretch is palpable, with tourists, media and athletes alike generating contributing to the fervour. With almost an almost exclusively positive public response (the majority of Olympic bids are met with 70% approval or higher), the Games become an opportunity for a nation to showcases their culture and all it has to offer. At first glance, it's an opportunity you'd be a fool to miss.

Yet as the dust settles, these ‘lucky’ host cities are often left with structures that lack the relevance and function of their initial, fleeting lives. Empty aquatics centers, derelict running tracks and rarely-used stadiums have become as much a trademark of the Games as the Rings, with the structural maintenance and social implications burdening former hosts for years to come. In recent years, fewer cities have been taking part in the bidding process, suggesting that the impact of the Games is beginning to catch up with the excitement. As many as 12 cities contended for the honor of hosting the 2004 games; only two were put forward for 2024/28.

Courtesy of Redskins and CBS News Courtesy of SIC Mostovik © Laurian Ghinitoiu Courtesy of Zaha Hadid Architects + 11

Shenzhen Energy Mansion / BIG

00:00 - 8 August, 2018
© Laurian Ghinitoiu
© Laurian Ghinitoiu

© Chao Zhang © Chao Zhang © Chao Zhang © Laurian Ghinitoiu + 25

  • Architects

  • Location

    Shenzhen, Guangdong, China
  • Partners in Charge

    Bjarke Ingels, Andreas Klok Pedersen
  • Project Manager

    Martin Voelkle
  • Project Leaders

    Song He, Andre Schmidt
  • Area

    96000.0 m2
  • Project Year

    2018
  • Photographs

Look Inside the Vatican Venice Biennale Chapels in New Video from Spirit of Space

14:00 - 29 July, 2018
Norman Foster. Image Courtesy of Foster + Partners
Norman Foster. Image Courtesy of Foster + Partners

Vatican City participated in the Venice Architecture Biennale for the first time this year, inviting the public to explore a sequence of unique chapels designed by renowned architects including Norman Foster and Eduardo Souto de Moura. Located in the woods that cover the island of San Giorgio Maggiore, the chapels offer interpretations of Gunnar Asplund’s 1920 chapel at Woodland Cemetery in Stockholm, a seminal example of modernist memorial architecture set in a similarly natural wooded context.

A new video produced by Spirit of Space offers a brief virtual tour of the structures that make up the Holy See’s pavilion, lingering on each just long enough to show different views and angles. As members of the public circulate through the chapels in each shot, the scenes give an impression of how each chapel guides circulation.

Spotlight: Santiago Calatrava

12:00 - 28 July, 2018
Spotlight: Santiago Calatrava, The Quadracci Pavilion at Milwaukee Art Museum. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/bvincent/18091164/'>Flickr user bvincent</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/'>CC BY-ND 2.0</a>
The Quadracci Pavilion at Milwaukee Art Museum. Image © Flickr user bvincent licensed under CC BY-ND 2.0

Known for his daring neo-futurist sculptural buildings and over 50 bridges worldwide, Santiago Calatrava (born July 28, 1951) is one of the most celebrated and controversial architects working today. Trained as both an architect and structural engineer, Calatrava has been lauded throughout his career for his work that seems to defy physical laws and imbues a sense of motion into still objects.

The City of Arts and Sciences of Valencia. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/timsnell/9153338448/in/photolist-eWRfC9-fVep9z'>Flickr user timsnell</a> licensed under <a href='http://https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/'>CC BY-ND 2.0</a> The Quadracci Pavilion at Milwaukee Art Museum. Image © <a href='www.flickr.com/photos/jimsphotoworld/9289498404/'>Flickr user jimsphotoworld</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/'>CC BY-SA 2.0</a> World Trade Center Transportation Hub. Image © Santiago Calatrava Museum of Tomorrow. Image © Gustavo Xavier  + 17

Porcelain Tiles Add a Sleek Modern Accent to AL_A's Courtyard Expansion at London's V&A Museum

08:00 - 10 July, 2018
Porcelain Tiles Add a Sleek Modern Accent to AL_A's Courtyard Expansion at London's V&A Museum, © Laurian Ghinitoiu
© Laurian Ghinitoiu

Completed last year, AL_A's porcelain public courtyard at London's V&A Museum is the largest architectural intervention and restoration of the site in more than 100 years. AL_A also designed a new colonnade and a column-free exhibition gallery. The design connects the space with the neighboring buildings on site, giving the museum a more streamlined sequence between gallery spaces.

© Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu + 20

Contemporary Religious Architecture That Rethinks Traditional Spaces for Worship

06:00 - 26 June, 2018
© Fabrice Fouillet
© Fabrice Fouillet

Constructing places of worship has always been an intricate practice, managing to detach the human, and release the boundary between body, mind, and spirit. Holy presence has been crucial in designing and constructing sacred places, which is why almost all religious building possessed similar characteristics: grandiosity, monolithic material, natural elements, and a plan that compliments an individual’s circulation through the space. Contemporary religious structures, however, found a way to adapt to the evolution of architecture. Unlike the Gothic or Baroque periods, modern-day architecture does not have a dominant identity. It is, in fact, a combination of postmodernism, futurism, minimalism, and everything in between. Architects have found a way to transform these exclusive, religion-devoted places into structures of spirituality, manifestation, and fascination.

Here is a selection of contemporary religious buildings that prove once again that architects are breaking all boundaries of creativity.

© Adam Letch Courtesy of S.M.A.O © Ahmad Mirzaee Courtesy of Kojii Fuji / Nacasa & Partners Inc. + 24

Step Inside Frida Escobedo's Serpentine Pavilion with This 360° Virtual Tour

12:00 - 25 June, 2018
Step Inside Frida Escobedo's Serpentine Pavilion with This 360° Virtual Tour, © Laurian Ghinitoiu
© Laurian Ghinitoiu

For readers around the world who monitored with enthusiasm the opening of Frida Escobedo’s Serpentine Pavilion, but were unable to reach London to experience it in real life, Photographer Nikhilesh Haval of nikreations is here to help.

Similar to previous productions of BIG’s 2016 Pavilion, and SelgasCano’s 2015 Pavilion, Haval 360-degree virtual tour explores Escobedo’s pavilion to capture aesthetic delights such as the Mexican celosias façade, shallow water pool, and curving, mirrored roof element. When inside the courtyard, don’t forget to look up!

Opinion: The Chilean Pavilion Offers the 2018 Venice Biennale's Most Powerful Architectural Statement

09:30 - 24 June, 2018
Opinion: The Chilean Pavilion Offers the 2018 Venice Biennale's Most Powerful Architectural Statement, © Laurian Ghinitoiu
© Laurian Ghinitoiu

This article was originally published by Common Edge as "STADIUM: the Venice Biennale’s Most Powerful Architectural Statement."

The opening of the Venice Biennale has about it a general sense of raucousness and aesthetic cacophony. The entire scene is lush, almost overwhelmingly rich. There are thousands of places for eyes to land. There are outfits: the salty, wet Venice air manages to get at least a few architects to ditch the all-black outfit for its all-white summer counterpart, often cut through with brightly colored, geometric jewelry. There are events: at any given moment, at any point throughout the weekend, there’s a dozen or so architects gathered on a panel to talk about a topic relevant to a pavilion theme, or the edition theme, or to architecture generally. There are parties, picnics along canals, Aperol spritzes that glow bright orange, and designed-to-death tote bags that run out so quickly just carrying them is a sign that you were there, part of the early crowd, in the mix.

It’s all swirling and chaotic and bright and somehow you have to manage to pay attention to serious ideas about architecture while attempting to figure out how it’s possible that you’re still sweating even though it’s 4PM.