Javier Agustín Rojas

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Small-Scale Horizontal Properties in Buenos Aires: Building Up Rather than Out

PH-Agronomía / FRAM arquitectos + JES. Image PH Lavalleja / CCPM Arquitectos. Image PH Scalabrini Ortiz / Kohan Ratto Arquitectos. Image PH Thames / Alonso&Crippa. Image + 21

While Buenos Aires' architecture is known for its heterogenous and constantly-changing nature, within the city's low density residential sectors, it's possible to detect forms and patterns that have remained constant under the city's many transformations. One of these is the HP, or Horizontal Property, a legal concept that allows for multiple constructions on one lot, resulting in a handful of low-rise structures congregated together in a high-density layout.

Bamba House / CCPM Arquitectos

© Javier Agustín Rojas© Javier Agustín Rojas© Javier Agustín Rojas© Javier Agustín Rojas+ 25

  • Architects: CCPM Arquitectos
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area:  180
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2019
  • Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project
    Manufacturers: AutoDesk, Alba, Carpeal, Nos Arquitectos, Oficios Asociados, +2

PH Scalabrini Ortiz House / Kohan Ratto Arquitectos

© Javier Agustín Rojas© Javier Agustín Rojas© Javier Agustín Rojas© Javier Agustín Rojas+ 34

Palermo, Argentina

Huerta Coworking Microcentro / FLORA

© Javier Agustín Rojas© Javier Agustín Rojas© Javier Agustín Rojas© Javier Agustín Rojas+ 27

Buenos Aires, Argentina
  • Architects: FLORA
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area:  1800
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2020
  • Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project
    Manufacturers: Martin Alerce, VIDRIERIA PATERNAL

Mirrors in Architecture: Possibilities of Reflected Space

Mirror Garden / ARCHSTUDIO. Image © Ning Wang
Mirror Garden / ARCHSTUDIO. Image © Ning Wang

KAP-House / ONG&ONG Pte Ltd. Image © Derek SwalwellSi estas paredes hablasen / Serrano + Baquero Arquitectos. Image © Fernando AldaPH José Mármol / Estudio Yama. Image © Javier Agustin RojasThe Mirror Window / Kosaku Matsumoto. Image © Nobutada Omote+ 39

Humans have used mirrors since as early as 600 BCE, employing highly polished obsidian as a basic reflective surface. Over time, people began to use small pieces of gold, silver, and aluminum in a similar manner, both for their reflective properties and for decoration. By the 1st century CE, people had started using glass to make mirrors, but it was only during the European Renaissance that Venetian manufacturers began making mirrors by applying metallic backings to glass sheets, remaining the most common general method of mirror manufacturing today. Since then, mirrors have continued to play both a decorative and functional role in architecture, serving a clean, modern aesthetic despite its ancient origins. Below, we investigate how mirrors are made, provide a brief history of mirrors in architecture, and offer several tips for architects looking to use mirrors in their designs.

Inspiring Architectural Projects for Bicycles

Nowadays bicycles are not only used for sports or as a recreational activity, as more and more people are choosing bicycles as their main means of transportation.

Architecture plays a fundamental role in promoting the use of bicycles, as a properly equipped city with safe bicycle lanes, plentiful bicycle parking spots, and open areas to ride freely will encourage people to use their cars much less.

© Russ Flatt© Sergey Kuznetsov© Iwan Baan© Jesús Granada+ 32

Montegrande Commercial Center / Sava Arquitectos

© Javier Agustín Rojas© Javier Agustín Rojas© Javier Agustín Rojas© Javier Agustín Rojas+ 24

  • Architects: Sava Arquitectos
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area:  3229 ft²
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2018

Green Balconies: Gardens with Altitude

25 Green / Luciano Pia. Image  Lorena Building / Lucia Manzano Arquitetura + Paisagismo. Image  PRV 843 Building / JL arquitectos. Image Bosco Verticale / Stefano Boeri Architetti. Image + 22

With the COVID-19 pandemic sweeping through the world's urban centers, governments worldwide are urging citizens to hunker down at home in a bid to quell the virus' spread. For apartment dwellers under quarantine, balconies have become the new platforms for entertainment and social interaction, making now an opportune moment in rethinking how we design and build these outdoor urban spaces.

Juramento Home Office / Landolfo & Asoc + Marcos Asa

© Javier Agustin Rojas© Javier Agustin Rojas© Javier Agustin Rojas© Javier Agustin Rojas+ 25

  • Area Area of this architecture project Area:  100
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2019
  • Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project
    Manufacturers: AutoDesk, 3D MAX STUDIO, Molinos Tarquini, ferrum
  • Lead Architects:Hernan Landolf, Marcos Asa
  • Collaborators:Franco Gilardi
  • City:Buenos Aires
  • Country:Argentina
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Estomba House / Calfat-Mazzocchi

© Javier Agustin Rojas© Javier Agustin Rojas© Javier Agustin Rojas© Javier Agustin Rojas+ 17

Belgrano, Argentina
  • Architects: Calfat-Mazzocchi
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area:  120
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2018

Lerma Work Spaces / nu

© Javier Agustín Rojas© Javier Agustín Rojas© Javier Agustín Rojas© Javier Agustín Rojas+ 25

  • Architects: nu
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area:  150
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2020
  • Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project
    Manufacturers: Sherwin-Williams, Blangino, FV, Insuma Sur, JOHNSON, +2

Commodore Apartment Building / Planta

© Javier Agustín Rojas
© Javier Agustín Rojas

© Javier Agustín Rojas© Javier Agustín Rojas© Javier Agustín Rojas© Javier Agustín Rojas+ 24

  • Architects: Planta
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area:  1000
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2019

Falafel Booth / Juan Campanini Josefina Sposito

© Javier Agustín Rojas© Javier Agustín Rojas© Javier Agustín Rojas© Javier Agustín Rojas+ 15

Recoleta, Argentina
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area:  40
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2018
  • Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project
    Manufacturers: Hydro, Shulman

House L224 / Felipe Gonzalez Arzac

© Javier Agustín Rojas© Javier Agustín Rojas© Javier Agustín Rojas© Javier Agustín Rojas+ 17

City Bell, Argentina
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area:  220
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2017

Caseros Warehouse / moarqs

© Albano Garcia© Albano Garcia© Javier Agustin Rojas© Javier Agustin Rojas+ 29

  • Architects: moarqs
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area:  470
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2018

Tacuari House / moarqs

© Albano Garcia© Javier Agustin Rojas© Javier Agustin Rojas© Javier Agustin Rojas+ 45

Barracas, Argentina
  • Architects: moarqs
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area:  383
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2018

40 Impressive Details Using Concrete

Due to its ability to mold and create different shapes, concrete is one of architecture's most popular materials. While one of its most common uses is as a humble foundation, its plasticity means that it is also used in almost all types of construction, from housing to museums, presenting a variety of details of work that deserves special attention.

Check out this collection of 40 projects that highlight the use of concrete. Impressive! 

Spotlight: Clorindo Testa

Bank of London and South America. Image © Federico Cairoli
Bank of London and South America. Image © Federico Cairoli

Relatively unknown outside his home country, Clorindo Testa (December 10, 1923 – April 11, 2013) was one of Argentina’s most important 20th-century architects. Consistently defying categorization, Testa had a hand in two of Buenos Aires’ most iconic buildings, the Bank of London and South America, and the National Library, as well as many others throughout his long career. Characteristically enigmatic, Testa would only ever acknowledge Le Corbusier as an influence, saying, “I never paid attention to other architects.” As a former colleague Juan Fontana described, Testa spoke the language of brutalism with an Argentine accent.