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Laurian Ghinitoiu

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David Adjaye and Serpentine Galleries Release Call for Augmented Reality Installation

13:00 - 12 February, 2019
David Adjaye and Serpentine Galleries Release Call for Augmented Reality Installation, Augmented Reality. Image Courtesy of Matt Alderton
Augmented Reality. Image Courtesy of Matt Alderton

The Serpentine Galleries, Google Arts & Culture and trustee David Adjaye have released a call for augmented reality (AR) architecture proposals to run alongside the 2019 Serpentine Pavilion this summer. Applicants are asked to propose "imaginary city spaces and speculations on the built environment to be developed and experienced” in AR onsite at the galleries. The call invites applicants to consider AR as a digital layer that offers new opportunities to design, visualize and experience.

Architectural League of New York Announce Winners of the 2019 Emerging Voices Program

11:00 - 8 February, 2019

The Architectural League of New York has announced the winners of it's 2019 Emerging Voices, an award given annually to eight individuals/practices based in the US, Canada, or Mexico. The Emerging Voices program, which is now in its 37th year, seeks to spotlight the distinctive design voices with the potential to influence the field of architecture. 

The Emerging Voices award program has long been considered one of the most prestigious in North American architecture; a large portion of the 250 awarded practices are now well-known internationally. 

Occidentului 40 / ADNBA

06:00 - 6 February, 2019
Occidentului 40 / ADNBA

© Cosmin Dragomir © Laurian Ghinițoiu © Andrei Mărgulescu © Cosmin Dragomir + 24

  • Architects

  • Location

    40 Occidentului Street, Bucharest, Romania
  • Category

  • Lead Architects

    Adrian Untaru, Bogdan Brădățeanu, Andrei Șerbescu, Valentina Țigâră, Pavel Albu
  • Structure

    WERTYKL
  • Interior and Exterior finishes and façade

    EDIL CONSTRUCT 2004
  • Installations

    INSATERM
  • Client

    sc Dezvoltare Urbana srl
  • Area

    2765.6 m2
  • Project Year

    2017
  • Photographs

Occidentului 40, Photographed Through the Lens of Laurian Ghinitoiu

13:00 - 3 February, 2019
Occidentului 40, Photographed Through the Lens of Laurian Ghinitoiu, © Laurian Ghinitoiu
© Laurian Ghinitoiu

Occidentului Street is fairly typical for Bucharest - a combination of villas, wagon-houses, inter and post-war structures. ADN BA's Occidentului 40, recognized in the EU Mies Prize's 2019 shortlist, is a masterclass in architectural detail and subtlety. The volume is composed of blocks, each responding to the heights and rhythms of the surrounding context.

© Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu + 12

Architecture on Stage: Christ & Gantenbein

03:30 - 31 January, 2019
Architecture on Stage: Christ & Gantenbein, © Laurian Ghinitoiu
© Laurian Ghinitoiu

The practice of acclaimed Swiss architect duo Christ and Gantenbein will join together on stage to discuss past and future projects.

Reframing Climate Change as a Local Problem of Global Proportion: 4 Ways Architects can Deliver Change

07:00 - 28 January, 2019
Bankside 123 in London creates new routes, public spaces and retail, with three simple rectilinear buildings set within a permeable public realm designed to reconnect the site with its surroundings. Image Courtesy of Allies & Morrison
Bankside 123 in London creates new routes, public spaces and retail, with three simple rectilinear buildings set within a permeable public realm designed to reconnect the site with its surroundings. Image Courtesy of Allies & Morrison

The latest UN special report on climate change, released in October 2018, was bleak - perhaps unsurprisingly after a year of recording breaking temperatures, wildfires, floods, and storms. The report, released by the UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), reiterated the magnitude of climate change’s global impact, but shed new light on the problem’s depth and urgency. Climate change is a catastrophe for the world as we know it and will transform it into something that we don’t. And we have just 12 years to prevent it.

The Week in Architecture: Blue Monday and the Aspirations of a New Year

12:00 - 27 January, 2019
The Week in Architecture: Blue Monday and the Aspirations of a New Year, Courtesy of Pritzker Prize. Image © Hisao Suzuki
Courtesy of Pritzker Prize. Image © Hisao Suzuki

For those in the northern hemisphere, the last full week in January last week kicks off with Blue Monday - the day claimed to be the most depressing of the year. Weather is bleak, sunsets are early, resolutions are broken, and there’s only the vaguest glimpse of a holiday on the horizon. It’s perhaps this miserable context that is making the field seem extra productive, with a spate of new projects, toppings out and, completions announced this week.

The week of 21 January 2019 in review, after the break: 

LocHal / Mecanoo. Image © Ossip van Duivenbode © TMRW, courtesy of Gensler ©Jaime Navarro The Week in Architecture: Blue Monday and the Aspirations of a New Year + 11

Turin's Castello di Rivoli Tells a Story of the Region's History through Its Architecture

07:15 - 24 January, 2019
Castello di Rivoli / Andrea Bruno (Refurbishment). Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu
Castello di Rivoli / Andrea Bruno (Refurbishment). Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu

Given the sheer magnitude and influence of its recorded history, Italy as we know it is a surprisingly young country. For centuries, the region was divided between powerful (and sometimes warring) city-states, each with their own identity, culture, and, fortunes, and influence. Some are eternally famous. Rome is a cradle of history and heart of religion; cool Milan is a hub of contemporary fashion and design; Florence is synonymous with the Renaissance and all the epoch’s relationship to the arts.

Turin’s history is arguably less romantic. The small city in Savoy, a north-Italian region bordering France, has established an identity as an industrial powerhouse. It is home to FIAT and some of Italy’s finest universities; the streets are dotted with works by Nervi, Botta, and Rossi. But despite the design pedigree, perhaps nothing better illustrates the region’s faceted history better than Castello di Rivoli.

Castello di Rivoli / Andrea Bruno (Refurbishment). Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu Castello di Rivoli / Andrea Bruno (Refurbishment). Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu Castello di Rivoli / Andrea Bruno (Refurbishment). Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu Castello di Rivoli / Andrea Bruno (Refurbishment). Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu + 21

Spotlight: Gottfried Böhm

03:30 - 23 January, 2019
Spotlight: Gottfried Böhm, Neviges Mariendom. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu
Neviges Mariendom. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu

The career of Gottfried Böhm (born January 23, 1920) spans from simple to complex and from sacred to secular, but has always maintained a commitment to understanding its surroundings. In 1986, Böhm was awarded the eighth Pritzker Prize for what the jury described as his "uncanny and exhilarating marriage" of architectural elements from past and present. Böhm's unique use of materials, as well as his rejection of historical emulation, have made him an influential force in Germany and abroad.

Neviges Mariendom. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu Neviges Mariendom. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu Bensberg Town Hall (1963-1969) in Bensberg,Germany. Image © <a href=‘https://www.flickr.com/photos/seier/3301293417’>Flickr user seier</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/deed.en'>CC BY 2.0</a> Neviges Mariendom. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu + 10

Why Reusing Buildings Should - and Must - be the Next Big Thing

07:00 - 22 January, 2019
Why Reusing Buildings Should - and Must - be the Next Big Thing, LocHal / Mecanoo. Image © Ossip van Duivenbode
LocHal / Mecanoo. Image © Ossip van Duivenbode

Sustainability awards and standards touted by professional architecture organizations often stop at opening day, failing to take into account the day-to-day energy use of a building. With the current format unlikely to change, how can we rethink the way what sustainability means in architecture today? The first step might be to stop rewarding purpose-built architecture, and look instead to the buildings we already have. This article was originally published on CommonEdge as"Why Reusing Buildings Should be the Next Big Thing."

At the inaugural Rio Conference on the Global Environment in 1992, three facts became abundantly clear: the earth was indeed warming; fossil fuels were no longer a viable source of energy; the built environment would have to adapt to this new reality. That year I published an essay in the Journal of Architectural Education called “Architecture for a Contingent Environment” suggesting that architects join with both naturalists and preservationists to confront this situation.

Renzo Piano’s Renovation of the Harvard Art Museums is, Years On, a Quiet, Neighbourly Triumph

05:00 - 27 December, 2018
Renzo Piano’s Renovation of the Harvard Art Museums is, Years On, a Quiet, Neighbourly Triumph, © Laurian Ghinitoiu
© Laurian Ghinitoiu

On the surface, designing a new art museum for Harvard University is a brief so straightforward that it sounds like part of university curriculum itself. The program lends itself to the type of light and airy spaces architects dream of creating; the campus site promises both steady and engaged traffic. But, for all the apparent advantages, the road to realizing Harvard’s Art Museums was a deceptively complex one - one that ultimately took six years to see realized.

© Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu + 21

Dafa Canal Tourist Information Center / ZJJZ

21:00 - 26 December, 2018
© Laurian Ghinitoiu
© Laurian Ghinitoiu

© Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu Courtesy of ZJJZ Courtesy of ZJJZ + 33

  • Architects

  • Location

    Zunyi, Guizhou, China
  • Category

  • Lead Architects

    Zhenyu Cao, Xuanru Chen, Sean Shen, Yuying Kate Tsai
  • Clients

    Guizhou Dafa Tourism Development Co., Ltd.
  • Local Structural and MEP Engineer

    Guiyang Architectural Design & Surveying Prospecting Co., Ltd.
  • Area

    3280.0 m2
  • Project Year

    2018
  • Photographs

Cross Ventilation, the Chimney Effect and Other Concepts of Natural Ventilation

02:30 - 20 December, 2018
Sarah Kubitschek Hospital Salvador / João Filgueiras Lima. Image © Nelson Kon
Sarah Kubitschek Hospital Salvador / João Filgueiras Lima. Image © Nelson Kon

Nothing is more rational than using the wind, a natural, free, renewable and healthy resource, to improve the thermal comfort of our projects. The awareness of the finiteness of the resources and the demand for the reduction in the energy consumption has removed air-conditioning systems as the protagonist of any project. Architects and engineers are turning to this more passive system to improve thermal comfort. It is evident that there are extreme climates in which there is no escape, or else the use of artificial systems, but in a large part of the terrestrial surface it is possible to provide a pleasant flow of air through the environments by means of passive systems, especially if the actions are considered during the project stage.

This is a highly complex theme, but we have approached some of the concepts exemplifying them with built projects. A series of ventilation systems can help in the projects: natural cross ventilation, natural induced ventilation, chimney effect and evaporative cooling, which combined with the correct use of constructive elements allows improvement in thermal comfort and decrease in energy consumption.

How to Judge a Building: Does it Make you Feel More, Or Less Alive?

09:30 - 7 December, 2018
How to Judge a Building: Does it Make you Feel More, Or Less Alive? , via Wikimedia. ImageSelgas Cano's Pavilion at the 2018 Brugge Triennale
via Wikimedia. ImageSelgas Cano's Pavilion at the 2018 Brugge Triennale

This extract was originally published on Common Edge as "The Legacy of Christopher Alexander: Criteria for an Intelligent Architecture."

In his monumental four-volume book, The Nature of Order, Christopher Alexander talks about an intelligent architecture, responsive to human needs and sensibilities through adaptation to existing buildings and nature. This is a new way of viewing the world—a way of connecting to it, and to ourselves—yet it is very much the same as the most ancient ways of connecting.

The Project in a Small Japanese Village Setting the Standard for Zero-Waste Architecture

09:30 - 26 November, 2018
The Project in a Small Japanese Village Setting the Standard for Zero-Waste Architecture, © Laurian Ghinitoiu
© Laurian Ghinitoiu

Nestled in the steep gorges and river valleys of Japan’s Tokushima prefecture is Kamikatsu - a small town seemingly like any other. But Kamikatsu, unlike its neighbors (or indeed, most towns in the world), is nearly entirely waste-free.

Since 2003 - years before the movement gained widespread popularity - the town has committed to a zero-waste policy. The requirements are demanding: waste must be sorted in more than 30 categories, broken or obsolete items are donated or stripped for parts, unwanted items are left in a store for community exchange. But the residents’ efforts over the years have paid off- nearly 80% of all the village’s waste is recycled.

© Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu + 20

Modern as Metaphor: Where the Tate Stands in a Post-Brexit World

07:00 - 18 November, 2018
Modern as Metaphor: Where the Tate Stands in a Post-Brexit World, © Laurian Ghinitoiu
© Laurian Ghinitoiu

Editor's Note: This article was originally published on 30 June, 2016. While the debate surrounding the terms of the UK's exit from the European Union continues to rage, the Tate remains a steady icon for London and the UK. But the building has also become a symbol in a new fight: one between the capital's elites and the general public. As the political sands in Britain continue to shift, it may be interesting to see how - and with whom - the building aligns in the future. - Katherine Allen, Managing Editor

What Burning Man can Teach Architecture about Participatory Design

09:30 - 15 November, 2018
© Laurian Ghinitoiu
© Laurian Ghinitoiu

Architecture as a profession today struggles with questions of relevance, with core questions surrounding the issue of whether it can create cultural vibrancy and meaning for the diverse world it serves. Within our own design community, we tend to give a lot of sway to an “exclusive tier” of architects who provide leadership and vision. While this leadership is critically important to the profession, it only corresponds to 2% of what gets built. Take it from Frank Gehry, whose 2014 comment still rings in our ears: “98% of everything that is built and designed today is pure sh*t. There is no sense of design, no respect for humanity."

If we embrace the importance and unique value of all things built on a wider range, we need to ask ourselves: how have we served and rewarded our peers responsible for creating this other 98%?  Where should we set the bar for the emotional-artistic qualities of mainstream architecture?

Coal Drops Yard Photographed Through the Lens of Laurian Ghinitoiu

13:00 - 12 November, 2018
Coal Drops Yard Photographed Through the Lens of Laurian Ghinitoiu, Coal Drops Yard. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu
Coal Drops Yard. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu

Photographer Laurian Ghinitoiu has released new images of Heatherwick Studio’s Coal Drops Yard in London’s King's Cross. Unveiled to the public last month, the project includes two heritage rail buildings from the 1850s brought together as a new shopping district. The design extends the inner gabled roofs of Victorian coal drops to link the two viaducts together around shopping and public space.

Coal Drops Yard. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu Coal Drops Yard. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu Coal Drops Yard. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu Coal Drops Yard. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu + 26