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"Mnemonics": The Romania Pavilion at the 2018 Venice Biennale

04:00 - 19 June, 2018
"Mnemonics": The Romania Pavilion at the 2018 Venice Biennale, © Laurian Ghinitoiu
© Laurian Ghinitoiu

As part of our 2018 Venice Architecture Biennale coverage, we present the completed Romania Pavilion. Below, the curatorial team describes the exhibition in their own words.

Mnemonics proposes a contemporary take on the event’s theme and takes an ultimately optimistic snapshot of the public urban space that Romanian society has seen transforming over the past decades. It raises the question of the social and cultural functions of the free public space in Romanian cities.

© Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu + 16

"Sunyata: The Poetics of Emptiness": The Indonesian Pavilion at the 2018 Venice Biennale

01:00 - 18 June, 2018
"Sunyata: The Poetics of Emptiness": The Indonesian Pavilion at the 2018 Venice Biennale, © Laurian Ghinitoiu
© Laurian Ghinitoiu

As part of our 2018 Venice Architecture Biennale coverage, we present the completed Indonesia Pavilion. Below, the curatorial team describes the exhibition in their own words. 

What if architecture has no form and shape? It will be freed.

© Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu + 10

Critical Round-Up: The 2018 Venice Biennale

09:30 - 15 June, 2018
Critical Round-Up: The 2018 Venice Biennale, Vatican Chapel by Javier Corvalán. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu
Vatican Chapel by Javier Corvalán. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu

The Venice Biennale, one of the most talked about events on the architectural calendar, has opened its doors to architects, designers, and visitors from all around the globe to witness the pavilions and installations that tackle this year’s theme: "Freespace." The curators, Irish architects Yvonne Farrell and Shelley McNamara of Grafton Architectsdescribed the theme as “a focus on architecture’s ability to provide free and additional spatial gifts to those who use it and on its ability to address the unspoken wishes of strangers, providing the opportunity to emphasize nature’s free gifts of light—sunlight and moonlight, air, gravity, materials—natural and man-made resources.” As the exhibition launched at the end of May, the architecture world rushed to Venice to be immersed in what the Biennale has to offer. But while the 2018 Biennale undoubtedly had its admirers, not everyone was impressed.  

Read on to find out what the critics had to say on this year’s Venice Biennale.

German Pavilion . Image © Jan Bitter Australia Pavilion. Image © Rory Gardiner Vatican Chapel by Teronobu Fujimori. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu Philip Yuan's "Cloud Village" installation at the Chinese Pavilion. Image © Lim Zhang + 14

Frida Escobedo's Serpentine Pavilion Photographed by Laurian Ghinitoiu

14:00 - 13 June, 2018
Frida Escobedo's Serpentine Pavilion Photographed by Laurian Ghinitoiu, © Laurian Ghinitoiu
© Laurian Ghinitoiu

Following the opening of the 2018 Serpentine Pavillion this week, designed by Mexican architect Frida Escobedo, photographer Laurian Ghinitoiu has turned his lens to London. Ghinitoiu’s images, which you can discover below, capture the elemental beauty of Escobedo’s pavilion, defined by a permeable cement tile façade inspired by Mexican celosias.

Fusing elements typical to Mexican architecture with local London references, the pavilion centers on a courtyard enclosed by two rectangular volumes constructed using the characteristic celosia method.

© Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu + 30

WORKac Designs an 'Invisible' Penthouse in a Centuries-Old Cast-Iron Building

06:00 - 12 June, 2018
WORKac Designs an 'Invisible' Penthouse in a Centuries-Old Cast-Iron Building, © Laurian Ghinitoiu
© Laurian Ghinitoiu

At first glance, The Stealth Building looks like a pristinely-restored cast iron apartment building. That’s because technically, it is. But upon closer inspection, the Lower Manhattan building is rife with innovative restoration and renovation practices by WORKac.

© Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu + 23

"Freestanding" Exhibition Shows the Power and Poetry of Sigurd Lewerentz’s Architecture

04:00 - 12 June, 2018
"Freestanding" Exhibition Shows the Power and Poetry of Sigurd Lewerentz’s Architecture, © Laurian Ghinitoiu
© Laurian Ghinitoiu

As part of our 2018 Venice Architecture Biennale coverage, we present Freestanding, an exhibition in the Biennale's Central Pavilion. Below, the team describes their contribution in their own words.

Round-Up: The Serpentine Pavilion Through the Years

14:00 - 11 June, 2018
Round-Up: The Serpentine Pavilion Through the Years

Lasting for close to two decades now, the annual Serpentine Gallery Pavilion Exhibition has become one of the most anticipated architectural events in London and for the global architecture community. Each of the previous eighteen pavilions have been thought-provoking, leaving an indelible mark and strong message to the architectural community. And even though each of the past pavilions are removed from the site after their short summer stints to occupy far-flung private estates, they continue to be shared through photographs, and in architectural lectures. With the launch of the 18th Pavilion, we take a look back at all the previous pavilions and their significance to the architecturally-minded public. 

Serpentine Pavilion 2013. Image © Neil MacWilliams Serpentine Pavilion 2000. Image © Helene Binet Serpentine Pavilion 2006. Image © John Offenbach Serpentine Pavilion 2015. Image © Iwan Baan + 38

Frida Escobedo's 2018 Serpentine Pavilion Opens in London

09:35 - 11 June, 2018
Frida Escobedo's 2018 Serpentine Pavilion Opens in London, © Laurian Ghinitoiu
© Laurian Ghinitoiu

The 2018 Serpentine Gallery Pavilion, designed by Frida Escobedo, was unveiled today in London's Hyde Park. Escobedo's design, which fuses elements typical to Mexican architecture with local London references, features a courtyard enclosed by two rectangular volumes constructed from cement roof tiles. These tiles are stacked to form a celosia, a type of wall common to Mexican architecture which is permeable, allowing ventilation and views to the other side.

© Iwan Baan © Iwan Baan © Iwan Baan © Laurian Ghinitoiu + 11

Seeing Red: 4 Times the Color Has Enhanced Architecture and Why

06:00 - 11 June, 2018
© Helene Binet
© Helene Binet

Red is everywhere. From stop signs to bricks and lipstick to wine, our constant use of the color in everyday objects has slowly taken over our subconscious. Red is a color that always blends with the context, telling us how to feel or what to think, but why are we attracted to it? Why did cavemen choose ochre-based paint to draw on their walls? Why do revolutions always seem to use red to stir support? Why do we parade celebrities down red carpets, when green or blue would surely do the same job? While the answers to these questions may be vague and indefinite, red’s use in architecture is almost always meticulously calculated.

Courtesy of West 8 © Helene Binet licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/'>CC BY-SA 2.0</a>. Image © nenamaz © Filip Dujardin + 11

Dimensions of Citizenship: The US Pavilion at the 2018 Venice Biennale

04:00 - 11 June, 2018
Dimensions of Citizenship: The US Pavilion at the 2018 Venice Biennale, 1. U.S. Pavilion at the 16th International Architecture Exhibition. Courtesy of the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and the University of Chicago.. Image © Tom Harris
1. U.S. Pavilion at the 16th International Architecture Exhibition. Courtesy of the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and the University of Chicago.. Image © Tom Harris

As part of our 2018 Venice Architecture Biennale coverage, we present the completed United States Pavilion. To read the initial proposal, refer to our previously published posts, “Curators and Theme Announced for US Pavilion at 2018 Venice Biennale” and "Studio Gang, Diller Scofidio + Renfro Among Exhibitors Selected for US Pavilion at 2018 Venice Biennale"

The pavilion representing the United States at this year’s biennale brings together the work of seven different transdisciplinary teams who each prepared an installation addressing the concept of citizenship at a different scale. Entitled Dimensions of Citizenship, the exhibition is intended to challenge the definition and conception of citizenship, examining issues and citing examples on the scale of the citizen, civitas, region, nation, globe, network and cosmos. The pavilion was commissioned on behalf of the US Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs by the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and the University of Chicago.

Ecological Citizens by SCAPE at the 2018 U.S. Pavilion. Courtesy of the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and the University of Chicago.. Image © Tom Harris © Laurian Ghinitoiu MEXUS: A Geography of Interdependence by Estudio Teddy Cruz + Fonna Forman at the 2018 U.S. Pavilion. Courtesy of the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and the University of Chicago.. Image © Tom Harris Transit Screening Lounge at the 2018 U.S. Pavilion. Courtesy of the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and the University of Chicago.. Image © Tom Harris + 28

11 Must-See Exhibitions at the 2018 Venice Biennale

09:30 - 7 June, 2018
11 Must-See Exhibitions at the 2018 Venice Biennale, Arsenale. Image Courtesy of la Biennale di Venezia
Arsenale. Image Courtesy of la Biennale di Venezia

As always, this year’s edition of the Venice Architecture Biennale is brimming with exhibitions and installations—the result of thousands upon thousands of hours of research and work. When arriving at the Arsenale or Giardini, the overwhelming amount of "things to see" are neatly tucked into the national pavilions, or, in the case of the Arsenale, hidden on the sides of the sweeping corridor. In the likely event that you have limited time to enjoy all that FREESPACE has to offer, ArchDaily's editors have selected our favorite works displayed at the 16th International Architecture Exhibition.

Here, presented in no particular order, are some of our top suggestions from across the Biennale sites.

Vatican Chapel / Foster + Partners

03:00 - 7 June, 2018
Vatican Chapel / Foster + Partners, © Nigel Young / Foster+Partners
© Nigel Young / Foster+Partners

© Laurian Ghinitoiu © Nigel Young / Foster+Partners © Nigel Young / Foster+Partners © Laurian Ghinitoiu + 21

Spotlight: Norman Foster

04:00 - 1 June, 2018
Spotlight: Norman Foster, Spaceport America. Image © Nigel Young
Spaceport America. Image © Nigel Young

Arguably the leading name of a generation of internationally high-profile British architects, Norman Foster (born 1 June 1935)—or to give him his full title Norman Robert Foster, Baron Foster of Thames Bank of Reddish, OM, HonFREng—gained recognition as early as the 1970s as a key architect in the high-tech movement, which continues to have a profound impact on architecture as we know it today.

Queen Alia International Airport. Image © Nigel Young / Foster + Partners The Gherkin . Image © Nigel Young Hearst Tower. Image © Chuck Choi Beijing Airport. Image Courtesy of Foster + Partners + 46

Becoming: Spanish Pavilion at the Venice Biennale 2018

04:45 - 26 May, 2018
Becoming: Spanish Pavilion at the Venice Biennale 2018, Courtesy of La Biennale di Venezia. Image © Italo Rondinella
Courtesy of La Biennale di Venezia. Image © Italo Rondinella

As part of our 2018 Venice Architecture Biennale coverage, we present the completed Spanish Pavilion. Below, the curatorial team describes the exhibition in their own words. 

Becoming
, the Spanish Pavilion at the Venice Biennale 2018, seeks to respond to the general theme of the event through the proposals and research being developed in the different learning environments within the country, placing special emphasis on the architect's new multidisciplinary profile.

The exhibition, curated by the architect Atxu Amann, has occupied most of its budget in restoring the building in which it is located, "tattooing" its interior walls to load them with 143 proposals that are unified through 52 relevant concepts to our discipline today.

© Ana Matos © Ana Matos © Ana Matos © Gonzalo Pardo + 17

10 Chapels in a Venice Forest Comprise The Vatican's First Ever Biennale Contribution

12:00 - 25 May, 2018
Aerial view. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu
Aerial view. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu

With the opening of the 16th Venice Architecture Biennale comes a look at the first ever contribution by the Holy See, an exhibition that brings together architects to design chapels that, after the Biennale, can be relocated to sites around the globe.

Located in a wooded area on the Venetian island of San Giorgio Maggiore, 10 chapels by architects including Norman Foster, Eduardo Souto de Moura, and Smiljan Radic, are joined by the Asplund Chapel by MAP Architects. This 11th structure serves as a prelude to the other chapels, while reflecting on Gunnar Asplund's 1920 design for the Woodland Chapel.

7 Architects Create 7 New Community Spaces Beneath a Disused Japanese Overpass

08:00 - 17 May, 2018
7 Architects Create 7 New Community Spaces Beneath a Disused Japanese Overpass, © Laurian Ghinitoiu
© Laurian Ghinitoiu

A +100 meter stretch of land beneath a train overpass in Koganecho, a district of Yokohama, Japan, underwent a progressive refurbishment in which seven different types of community space, each designed by a different architect, were built within a pre-set spatial grid. Historically there were many social issues in the area, largely in relation to its profitable but dangerous black market and red-light district. Once the illegal activity was eradicated in 2005, the underpass presented a great opportunity for social re-development, and the resultant project - the Koganecho Centre - emphasized an age-old Japanese cultural commitment, where what was once broken is used to make something new. 

© Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu + 23

The "Four Pillars" of B.V. Doshi: Why All Architects Can Learn From the 2018 Pritzker Laureate

09:30 - 16 May, 2018
The "Four Pillars" of B.V. Doshi: Why All Architects Can Learn From the 2018 Pritzker Laureate, CEPT. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu
CEPT. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu

This article was originally published by Common Edge as "The Genius, Heart and Humility of Indian Architect B.V. Doshi."

I’m sitting in a busy suburban coffee-and-donut shop with the quiet, grandfatherly Indian architect, Jitendra Vaidya. When I started my life as an architecture intern in the late 90s, Jitendra was one of the most experienced technical designers I knew. Equally comfortable weighing the relative merits of various flashing details as he is discussing abstract design concepts, Jitendra is an old-school, universal architect. After more than half a century in a profession famous for grinding deadlines, Jitendra still maintains a joyful twinkle in his eye when he talks about architecture. So it’s no surprise that Jitendra is visibly animated today as he tells me about his teacher, the man who was just recognized as one of the world’s greatest living architects, B.V. Doshi.

For the Pritzker Prize—the profession’s highest honor—to be awarded to a 90-year-old academic urbanist who spent his long career primarily teaching architecture students and serving poor communities in India is a stunning development. To be fair, the caricature of Pritzker winners as arrogant, scarf- wrapped, Euro-American, Starchitects, is overblown and outdated. Recent winners such as Alejandro AravenaWang Shu, and Shigeru Ban, are connected in their mutual dedication to serving poor and displaced communities through innovative, culturally authentic designs. But even accepting this nuance, Doshi is fundamentally different from recent winners.

Spotlight: Aldo Rossi

04:00 - 3 May, 2018
Spotlight: Aldo Rossi, San Cataldo Cemetery. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu
San Cataldo Cemetery. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu

Ada Louise Huxtable once described him as “a poet who happens to be an architect.” Italian architect Aldo Rossi (3 May 1931 – 4 September 1997) was known for his drawings, urban theory, and for winning the Pritzker Prize in 1990. Rossi also directed the Venice Biennale in 1985 and 1986—one of only two people to have served as director twice.

Mojiko Hotel. Image © <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File%3AMojiko_Hotel.jpg'>Wikimedia user Wiiii</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en'>CC BY-SA 3.0</a> Quartier Schützenstrasse. Image © <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File%3ABerlin%2C_Mitte%2C_Zimmerstrasse_68-69%2C_Quartier_Schuetzenstrasse.jpg'>Wikimedia user Jörg Zägel</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en'>CC BY-SA 3.0</a> Bonnefantenmuseum. Image © James Taylor-Foster Gallaratese Quarter / Aldo Rossi & Carlo Aymonino. Image © Gili Merin + 8