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New York City: The Latest Architecture and News

SHoP Architects' 111 West 57th Street Celebrates Topping Out near Central Park

11:00 - 24 April, 2019
SHoP Architects' 111 West 57th Street Celebrates Topping Out near Central Park, © Hayes Davidson
© Hayes Davidson

The SHoP Architects-designed 111 West 57th Street has witnessed a major milestone with the topping out of its reinforced concrete superstructure, as reported by New York YIMBY. The supertall scheme, measuring 1428-feet-tall, will be the second-tallest building in New York City by roof height, and the most slender tall building in the world.

New York City's Mayor is Planning to Ban New Glass Skyscrapers

11:00 - 23 April, 2019
New York City's Mayor is Planning to Ban New Glass Skyscrapers, © Bizzi & Partners
© Bizzi & Partners

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio has announced plans to introduce a bill banning the construction of glass skyscrapers, forming part of efforts to reduce citywide greenhouse emissions by 30 percent. Unveiling the plans, he described all-glass façade skyscrapers as “incredibly inefficient” because of heat loss, according to NBC New York.

How Three Major US Cities are Preparing for Climate Change

09:00 - 22 April, 2019
How Three Major US Cities are Preparing for Climate Change, © SCAPE/City of Boston
© SCAPE/City of Boston

As the world recognizes Earth Day 2019, the public discourse is increasingly dominated by citizen action across the world manifesting a widespread fear and frustration at a perceived lack of action by governments and officials to confront the issue forthrightly. From the Extinction Rebellion protests that have gripped London, to school student strikes across 125 countries, global cities are increasingly finding themselves on the front line of a battle to limit the effects of global warming.

MAD Designs Slender Skyscraper to Soften New York City's Skyline

11:05 - 11 April, 2019
MAD Designs Slender Skyscraper to Soften New York City's Skyline, East 34th. Image Courtesy of MAD Architects
East 34th. Image Courtesy of MAD Architects

MAD Architects have revealed a new vision for New York City skyscrapers with a sinuous slender tower near the Empire State Building. Dubbed ‘East 34th’, the project was designed with a dark-colored glass facade that was made to fade into the atmosphere. Located adjacent to one of New York's most iconic structures, the project rethinks the city's rectilinear towers and sharp edges to create a new form for the Manhattan high-rise.

East 34th. Image Courtesy of MAD Architects East 34th. Image Courtesy of MAD Architects East 34th. Image Courtesy of MAD Architects East 34th. Image Courtesy of MAD Architects + 7

BIG Covers Brooklyn Highway in Landscaped Waterfront Park

10:20 - 5 April, 2019
BIG Covers Brooklyn Highway in Landscaped Waterfront Park, © Bjarke Ingels Group
© Bjarke Ingels Group

Bjarke Ingels Group has released details of their proposed landscape urbanism project in Brooklyn, New York, transforming a six-lane highway into a connected realm between the city and waterfront. The scheme centers on the Robert Moses-designed Brooklyn Queens Expressway, dating back to the 1960s.

The Shed Opens in New York's Hudson Yards

05:00 - 5 April, 2019
The Shed Opens in New York's Hudson Yards, The Shed. Image © Iwan Baan
The Shed. Image © Iwan Baan

Diller Scofidio + Renfro and Rockwell Group's iconic Shed has opened after more than a decade in the making in New York City. The building features a 120-foot telescopic shell in Hudson Yards that can extend out from the base building when needed for larger performances. Clad in ethylene tetrafluoroethylene (ETFE) “pillows,” the project is connected to the High Line on 30th Street to bring performances and art to the city's newest neighborhood,

The Shed. Image © Timothy Schenck The Shed. Image © Iwan Baan The Shed. Image © Iwan Baan The Shed. Image © Timothy Schenck + 8

New York City to Combat Rising Sea Levels by Extending the Manhattan Coastline

09:00 - 22 March, 2019
New York City to Combat Rising Sea Levels by Extending the Manhattan Coastline, via NYCEDC
via NYCEDC

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio has announced plans for a $10 billion coastal resilience project, designed to protect Lower Manhattan from flooding. In an editorial piece in New York Magazine, Mayor de Blasio outlined the ambitious plans to alter the waterfront of the Financial District, constructing a major infrastructural element up to 500 feet into the East River.

Part of the Lower Manhattan Climate Resilience Study, and designed in collaboration with climate scientists and local offices, the Mayor describes the scheme as “one of the most complex environmental and engineering challenges [New York] has ever undertaken and will, literally, alter the shape of the island of Manhattan.” The multi-billion dollar project is designed to protect Manhattan through the year 2100.

Critical Round-Up: Hudson Yards

13:00 - 18 March, 2019
Critical Round-Up: Hudson Yards, Hudson Yards. Image Courtesy of Related-Oxford
Hudson Yards. Image Courtesy of Related-Oxford

New York City’s Hudson Yards has opened its doors to the public, and the reviews are flooding in. Built on Midtown Manhattan’s West Side, the project is New York’s largest development to date and the largest private real estate venture in American history, covering almost 14 acres of land with residential towers, offices, plazas, shopping centers, and restaurants. A host of architecture firms have shaped the development, including BIG, SOM, Diller Scofidio + Renfro, Rockwell Group, and many others.

Read on to find out how critics have responded to Hudson Yards so far.

Hudson Yards. Image Courtesy of Related-Oxford Hudson Yards. Image Courtesy of Related-Oxford Hudson Yards. Image Courtesy of Related-Oxford Hudson Yards. Image Courtesy of Related-Oxford + 15

OMA's Dancing Towers will Revive Brooklyn's Post-Industrial Waterfront

11:00 - 7 March, 2019
OMA's Dancing Towers will Revive Brooklyn's Post-Industrial Waterfront, North View. Image © OMA
North View. Image © OMA

OMA, led by the firm’s partner Jason Long, has designed two towers at Greenpoint Landing in Brooklyn, New York. The towers, in conjunction with a lower seven-story building, will offer 745 housing units (30% of which are affordable) and over an acre of new public space for the neighborhood. As OMA New York’s first ground-up building in Brooklyn, the scheme will serve as “a catalyst in the transformation of the waterfront from a post-industrial edge to an accessible and dynamic part of the neighborhood.

The two towers, extending Eagle Street and Dupont Street, expand the existing waterfront esplanade, incorporating 2.5 acres of public open space along the shoreline, and 8,600 square feet of ground-floor retail. Manifesting as two dancers, the towers simultaneously lean into and away from each other. While the taller tower widens towards the east as it rises, its partner steps back from the waterfront to create a series of large terraces.

Empire View. Image © OMA Facade Diagram. Image © OMA Concept Model. Image © OMA Form Rotation. Image © OMA + 8

DXA Studio Designs New Urban Pathway for New York

04:00 - 5 March, 2019
DXA Studio Designs New Urban Pathway for New York, The Midtown Viaduct. Image Courtesy of DXA studio
The Midtown Viaduct. Image Courtesy of DXA studio

Architecture and design firm DXA studio was awarded Grand Prize for their design for an urban pathway in New York City. Submitted for Construction Magazine’s 2019 Design Challenge, the project would span 9th Avenue to connect the new Moynihan Train Hall to the High Line and Hudson Yards. The design was created to push the boundaries of contemporary steel construction and create a signature public pathway for New York.

The Midtown Viaduct. Image Courtesy of DXA studio The Midtown Viaduct. Image Courtesy of DXA studio The Midtown Viaduct. Image Courtesy of DXA studio The Midtown Viaduct. Image Courtesy of DXA studio + 10

Another Historic NYC Building Bites the Dust

10:00 - 24 February, 2019
Another Historic NYC Building Bites the Dust, © Grand Hyatt
© Grand Hyatt

New York City has gained a reputation for its soaring towers thanks to unprecedented engineering technologies and New York’s air-rights policy, which permits developers to acquire neighboring unused airspace and construct large structures without any type of previous public review. But how are these super tall skyscrapers being accommodated? By replacing older existing structures. This out-with-the-old-in-with-the-new pattern comes as no surprise, as the “concrete jungle” is gradually being axed to make room for an even larger jungle.

OMA / Shohei Shigematsu to Reimagine Sotheby’s New York Headquarters

09:00 - 22 February, 2019
OMA / Shohei Shigematsu to Reimagine Sotheby’s New York Headquarters, © OMA New York
© OMA New York

Renowned auction house Sotheby’s has unveiled a dramatic OMA/Shohei Shigematsu-designed expansion and re-imagination of their New York City headquarters. Together with OMA Associate Christy Cheng, Shigematsu has redesigned the headquarters to include vast new exhibition galleries for fine art, precious objects, luxury goods, and more. Comprising 40 galleries of varying size across four floors, the new space will increase Sotheby’s exhibition space from 67,000 square feet to 90,000 square feet.

In the proposal, nine galleries will facilitate discreet private sales for dedicated small objects such as watches and jewelry. Three two-story spaces will be set aside for exhibitions, along with a 150-foot-long space for full collections, according to The New York Times. The new space will include “dynamic repertoire” of "spatial conditions", including a white cube, double height, enfilade, corridor cascade, octagonal, and an L-shaped space.

© OMA New York © OMA New York © OMA New York © OMA New York + 14

In New York City, When Form Follows Finance the Sky's The Limit

07:00 - 18 February, 2019
Courtesy of SHoP Architects
Courtesy of SHoP Architects

The hyperreal renderings predicting New York City’s skyline in 2018 are coming to life as the city’s wealth physically manifests into the next generation of skyscrapers. Just like millennials and their ability to kill whole industries singlehandedly, we are still fixated on the supertalls: how tall, how expensive, how record-breaking? Obsession with this typology centers around their excessive, bourgeois nature, but – at least among architects – rarely has much regard for the processes which enable the phenomenon.

4 Mega Bridges that were Never Built

11:00 - 25 January, 2019
4 Mega Bridges that were Never Built, EuroRoute Bridge, between Britain and France. Image Courtesy of 911Metallurgist
EuroRoute Bridge, between Britain and France. Image Courtesy of 911Metallurgist

2019 has already witnessed a series of bridge-related milestones marked, from the world’s longest bridge nearing completion in Kuwait to the world’s largest 3D-printed concrete bridge being completed in Shanghai. As we remain fixated on the future-driven, record-breaking accomplishments of realized bridge design, "911 Metallurgist” has chosen to look back in history on some of the visionary ideas for bridges which never saw the light of day.

Whether stopped in their tracks by finance, planning, or engineering difficulties, the four bridge designs listed below embody a marriage of art and engineering too advanced for their time. From a proposal for a EuroRoute Bridge between Britain and France, to a 12-rail, 24-lane bridge across the Huston River in New York, all four designs share a common, ambitious, yet doomed vision of crossing the great divide from pen and paper to bricks and mortar.

Gensler's Tower Fifth in New York City will be the Second-Tallest Building in the Western Hemisphere

13:00 - 23 January, 2019
Gensler's Tower Fifth in New York City will be the Second-Tallest Building in the Western Hemisphere, © TMRW, courtesy of Gensler
© TMRW, courtesy of Gensler

Gensler has released details of their proposed Tower Fifth in New York City. If realized, the 1556-foot-tall scheme would be the second-tallest building not just in New York, but in the Western Hemisphere. Located east of Fifth Avenue between 51st and 52nd Street, the tower will sit adjacent to St. Patrick’s Cathedral.

According to Gensler, who designed the scheme in collaboration with developer Harry Macklowe, the tower “creates a new paradigm for how a supertall structure meets the street and interacts with its neighbors.”

Bjarke Ingels Group's XI / The Eleventh Takes Shape in New York City

14:15 - 18 January, 2019
© Paul Clemence
© Paul Clemence

New photographs by Paul Clemence from Archi-Photo show BIG -Bjarke Ingels Group’s “The Eleventh” taking shape as construction continues in Chelsea, Manhattan. Having topped out in August 2018, the scheme’s twisting geometries are taking their place within the “Pritzker District” with neighbors including Frank Gehry’s IAC Building, Jean Nouvel’s 100 11th Avenue and Foster + Partners’ 551 West 21st Street.

The development’s larger 35-story, 400-foot-tall structure will twist alongside a second 300-foot-tall sister tower, both clad with bronze and travertine, sharing a connected podium and skybridge.

© Paul Clemence © Paul Clemence © Paul Clemence © Paul Clemence + 27

New York City's Chrysler Building is Up for Sale

05:00 - 17 January, 2019
New York City's Chrysler Building is Up for Sale, Chrysler Building. Image Courtesy of Tishman Speyer
Chrysler Building. Image Courtesy of Tishman Speyer

New York City's famed Chrysler Building is up for sale for the first time in over 20 years. According to the Wall Street Journal, the art deco office tower’s current owners officially placed it on the market, though the building's value has yet to be released. Designed by William Van Alen, the building was bought by Tishman Speyer in 1997. As an iconic part of the New York skyline, the building is admired for its distinctive ornamentation based on Chrysler automobiles.

Re-Imagining New York's Central Park after an Eco-Terrorist Attack

11:00 - 31 December, 2018
Re-Imagining New York's Central Park after an Eco-Terrorist Attack, Central Cloud of Breath / Chuanfei Yu, Jiaqi Wang + Huiwen Shi (South East University – Nanjing, China). Image © LA+ Iconoclast
Central Cloud of Breath / Chuanfei Yu, Jiaqi Wang + Huiwen Shi (South East University – Nanjing, China). Image © LA+ Iconoclast

The results of the LA+ ICONCOCLAST competition have been published, asking designers to reimagine and redesign New York’s Central Park following a fictional eco-terrorist attack. In total, over 380 designers from 30 countries submitted over 190 designs, culminating in five equal winners.

Hailing from the UK, USA, China, and Australia, the winning entries ranged from "megastructures to new ecologies and radical ideas for democratizing public space.” Jury chair Richard Weller praised the winners for “how designers can move beyond the status quo of picturesque large parks and embrace the challenges and opportunities of the 21st century.”