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Fernando Schapochnik

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Structural Details As Seen in Courtyards

House Between Pines / XPIRAL. Image Holmberg House / Estudio Borrachia. Image Tacuari House / moarqs. Image Patio House / Ezequiel Spinelli + Facundo S. López. Image + 21

The distribution of natural light, improved ventilation, and the propensity to connect  living spaces with the outdoors while maintaining the privacy of the inhabitants have made courtyards a go-to in architectural design around the world over the centuries.

Courtyards are characterized as outdoor or semi-outdoor spaces that are enclosed within the walls of a house or building.

Glass Bricks in Argentine Houses: Achieving Natural Light and Privacy with Translucent Blocks

House Luisina / Reimers Risso Arquitectura. Image © Fernando SchapochnikHouse with Bricks / Martín Aloras. Image © Walter SalcedoAYYA House / Estudio Galera. Image © Diego MedinaHouse 47 / Reimers Risso Arquitectura. Image © Fernando Schapochnik+ 10

When designing a space, architects across the board tout the importance, and even necessity, of incorporating natural light into interiors. This means taking measures to control the quantity of light being let in and its distribution throughout the space.

In the case of residential spaces, where privacy plays a larger role than in public spaces like offices, restaurants, and stores, opaque materials like screens, tinted glass, and other barriers are the go-tos for providing protection and privacy from the outside; however, the privacy that these methods provide often comes at the cost of the space's natural lighting, forcing designers to seek alternative materials that allow for both light and privacy.

Soler Textiles Office / Ana Smud

© Fernando Schapochnik© Fernando Schapochnik© Fernando Schapochnik© Fernando Schapochnik+ 35

  • Architects: Ana Smud
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area:  1210
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2019
  • Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project
    Manufacturers: Listone Giordano, Alsa carpinterias, Pimux

Split-Level Argentine Houses: Using Height to Separate Spaces

Pedroso House / BAK Arquitectos. Image © Gustavo Sosa PinillaIA House / alarciaferrer arquitectos. Image © Emilia Sierra Guzman© Emilia Sierra GuzmanCJP House / ONA - Oficina Nómada de Arquitectura. Image © Arq. Luis Abba+ 22

In architecture, split-level houses are typically in response to a plot's uneven or sloping topography. In the case of the houses featured here, their split level interiors are a matter of function, allowing spaces to be virtually separated by dividing them between raised and semi-subterranean floor layouts. For example, adjoining two spaces with a 50cm step up or drop off allows for separation without the use of walls or other physical barriers. 

Viisa House / Francisco Farias Arquitecto y Asociados

© Fernando Schapochnik© Fernando Schapochnik© Fernando Schapochnik© Fernando Schapochnik+ 25

  • Area Area of this architecture project Area:  165
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2020
  • Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project
    Manufacturers: ACINDAR, Peirano, aceroperfil

Housing Av. Lincoln / bakro

© Fernando Schapochnik© Fernando Schapochnik© Fernando Schapochnik© Fernando Schapochnik+ 28

Villa Devoto, Argentina
  • Architects: bakro
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area:  331
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2020
  • Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project
    Manufacturers: AutoDesk, Abercom

Dique Luján House / FRAM arquitectos

© Fernando Schapochnik© Fernando Schapochnik© Fernando Schapochnik© Fernando Schapochnik+ 35

Zapiola House / Estudio Florida

© Fernando Schapochnik© Fernando Schapochnik© Fernando Schapochnik© Fernando Schapochnik+ 24

  • Architects: Estudio Florida
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area:  170
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2020
  • Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project
    Manufacturers: AutoDesk, Acuarela, Itati Marmolería, Nomen

Conde Housing – Entreverdes Colegiales / Estudio Abramzon + Estudio ZZarq

© Fernando Schapochnik© Fernando Schapochnik© Fernando Schapochnik© Fernando Schapochnik+ 36

Colegiales, Argentina

Small-Scale Horizontal Properties in Buenos Aires: Building Up Rather than Out

PH-Agronomía / FRAM arquitectos + JES. Image PH Lavalleja / CCPM Arquitectos. Image PH Scalabrini Ortiz / Kohan Ratto Arquitectos. Image PH Thames / Alonso&Crippa. Image + 21

While Buenos Aires' architecture is known for its heterogenous and constantly-changing nature, within the city's low density residential sectors, it's possible to detect forms and patterns that have remained constant under the city's many transformations. One of these is the HP, or Horizontal Property, a legal concept that allows for multiple constructions on one lot, resulting in a handful of low-rise structures congregated together in a high-density layout.

Virginia House / Reimers Risso Arquitectura

© Fernando Schapochnik© Fernando Schapochnik© Fernando Schapochnik© Fernando Schapochnik+ 21

Villa Elisa, Argentina

House 47 / Reimers Risso Arquitectura

© Fernando Schapochnik© Fernando Schapochnik© Fernando Schapochnik© Fernando Schapochnik+ 21

La Plata, Argentina

Hinges and Slides: Mobile Mechanisms to Take Advantage of Tiny Spaces

At the 2014 Venice Biennale, celebrated architect and curator Rem Koolhaas chose an unusual curatorial theme. Rather than exploring the major issues that plague modern society or their manifestations in the profession of architecture, the event's theme, "Fundamentals," and its main exhibition, "Elements of Architecture," examined in detail the bare fundamentals of buildings, simple elements used by everyday architects for everyday designs. According to Koolhaas, “Architecture is a profession trained to put things together, not to dismantle them. Only by looking at the elements of architecture under a microscope can we recognize cultural preferences, technological advances, changes triggered by the intensification of global exchange, climatic adaptations, local norms and, somewhere in the mix, the architect's ideas that constitute the practice of architecture today.”

House Luisina / Reimers Risso Arquitectura

© Fernando Schapochnik© Fernando Schapochnik© Fernando Schapochnik© Luisina Anderson+ 23

Villa Elvira, Argentina