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Croatian Architecture

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A Public Park in a Former Quarry in Australia and A Garden Bridge in China: 10 Unbuilt Public Spaces and Buildings Submitted to Archdaily

This week's curated selection of Best Unbuilt Architecture highlights public spaces and buildings submitted by the ArchDaily Community. From bridges to squares, from parks to markets and train stations, this article explores the various kinds of public infrastructure that support the urban fabric, showcasing distinct approaches worldwide.

The Croatian Pavilion for the 2021 Venice Biennale Imagines New Spaces of Togetherness

The Croatian Pavilion for the 17th Venice Architecture Biennale explores how repurposing architectural elements reshapes the individual’s relationship with space and constructs a new place of encounter. Titled Togetherness / Togetherless, the project curated by Idis Turato is a spatial composition of ready-made elements, which are given new meanings and functions, developing a new perspective on architectural space and enabling a temporary community.

3LHD Architects Designs New Campus for Croatian Car Manufacturer Rimac

Designed by 3LHD Architects, the new campus for the Croatian electric hypercar manufacturer Rimac brings together a wide array of programs and spaces, from production plant and offices to kindergarten, dormitory and even a sheep meadow. Located in the outskirts of Zagreb, within a natural landscape, the Rimac Campus is organized around two main volumes that follow the site’s natural topography, with several accompanying facilities tucked underneath a green roof that stretches out, meeting the surrounding landscape.

Building History: Croatia's Secluded Homes Rethinking Tradition

Croatia has long been a crossroads of culture. Located along the Adriatic Sea, it borders five countries and has some of the richest biodiversity in Europe. The built environment reflects influences from Central Europe and the Mediterranean, as well as both the Roman and Byzantine Empires. Today, a series of new housing projects are reinterpreting the country's past as architects and designers look to reimagine what the future holds.

Sheltered Villas in Greece and Floating Terraces in India: 10 Unbuilt Projects Submitted by our Readers

Houses and Villas are the most researched topics on ArchDaily. Putting together a curated selection of conceptual interventions, this week’s Best Unbuilt Architecture focuses on the residential sector. From all over the world, this group presents proposals submitted by our readers.

7 Winning Unbuilt Projects Submitted by our Readers

Every day we receive hundreds of submission forms from our readers, who want to share their work on our platform. Known for our interest in young talent, we encourage people to communicate their ideas, projects, and views on architecture. In order to share more of our readers’ work, we have rounded up in this first article the winning competition entries from the unbuilt section.

SUPERSPACE Proposes Timber Observation Tower and Vertical Forest for Zagreb

Istanbul-based SUPERSPACE has proposed a new concept for a pocketed timber observation tower in Zagreb, Croatia. Designed to be an iconic gate, the project would be sited between the old and new city. Called Ascension, the project takes inspiration from Zagreb's historical and natural iconic landmarks. Facing the south bank of River Sava, the tower's form is derived from the character of the old town's existing towers integrated with a new vertical forest.

Cloud Pergola: The Croatian Pavilion at the 2018 Venice Biennale

As part of our 2018 Venice Architecture Biennale coverage, we present the completed Croatian Pavilion. Below, the curatorial team describes the exhibition in their own words.

7 Game of Thrones Locations You Can Visit in Real Life

Is your life lacking in dragons? Do you long for the excitement and danger of a constant, treacherous struggle for governing power? If you find yourself simply biding your time waiting for new seasons of Game of Thrones to air (or for George R.R. Martin to finally write another book) one option is to spend some time traveling to the real-life locations used in the filming of the show! From Iceland to Morocco, the show’s creators have traveled all over the world to bring the mythical world Martin describes in his novels to life on screen. While much of the filming is done in a studio, and of course there’s plenty of CGI involved, many of the landscapes and buildings seen throughout the show’s 6 seasons are real places open to the public. We can’t promise you dragons or control of the Iron Throne, but what you will get are some spectacular sights that might just make you feel like a real Westerosi.

Hear This Croatian Seawall Sing as the Wind and Waves Lap the Shore

Following the Second World War, the Croatian city of Zadar underwent a large, rapid reconstructive transformation. The city's seafront became nothing more than a concrete wall until 2005, when architect Nikola Bašić proposed to redesign parts of the seawall to interact with the ocean waves. Concealed beneath marble blocks, the 'Sea Organ' (morske orgulje in Croatian) is comprised of a network of polyethylene tubes and resonating cavities which sing as the waves and wind lap the shore. With thirty five individual pipes spanning a total length of seventy metres, it is the largest aerophone in the world. According to reports, the sound is specifically directed out to sea and is impossible to hear from within the city of Zadar itself. In 2006, the intervention was jointly awarded the European Prize for Urban Space.