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New York City

New York City Pop-up Celebrates 40 Years of Zaha Hadid's Design Innovations

05:00 - 12 November, 2018
New York City Pop-up Celebrates 40 Years of Zaha Hadid's Design Innovations, Courtesy of Zaha Hadid Architects
Courtesy of Zaha Hadid Architects

From city master plans to pocket-sized products, Zaha Hadid Architects (ZHA) have explored architectural formalism through innovative digital design methods. In 2006, the collaboration with furniture-makers and fashion houses led to the creation of Zaha Hadid Design that served both as an iterative process for and a resultant of ongoing architectural design.

A pop-up exhibition, located suitably on the ground floor of ZHA's renowned condominium along the High Line in New York City, features a scale model of the building itself on display. To honor and present the work produced by the firm in the last four decades, the Zaha Hadid Gallery showcases a series of projects in a wide range of mediums including the six 'Silver Models' that represent eight of the firm's key works.

© Luke Hayes Courtesy of Zaha Hadid Architects Courtesy of Slamp © Kris Tamburello + 22

Denise Scott Brown's Photography from the 1950s and 60s Unveiled in New York and London Galleries

10:00 - 6 November, 2018
Denise Scott Brown's Photography from the 1950s and 60s Unveiled in New York and London Galleries, Courtesy of carriage trade, photo: Nicholas Knight.
Courtesy of carriage trade, photo: Nicholas Knight.

An exhibition has opened at New York’s Carriage Trade Gallery celebrating the photography of Denise Scott Brown, highlighting the significance of pop art in the American vernacular. The project was initiated by Scott Brown, and first exhibited in Venice in 2016, with the latest events in London and New York initiated by PLANE-SITE.

The exhibition, titled “Photographs 1956-1966” is co-curated by Andres Ramirez, with 10 photographs selected, curated, and featured for limited sale. As well as being on display at the Carriage Trade Gallery, a concurrent exhibition is taking place in the Window Galleries at Central Saint Martins, University of the Arts, London.

Courtesy of carriage trade, photo: Nicholas Knight. Courtesy of carriage trade, photo: Nicholas Knight. Courtesy of carriage trade, photo: Nicholas Knight. Courtesy of carriage trade, photo: Nicholas Knight. + 24

Foster + Partners Chosen to Design JP Morgan Chase Headquarters in New York City

09:00 - 6 November, 2018
Foster + Partners Chosen to Design JP Morgan Chase Headquarters in New York City, The existing headquarters of JP Morgan Chase. Image © Shutterstock
The existing headquarters of JP Morgan Chase. Image © Shutterstock

Foster + Partners has been chosen to design the new HQ for JP Morgan Chase on Park Avenue, New York City. The new global headquarters, situated on 270 Park Avenue, follows on from previous corporate headquarters designed by the firm, including the 2018 Stirling Prize-winning Bloomberg HQ, and the Apple Campus 2 in California.

The new scheme will replace the existing Manhattan premises of the US investment bank and is expected to total 2.5 million square feet. The headquarters will house around 15,000 employees across 70 levels, replacing the original 52-story scheme designed by Skidmore Owings and Merrill in the 1960s.

AD Classics: Radio City Music Hall / Edward Durell Stone & Donald Deskey

22:00 - 26 October, 2018
AD Classics: Radio City Music Hall / Edward Durell Stone & Donald Deskey, Courtesy of Flickr user Erik Drost
Courtesy of Flickr user Erik Drost

This article was originally published on July 29, 2016. To read the stories behind other celebrated architecture projects, visit our AD Classics section.

Upon opening its doors for the first time on a rainy winter’s night in 1932, the Radio City Music Hall in Manhattan was proclaimed so extraordinarily beautiful as to need no performers at all. The first built component of the massive Rockefeller Center, the Music Hall has been the world’s largest indoor theater for over eighty years. With its elegant Art Deco interiors and complex stage machinery, the theater defied tradition to set a new standard for modern entertainment venues that remains to this day.

Courtesy of Flickr user Ed Schipul Courtesy of Flickr user Roger Courtesy of Flickr user Steve Huang Courtesy of Flickr user Mattia Panciroli + 10

Adjaye’s 130 William Street Tower Begins Façade Installation in Manhattan

13:00 - 26 October, 2018
Adjaye’s 130 William Street Tower Begins Façade Installation in Manhattan, 130 William Street. Image © Andrew Campbell Nelson
130 William Street. Image © Andrew Campbell Nelson

Adjaye Associates130 William Street residential tower in Lower Manhattan has begun installation of the building facade. As New York YIMBY reports, last week the hand-cast concrete arches started getting installed. Made to recall New York City’s historic fabric from the 19th and early 20th centuries, the facade was designed around an eclectic material and color palette. Once finished, the tower will include 244 new luxury condominiums in the Financial District.

130 William Street. Image © Andrew Campbell Nelson 130 William Street. Image © Andrew Campbell Nelson 130 William Street. Image © Andrew Campbell Nelson 130 William Street. Image © Andrew Campbell Nelson + 5

A Pocket Guide to New York's Art Deco Skyline

04:00 - 25 October, 2018
Empire State Building / Shreve, Lamb & Harmon
Empire State Building / Shreve, Lamb & Harmon

In a permanent state of architectural transience, New York City continues to be adorned with new skyscrapers with every passing day. Historically fueled by financial prosperity coupled with the demand for commercial space, the only way to continue to build was up. Blue Crow Media’s latest map, “Art Deco New York Map” showcases over sixty buildings from the era, celebrating the eclectic nature of Art Deco architecture that is so deeply inherent to the identity of the city.

Radio City Music Hall / Edward Durell Stone and Donald Deskey © Jason Woods / Blue Crow Media New School for Social Research Auditorium / Joseph Urban Brooklyn Public Library / Alfred Morton Githens and Francis Keally + 9

Modernist Icon Paul Rudolph's Unbuilt LOMEX Completed in New Renderings

07:40 - 23 October, 2018
Modernist Icon Paul Rudolph's Unbuilt LOMEX Completed in New Renderings, Plaza by the Williamsburg bridge. Image Courtesy of Lasse Lyhne-Hansen
Plaza by the Williamsburg bridge. Image Courtesy of Lasse Lyhne-Hansen

Paul Rudolph, despite vaulting to international success in the early 1940s and 50s for his Brutalist structures, saw an abrupt end to the popularity of his signature style as postmodernism gained prominence. As tastes shifted to different fare, so too did Rudolph's approach - leaving a number of  his unbuilt proposals to gather dust. 

No longer. 

Middle path through the lowrises. Image Courtesy of Lasse Lyhne-Hansen Paul Rudolph's original vision of LOMEX. Image Paul Rudolph's original vision of LOMEX. Image View from terrace in the high-rises. Image Courtesy of Lasse Lyhne-Hansen + 14

AD Classics: TWA Flight Center / Eero Saarinen

22:00 - 21 October, 2018
AD Classics: TWA Flight Center / Eero Saarinen, © Cameron Blaylock
© Cameron Blaylock

This article was originally published on June 16, 2016. To read the stories behind other celebrated architecture projects, visit our AD Classics section.

Built in the early days of airline travel, the TWA Terminal is a concrete symbol of the rapid technological transformations which were fueled by the outset of the Second World War. Eero Saarinen sought to capture the sensation of flight in all aspects of the building, from a fluid and open interior, to the wing-like concrete shell of the roof. At TWA’s behest, Saarinen designed more than a functional terminal; he designed a monument to the airline and to aviation itself.

This AD Classic features a series of exclusive images by Cameron Blaylock, photographed in May 2016. Blaylock used a Contax camera and Zeiss lenses with Rollei black and white film to reflect camera technology of the 1960s.

© Cameron Blaylock © Cameron Blaylock © Cameron Blaylock © Cameron Blaylock + 26

AD Classics: Empire State Building / Shreve, Lamb and Harmon

22:00 - 19 October, 2018
AD Classics: Empire State Building / Shreve, Lamb and Harmon, (2005). Image © Wikimedia user robertpaulyoung (licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0)
(2005). Image © Wikimedia user robertpaulyoung (licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0)

This article was originally published on December 5, 2016. To read the stories behind other celebrated architecture projects, visit our AD Classics section.

Even in Manhattan—a sea of skyscrapers—the Empire State Building towers over its neighbours. Since its completion in 1931 it has been one of the most iconic architectural landmarks in the United States, standing as the tallest structure in the world until the Twin Towers of the World Trade Center were constructed in Downtown Manhattan four decades later. Its construction in the early years of the Great Depression, employing thousands of workers and requiring vast material resources, was driven by more than commercial interest: the Empire State Building was to be a monument to the audacity of the United States of America, “a land which reached for the sky with its feet on the ground.”[1]

Image via Wikimedia (Public Domain). ImageLaying of the tower's foundations The pinnacle of the tower. Image © Wikimedia user David Corby (licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0) Image via Wikimedia (Public Domain). ImageUnder construction Image via Wikimedia (Public Domain). ImageUnder construction + 6

What New York's Central Park Could Have Looked Like

07:45 - 19 October, 2018
What New York's Central Park Could Have Looked Like, Courtesy of NeoMam Studios for Budget Direct
Courtesy of NeoMam Studios for Budget Direct

New York’s iconic Central Park was designed in 1858 by F.L Olmsted and C. Vaux, having been chosen in a competition against 32 other entries. The competition called for the design of a park including a parade ground, fountain, watchtower, skating arena, four cross streets, and room for an exhibition hall.

Of the 32 alternative entries, only one survives to this day. The sole survivor was drawn up park engineer John J. Rink. To give an indication as to how Rink’s plan would have aged in the Big Apple, NeoMam Studios and Budget Direct have published a set of visualizations derived from the design. Find out below what one of the world’s most iconic green spaces could have looked like if a 160-year-old decision had been different.

Courtesy of NeoMam Studios for Budget Direct Courtesy of NeoMam Studios for Budget Direct Courtesy of NeoMam Studios for Budget Direct Courtesy of NeoMam Studios for Budget Direct + 6

The Tallest Residential Building in the World is coming to New York City

02:30 - 18 October, 2018
The Tallest Residential Building in the World is coming to New York City, Central Park Tower. Image Courtesy of ASGG & Wordsearch
Central Park Tower. Image Courtesy of ASGG & Wordsearch

The design for the tallest residential building in the world has been unveiled, situated in New York City. “Central Park Tower” by Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill architecture will stand at 1,550 feet (472 meters). The firm’s Jeddah tower in Saudi Arabia is also currently under construction, on track to be the world’s tallest tower.

Reddymade Wins the Times Square Valentine Heart Design Competition of 2019

09:00 - 17 October, 2018
Reddymade Wins the Times Square Valentine Heart Design Competition of 2019, Courtesy of Reddymade
Courtesy of Reddymade

Reddymade has been unveiled as the winner of the Valentine Heart Design Competition installation in Times Square, New York. The scheme is inspired by the “history of the iconic New York urban space and its presence in the eyes of the world as a byword for a thriving intersection of people, place, and culture.”

The winning team explored the tectonic possibilities of intersecting shapes, investigating what happens with two different planes intersect. The resulting sculpture created two converging planes merging together to create an iconic ‘X’ which, when intersected by a cylindrical volume, creates a heart-shaped space. 

AD Classics: New Museum / SANAA

22:00 - 14 October, 2018
AD Classics: New Museum / SANAA, © Laurian Ghinitoiu
© Laurian Ghinitoiu

This article was originally published on July 22, 2016. To read the stories behind other celebrated architecture projects, visit our AD Classics section.

The New Museum is the product of a daring vision to establish a radical, politicized center for contemporary art in New York City. With the aim of distinguishing itself from the city’s existing art institutions through a focus on emerging artists, the museum’s name embodies its pioneering spirit. Over the two decades following its foundation in 1977, it gained a strong reputation for its bold artistic program, and eventually outgrew its inconspicuous home in a SoHo loft. Keen to establish a visual presence and to reach a wider audience, in 2003 the Japanese architectural firm SANAA was commissioned to design a dedicated home for the museum. The resulting structure, a stack of rectilinear boxes which tower over the Bowery, would be the first and, thus far, the only purpose-built contemporary art museum in New York City.[1]

© Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu + 30

Storefront for Art and Architecture Appoints José Esparza Chong Cuy as Executive Director

14:00 - 7 October, 2018
Storefront for Art and Architecture Appoints José Esparza Chong Cuy as Executive Director, Courtesy of Storefront for Art and Architecture
Courtesy of Storefront for Art and Architecture

José Esparza Chong Cuy has been appointed as the new Executive Director and Chief Curator at Storefront for Art and Architecture. Following the departure of former director Eva Franch i Gilabert to London as the new Director of the Architectural Association, the extensive international search to fill her shoes began. An architect, curator, and writer, originally from Mexico, Esparza Chong Cuy was named and will assume the position starting November 1st.

Storefront, a non-profit organization based in New York City, engages in the advancement of design and architecture with interdisciplinary dialogue through exhibitions and projects that aim to transcend geographic and ideological boundaries. Charles Renfro, President of Storefront's Board of Directors, remarks, "We are thrilled to welcome José to the helm of Storefront, the very institution where he began his curatorial career over a decade ago."

COOKFOX Reimagines Former High Line Freight Terminal as Workplace of the Future

13:00 - 3 October, 2018
COOKFOX Reimagines Former High Line Freight Terminal as Workplace of the Future, St. John’s Terminal. Image Courtesy of COOKFOX Architects
St. John’s Terminal. Image Courtesy of COOKFOX Architects

COOKFOX Architects and Oxford Properties have reimagined New York's St. John’s Terminal as a workplace of the future. The 1.3 million square foot proposal aims to connect the Hudson Square neighborhood to the waterfront at the end of The High Line. Combining outdoor space and greenery with 100,000 square-foot floor plates, the project reinterprets the industrial past of the former freight terminal. The project was created to shape how businesses innovate and create between Lower Manhattan and the waterfront.

St. John’s Terminal. Image Courtesy of COOKFOX Architects St. John’s Terminal. Image Courtesy of COOKFOX Architects St. John’s Terminal. Image Courtesy of COOKFOX Architects St. John’s Terminal. Image Courtesy of COOKFOX Architects + 4

Using Architecture to Create a New Civic Movement: SHoP's Chris Sharples Speaks

09:30 - 3 October, 2018
Using Architecture to Create a New Civic Movement: SHoP's Chris Sharples Speaks, Courtesy of SHoP Architects
Courtesy of SHoP Architects

This article was originally published by Autodesk's Redshift publication as "SHoP's Chris Sharples on Urban Architecture, Digital Fabrication, and the Public Realm."

Twin brothers Chris and Bill Sharples are two of the founding partners of SHoP Architects, a New York-based firm established 20 years ago to bring together diverse expertise in designing buildings and environments that improve the quality of public life.

The firm’s style is difficult to define, but a connective thread throughout SHoP’s portfolio is a design philosophy rooted in constraints. From digital models to next-generation fabrication and delivery techniques, technology is at the center of the firm’s movement toward an iterative approach that, as Chris Sharples says, “is beginning to blur the line between architecture and manufacturing.”

Courtesy of SHoP Architects © SHoP Architects and West8 © Bruce Damonte Courtesy of SHoP Architects + 8

SHoP Architects' 111 West 57th Rises to Supertall Height as Terracotta Facade Pieces Go Missing

14:00 - 10 September, 2018
SHoP Architects' 111 West 57th Rises to Supertall Height as Terracotta Facade Pieces Go Missing, 111 West 57th Street. Image © Andrew Campbell Nelson
111 West 57th Street. Image © Andrew Campbell Nelson

SHoP Architects' super-slender tower at 111 West 57th Street has reached supertall height, but the tower has begun missing pieces of its façade. As New York YIMBY revealed, sales have already started for the Manhattan skyscraper as new photographs show missing fragments of the terracotta façade. Located in Billionaire's Row just south of Central Park, the supertall is being created by JDS Development and Property Markets Group. The project aims to become an iconic terracotta skyscraper in Midtown as it passes its third setback.

111 West 57th Street. Image © Andrew Campbell Nelson 111 West 57th Street. Image © Andrew Campbell Nelson 111 West 57th Street. Image © Andrew Campbell Nelson 111 West 57th Street. Image © Andrew Campbell Nelson + 11

Explore Every Construction Project in New York City with this New Interactive Map

14:00 - 24 August, 2018
Explore Every Construction Project in New York City with this New Interactive Map, © NYC Department of Building
© NYC Department of Building

The New York City Department of Building has created a real-time interactive map detailing every major construction project currently underway in the Big Apple. Covering Brooklyn, Queens, Staten Island, Manhattan, and the Bronx, the map also ranks projects by cost, size, and height.

While most city planning portals are already freely accessible to the public, the new interface of the “NYC Active Major Construction” map presents detailed information in a clean, fast, user-friendly manner, giving architects and residents-alike a deeper insight into construction trends in what Bjarke Ingels refers to as “a capital of the world.”