José Hevia

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From Machine Sentience to Designing New Environments: 6 Young Practices in Europe

New Generations is a European platform that analyses the most innovative emerging practices at the European level, providing a new space for the exchange of knowledge and confrontation, theory, and production. Since 2013, New Generations has involved more than 300 practices in a diverse program of cultural activities, such as festivals, exhibitions, open calls, video-interviews, workshops, and experimental formats.

Run Run Run Intervention / Andrés Jaque / Office for Political Innovation

© José Hevia© José Hevia© José Hevia© Miguel de Guzmán+ 25

  • Area Area of this architecture project Area:  239
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2019
  • Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project
    Manufacturers: Otis, Amaya de Toledo, Archipámpanos, Loreta Lion, Replaninnser 2000, +1

The Catalan Vault in Spanish Architecture: 15 Projects that Are Breathing New Life into An Old Technique

Casa JASB / Alessia Scardamaglia. Image © Nuria VilaCasa Tomás / LAB + Pepe Gascon. Image © José HeviaBeats / Nook architects + byn studio. Image © Nieve | Productora AudiovisualKaikaya / Masquespacio. Image © Luis Beltran+ 16

In some cases, a roof can become the shining centerpiece in a work of architecture. Catalan vault, also known as Valencian timbrel vault, became a fixture in Spanish architecture in the 19th century, popularized thanks to its low cost and ease of sourcing and assembly. With the ability to span over 30m per module, this technique is currently making a comeback, establishing itself as a go-to construction method in industrial architecture and can be seen in everything including workshops, factories, and warehouses.

The Magic Box Apartment / Raúl Sánchez Architects

© José Hevia© José Hevia© José Hevia© José Hevia+ 25

Viladecans, Spain

Palerm House / OHLAB

© José Hevia© José Hevia© José Hevia© José Hevia+ 21

Lloret de Vista Alegre, Spain
  • Architects: OHLAB
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area:  1937 ft²
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2019
  • Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project
    Manufacturers: AutoDesk, JUNG, ETHNICRAFT, Hisbalit, Santa & Cole, +9

Alfondac Community Warehouse and Guest Housing for Travelers / Aixopluc

© José Hevia© José Hevia© José Hevia© José Hevia+ 19

  • Architects: Aixopluc
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area:  55
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2020
  • Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project
    Manufacturers: Garnica Plywood, Huhuet Mallorca

Mas d'Enric Penitentiary / AiB estudi d'arquitectes + Estudi PSP Arquitectura

© José Hevia© José Hevia© José Hevia© José Hevia+ 25

El Catllar, Spain

AM Apartment / TwoBo arquitectura

© José Hevia© José Hevia© José Hevia© José Hevia+ 20

  • Architects: TwoBo arquitectura
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area:  1722 ft²
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2018
  • Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project
    Manufacturers: JUNG, Davide Groppi, Vola, Chef d'oeuvre, Marset Lighting, +1

Mirrors in Architecture: Possibilities of Reflected Space

Mirror Garden / ARCHSTUDIO. Image © Ning Wang
Mirror Garden / ARCHSTUDIO. Image © Ning Wang

KAP-House / ONG&ONG Pte Ltd. Image © Derek SwalwellSi estas paredes hablasen / Serrano + Baquero Arquitectos. Image © Fernando AldaPH José Mármol / Estudio Yama. Image © Javier Agustin RojasThe Mirror Window / Kosaku Matsumoto. Image © Nobutada Omote+ 39

Humans have used mirrors since as early as 600 BCE, employing highly polished obsidian as a basic reflective surface. Over time, people began to use small pieces of gold, silver, and aluminum in a similar manner, both for their reflective properties and for decoration. By the 1st century CE, people had started using glass to make mirrors, but it was only during the European Renaissance that Venetian manufacturers began making mirrors by applying metallic backings to glass sheets, remaining the most common general method of mirror manufacturing today. Since then, mirrors have continued to play both a decorative and functional role in architecture, serving a clean, modern aesthetic despite its ancient origins. Below, we investigate how mirrors are made, provide a brief history of mirrors in architecture, and offer several tips for architects looking to use mirrors in their designs.

Access Pavilion at the Lycée Français in Barcelona / COMA Arquitectura

© Jose Hevia© Jose Hevia© Jose Hevia© Jose Hevia+ 23

Barcelona, Spain
  • Architects: COMA Arquitectura
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area:  1545
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2018
  • Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project
    Manufacturers: K-Line France, Lamp Lighting, Arquima, Breinco, Ferrimax, +1

Startup Hub in 22@ / Elastiko

© José Hevia© José Hevia© José Hevia© José Hevia+ 31

  • Architects: Elastiko
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area:  845
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2019
  • Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project
    Manufacturers: AutoDesk, Lumik, Santa & Cole, Stua, VitrA, +2

6 Houses in Cabrera de Mar / Twobo arquitectura + Luis Twose

© José Hevia© José Hevia© José Hevia© José Hevia+ 22

Cabrera de Mar, Spain

Centre for Comparative Medicine and Bio-Image / Calderon-Folch Studio + Sarsanedas Arquitectura + COMA Arquitectura + Mario Nahra

© José Hevia© José Hevia© José Hevia© José Hevia+ 43

Badalona, Spain

Architecture post COVID-19: the Profession, the Firms, and the Individuals

As the world is slowly reopening, easing lockdown measures, everyone is adapting to new realities. Imposing drastic adjustments to our lives, the coronavirus has introduced a new “normal”, changing our perceptions and altering our priorities. Driven towards questioning and evaluating our environment, we are constantly reacting and anticipating a relatively unknown future.

A casual conversation between two editors at ArchDaily generated this collaborative piece that seeks to investigate the current trends, predict the future, and offer insights to everyone/everything related to the architectural field. Tackling the evolution of the profession, the firms, and the individuals, especially young adults and students, this article, produced by Christele Harrouk and Eric Baldwin, aims to reveal what is happening in the architecture scene.

Perkins and Will Creates Guideline for a Safe Return to the Office during COVID-19

Perkins and Will have generated a set of strategies, grounded in public health guidance, to help offices resume their work during COVID-19. Focusing on the transition phase, the guideline helps employers draw a road map for safe return.

Agora / unparelld’arquitectes

© José Hevia© José Hevia© José Hevia© José Hevia+ 17

  • Area Area of this architecture project Area:  2083
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2017
  • Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project
    Manufacturers: Europerfil, Breinco

Butterfly Effect: 4 Principles for Fighting Global Issues Through Architecture

In a predominately urban world that constantly has to deal with complex problems such as waste generation, water scarcity, natural disasters, air pollution, and even the spread of disease, it is impossible to ignore the impact of human activity on the environment. Climate change is one of the greatest challenges of our time and it is urgent that we find ways to slow down the process, at the very least. Toward this end, our production, consumption, and construction habits will have to change, or climate change and environmental degradation will continue to diminish the quality and duration of our lives and that of future generations.

Although they seem intangible and distant, these various energy inefficiencies and waste issues are much closer than we can imagine, present in the buildings we use on a daily basis. As architects, this problem is further amplified as we deal daily with design decisions and material specifications. In other words, our decisions really do have a global impact. How can we use design to create a healthier future for our world?