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Laurian Ghinitoiu

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How to Judge a Building: Does it Make you Feel More, Or Less Alive?

09:30 - 7 December, 2018
How to Judge a Building: Does it Make you Feel More, Or Less Alive? , via Wikimedia. ImageSelgas Cano's Pavilion at the 2018 Brugge Triennale
via Wikimedia. ImageSelgas Cano's Pavilion at the 2018 Brugge Triennale

This extract was originally published on Common Edge as "The Legacy of Christopher Alexander: Criteria for an Intelligent Architecture."

In his monumental four-volume book, The Nature of Order, Christopher Alexander talks about an intelligent architecture, responsive to human needs and sensibilities through adaptation to existing buildings and nature. This is a new way of viewing the world—a way of connecting to it, and to ourselves—yet it is very much the same as the most ancient ways of connecting.

The Project in a Small Japanese Village Setting the Standard for Zero-Waste Architecture

09:30 - 26 November, 2018
The Project in a Small Japanese Village Setting the Standard for Zero-Waste Architecture, © Laurian Ghinitoiu
© Laurian Ghinitoiu

Nestled in the steep gorges and river valleys of Japan’s Tokushima prefecture is Kamikatsu - a small town seemingly like any other. But Kamikatsu, unlike its neighbors (or indeed, most towns in the world), is nearly entirely waste-free.

Since 2003 - years before the movement gained widespread popularity - the town has committed to a zero-waste policy. The requirements are demanding: waste must be sorted in more than 30 categories, broken or obsolete items are donated or stripped for parts, unwanted items are left in a store for community exchange. But the residents’ efforts over the years have paid off- nearly 80% of all the village’s waste is recycled.

© Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu + 20

Modern as Metaphor: Where the Tate Stands in a Post-Brexit World

07:00 - 18 November, 2018
Modern as Metaphor: Where the Tate Stands in a Post-Brexit World, © Laurian Ghinitoiu
© Laurian Ghinitoiu

Editor's Note: This article was originally published on 30 June, 2016. While the debate surrounding the terms of the UK's exit from the European Union continues to rage, the Tate remains a steady icon for London and the UK. But the building has also become a symbol in a new fight: one between the capital's elites and the general public. As the political sands in Britain continue to shift, it may be interesting to see how - and with whom - the building aligns in the future. - Katherine Allen, Managing Editor

What Burning Man can Teach Architecture about Participatory Design

09:30 - 15 November, 2018
© Laurian Ghinitoiu
© Laurian Ghinitoiu

Architecture as a profession today struggles with questions of relevance, with core questions surrounding the issue of whether it can create cultural vibrancy and meaning for the diverse world it serves. Within our own design community, we tend to give a lot of sway to an “exclusive tier” of architects who provide leadership and vision. While this leadership is critically important to the profession, it only corresponds to 2% of what gets built. Take it from Frank Gehry, whose 2014 comment still rings in our ears: “98% of everything that is built and designed today is pure sh*t. There is no sense of design, no respect for humanity."

If we embrace the importance and unique value of all things built on a wider range, we need to ask ourselves: how have we served and rewarded our peers responsible for creating this other 98%?  Where should we set the bar for the emotional-artistic qualities of mainstream architecture?

Coal Drops Yard Photographed Through the Lens of Laurian Ghinitoiu

13:00 - 12 November, 2018
Coal Drops Yard Photographed Through the Lens of Laurian Ghinitoiu, Coal Drops Yard. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu
Coal Drops Yard. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu

Photographer Laurian Ghinitoiu has released new images of Heatherwick Studio’s Coal Drops Yard in London’s King's Cross. Unveiled to the public last month, the project includes two heritage rail buildings from the 1850s brought together as a new shopping district. The design extends the inner gabled roofs of Victorian coal drops to link the two viaducts together around shopping and public space.

Coal Drops Yard. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu Coal Drops Yard. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu Coal Drops Yard. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu Coal Drops Yard. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu + 26

Bjarke Ingels' Burning Man ORB Captured through the Lens of Laurian Ghinitoiu

11:00 - 12 November, 2018
Bjarke Ingels' Burning Man ORB Captured through the Lens of Laurian Ghinitoiu, © Laurian Ghinitoiu
© Laurian Ghinitoiu

One of the star attractions of 2018’s Burning Man Festival was the ORB, designed and overseen by Bjarke Ingels, Iacob Lange & Laurent de Carniere. The 1/500,000 scale sphere of the Earth’s surface was designed to conceptually reference earth and human expression, intending to leave no trace following its deflation.

The designers wanted the giant sphere to act as a guiding landmark for festival-goers, and set up an Indiegogo campaign back in July to raise the remaining funding for the installation. In total, the team invested 30 tons of steel, 1,000 welding and sewing hours, and $300,000 of their own funds to make the ORB a reality.

79&PARK / BIG

15:00 - 8 November, 2018
79&PARK / BIG, © Laurian Ghinitoiu
© Laurian Ghinitoiu

© Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu + 34

  • Architects

  • Location

    Ladugårdsgärdet, Stockholm, Sweden
  • Partners in Charge

    Bjarke Ingels, Jakob Lange, Finn Nørkjær
  • Project Manager

    Per Bo Madsen
  • Project Leader

    Cat Huang
  • Area

    25000.0 m2
  • Project Year

    2018
  • Photographs

Norra Tornen / OMA | Reinier de Graaf

08:18 - 8 November, 2018
© Ossip van Duivenbode
© Ossip van Duivenbode

© Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu + 37

  • Architects

    OMA
  • Location

    Torsplan 8, 113 64 Stockholm, Sweden
  • Partner in Charge

    Reinier de Graaf
  • Client

    Oscar Properties
  • Program

    320 apartments, Retail
  • Area

    42299.0 m2
  • Project Year

    2018
  • Photographs

WeGrow / Bjarke Ingels Group

13:59 - 30 October, 2018
WeGrow / Bjarke Ingels Group, © Dave Burk
© Dave Burk

© Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Dave Burk + 12

  • Architects

  • Location

    421 8th Ave, New York, NY 10001, United States
  • Partners-in-Charge

    Bjarke Ingels, Daniel Sundlin, Beat Schenk
  • Project Designer

    Otilia Pupezeanu
  • Project Architect

    Jeremy Babel
  • Area

    930.0 m2
  • Project Year

    2018
  • Photographs

Spotlight: SANAA

15:00 - 29 October, 2018
Spotlight: SANAA, Grace Farms / SANAA. Image © Dean Kaufman
Grace Farms / SANAA. Image © Dean Kaufman

Founded in 1995 by architects Kazuyo Sejima (born 29 October 1956) and Ryue Nishizawa (born 7 February 1966), SANAA is world-renowned for its white, light buildings grounded in the architects’ Japanese cultural origins. Despite the white exteriors, their architecture is far from modernist; the constant incorporation of ambiguity and doubt in SANAA’s buildings is refreshing and playful, taking the reflective properties of glass and brightness of white to a new level.

Grace Farms / SANAA. Image © Dean Kaufman Louvre Lens / SANAA. Image © Julien Lanoo Glass Pavilion at the Toledo Museum of Art / SANAA. Image © Iwan Baan New Museum / SANAA. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu + 12

Best Small Chapel Architecture & Design

12:00 - 21 October, 2018
© Samuel Ludwig
© Samuel Ludwig

Cortesía de Nicolás Campodónico © Yao Li Cortesía de STUDIO associates © Davide Perbellini + 32

This week we’ve selected the best chapels previously published on our site. They reveal different ways of designing a small and sacred space. For inspiration on how to create these atmospheres, integrate different materials, and make proper use of light, we present 32 remarkable examples.

Life after Serpentine: Second Lives of Architecture's Famed Pavilions

09:30 - 18 October, 2018
Life after Serpentine: Second Lives of Architecture's Famed Pavilions, Serpentine Pavilion 2016 / Bjarke Ingels. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu
Serpentine Pavilion 2016 / Bjarke Ingels. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu

If the surest sign of summer in London is the appearance of a new pavilion in front of the Serpentine Gallery, then it’s perhaps fair to say that summer is over once the pavilion is taken down. The installations have gained prominence since its inaugural edition in 2000, acting as a kind of exclusive honor and indication of talent for those chosen to present; celebrated names from the past names include Zaha Hadid, Rem Koolhaas, and Olafur Eliasson.

Serpentine Pavilion 2015 / Selgas Cano. Image © Iwan Baan Serpentine Pavilion 2014 / Smiljan Radic. Image © Iwan Baan Serpentine Pavilion 2006 / Rem Koolhaas. Image © John Offenbach Serpentine Pavilion 2007 / Olafur Eliasson, Kjetil Thorsen, Cecil Balmond. Image © Luke Hayes + 20

AD Classics: New Museum / SANAA

22:00 - 14 October, 2018
AD Classics: New Museum / SANAA, © Laurian Ghinitoiu
© Laurian Ghinitoiu

This article was originally published on July 22, 2016. To read the stories behind other celebrated architecture projects, visit our AD Classics section.

The New Museum is the product of a daring vision to establish a radical, politicized center for contemporary art in New York City. With the aim of distinguishing itself from the city’s existing art institutions through a focus on emerging artists, the museum’s name embodies its pioneering spirit. Over the two decades following its foundation in 1977, it gained a strong reputation for its bold artistic program, and eventually outgrew its inconspicuous home in a SoHo loft. Keen to establish a visual presence and to reach a wider audience, in 2003 the Japanese architectural firm SANAA was commissioned to design a dedicated home for the museum. The resulting structure, a stack of rectilinear boxes which tower over the Bowery, would be the first and, thus far, the only purpose-built contemporary art museum in New York City.[1]

© Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu + 30

AD Classics: Master Plan for Chandigarh / Le Corbusier

16:30 - 6 October, 2018
AD Classics: Master Plan for Chandigarh / Le Corbusier, © Laurian Ghinitoiu
© Laurian Ghinitoiu

On August 15, 1947, on the eve of India’s independence from the United Kingdom, came a directive which would transform the subcontinent for the next six decades. In order to safeguard the country’s Muslim population from the Hindu majority, the departing colonial leaders set aside the northwestern and eastern portions of the territory for their use. Many of the approximately 100 million Muslims living scattered throughout India were given little more than 73 days to relocate to these territories, the modern-day nations of Pakistan and Bangladesh. As the borders for the new countries were drawn by Sir Cyril Radcliffe (an Englishman whose ignorance of Indian history and culture was perceived, by the colonial government, as an assurance of his impartiality), the state of Punjab was bisected between India and Pakistan, the latter of which retained ownership of the state capital of Lahore.[1] It was in the wake of this loss that Punjab would found a new state capital: one which would not only serve the logistical requirements of the state, but make an unequivocal statement to the entire world that a new India—modernized, prosperous, and independent—had arrived.

© Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu + 59

Spotlight: Le Corbusier

05:30 - 6 October, 2018
Spotlight: Le Corbusier, Notre Dame du Haut at Ronchamp. Image © <a href='www.flickr.com/photos/9160678@N06/2089042156'>Flickr user scarletgreen</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a>
Notre Dame du Haut at Ronchamp. Image © Flickr user scarletgreen licensed under CC BY 2.0

Born in the small Swiss city of La Chaux-de-Fonds, Charles-Édouard Jeanneret-Gris—better known by his pseudonym Le Corbusier (October 6, 1887 – August 27, 1965)—is widely regarded as the most important architect of the 20th century. As a gifted architect, provocative writer, divisive urban planner, talented painter, and unparalleled polemicist, Le Corbusier was able to influence some of the world’s most powerful figures, leaving an indelible mark on architecture that can be seen in almost any city worldwide.

Palace of the Assembly at Chandigarh. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/70608042@N00/1321525329'>Flickr user chiara_facchetti</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/'>CC BY-SA 2.0</a> Villa Savoye. Image © Flavio Bragaia Church at Firminy. Image © Richard Weil Swiss Pavilion. Image © Samuel Ludwig + 25

MINI LIVING Urban Cabin / Penda

12:20 - 3 October, 2018
MINI LIVING Urban Cabin / Penda, © Xia Zhi
© Xia Zhi

© Laurian Ghinitoiu © Xia Zhi © Xia Zhi © Laurian Ghinitoiu + 38

Spotlight: Bjarke Ingels

13:05 - 2 October, 2018
Spotlight: Bjarke Ingels, Lego House. Image Courtesy of LEGO Group
Lego House. Image Courtesy of LEGO Group

Danish architect Bjarke Ingels (born 2 October 1974) is often cited as one of the most inspirational architects of our time. At an age when many architects are just beginning to establish themselves in professional practice, Ingels has already won numerous competitions and achieved a level of critical acclaim (and fame) that is rare for new names in the industry. His work embodies a rare optimism that is simultaneously playful, practical, and immediately accessible.

Denmark Pavilion, Shanghai Expo 2010. Image © Iwan Baan VM Houses / BIG + JDS. Image Courtesy of BIG Danish National Maritime Museum. Image © Rasmus Hjortshõj 2016 Serpentine Pavilion. Image © Iwan Baan + 26

Ants House / Studio MIOLK

03:00 - 2 October, 2018
© Laurian Ghinitoiu
© Laurian Ghinitoiu

© Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu + 24

  • Architects

  • Location

    Iași, Romania
  • Lead Architects

    Adriana Gheorghiescu, Alexandra Berdan
  • Area

    170.0 m2
  • Project Year

    2017
  • Photographs