Mónica Arellano

Content Editor at ArchDaily Mexico. Architect by UNAM (2018). Her interests focus on exploring the relationship of the body with architecture through dance. She has collaborated with different international choreographers who explore dance and architecture as an event. Twitter / Instagram: @monicarellano_

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Helical Stairways in Contemporary Mexican Architecture

One of the most important elements in architecture are the vertical circulations that are translated into elevators or stairs, and although some offices decide to approach it in a discreet way, some others choose to pay specific attention to it and turn it into a sculptural piece. Helicoidal staircases are some of the favorites when it comes to focusing attention and in our collective conscience we keep some iconic examples, as is the case of the staircase in the O'Gorman House, this piece gave a certain character to the work and it is almost impossible to imagine it without it.

The Architecture of Circular Courtyards in Mexico

One of the most important factors when designing is the specific climate of the site. This can be a difficulty when dealing with extreme climates and it is necessary to use insulating materials that adapt to the changing conditions. However, when talking about Mexico and its particular climate this works in the architects' favor allowing them to create microclimates and spaces that blur the transition of what turns out to be indoors and outdoors.

Tatiana Bilbao Designs “Tasting Room” for Tequilera Casa Dragones at Art Basel Miami Beach 2022

Mexico City-based architecture firm Tatiana Bilbao ESTUDIO presented its design for the Casa Dragones Tequila Tasting Room, which took place at Art Basel Miami Beach from December 1st to 3rd in the second year of its multi-year partnership. Founded in 2009 by Bertha Gonzalez Nieves to create tasting tequilas produced with the utmost care and expertise, Casa Dragones has become the first tequila brand to be an Official Partner of Art Basel Miami.

AZULIK and Roth Architecture Announce Their First residential Project in Tulum: "Habitable Sculptures"

The world-renowned brand, AZULIK announces the new project in Tulum, Quintana Roo which confirms its creative expansion and the growth of architectural scope: "Habitable Sculptures" its first residential complex that they describe as "a new proposal for lifestyle and sustainable luxury." The residential initiative was born from the firm Roth Architecture, continuing with the characteristic aesthetic that "puts nature as the protagonist and the user as a priority."

Campos Polanco: A New Tourism Concept With Different Typologies Of Residences In Mexico City

As part of a new concept that offers a proposal of tourism and rest, in an art deco building, Campos Polanco opened its doors in September of this year. Located in front of the Garden of the Republic of Lebanon on one side of the Chapultepec Forest in Mexico City, the project puts in place 12 suites created for executives and digital nomads looking to get away from chain hotels to immerse themselves in the local culture in one of the most exclusive areas of the city.

UNESCO, Airbnb and Mexico City Government Create Alliance to Promote Tourism for “Digital Nomads”

The Government of Mexico City, UNESCO and Airbnb announced an alliance "to position the city as the capital of creative tourism and remote workers in Latin America". The announcement was made known through the Mexico City Government's social networks and Airbnb's news section. However, on August 9th, 2021, UNESCO unveiled the strategy with the intention of "contributing to the reactivation of tourism in a responsible and sustainable way in Mexico, and extending the benefits of cultural and creative tourism to more communities, Airbnb will promote, with the accompaniment of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization ("UNESCO"), destinations and experiences outside the traditional tourist circuit."

Designed by Alfonso Ramírez Ponce and Inspired by the Work of Félix Candela: History of LAGO/ALGO Architecture in Mexico City

Designed by Alfonso Ramírez Ponce and Inspired by the Work of Félix Candela: History of LAGO/ALGO Architecture in Mexico City - Image 5 of 4
© LAGO/ALGO

Mexico City is undoubtedly one of the most exciting and effervescent cities on the cultural and architectural scene in recent decades. Various authors have positioned it inside and outside the country through projects that make up a meeting platform for the creative community. LAGO/ALGO is part of the list of those resilient spaces that emerged from the pandemic, with the need to reimagine our current context by rethinking how we relate to the public and private space having the iconic Chapultepec Forest as a stage, an 810-hectare urban park that is divided into four sections which harbor some of the most important tourist sites in Mexico.

Frida Escobedo Among the 100 Emerging Leaders by TIME 2022

Each year, TIME publishes TIME100 Next, a list, inspired by its flagship TIME100, seeking to recognize 100 people from all industries around the world whose careers are on the rise. As a result, the 2022 TIME100 Next list features high-profile musicians and medical professionals, government officials, movement leaders and whistleblowers along with top CEOs, all selected by TIME journalists. However, in this year's list it is possible to recognize the only professional that represents the guild: the Mexican architect Frida Escobedo.

Alejandro Aravena Designs ‘Elemental House’ in Monterrey, Mexico

As part of a Tec de Monterrey initiative, this year the First Prize of the 213th Traditional Tec Draw is being held with a work by the Chilean architect who won the 2016 Pritzker Prize, Alejandro Aravena. Elemental House, is the second of the Houses of the 75th Anniversary of Sorteos Tec, which is celebrated this year.

Mexican Interiors: 16 Bedrooms with Terraces

Over the years, interior design has evolved according to the needs that arise, but above all according to the experiences it seeks to evoke in the user. In the last two years we have witnessed a radical change and a special interest in this subject because the pandemic forced us to pay specific attention to the configuration of the places we inhabit. This brought about much more holistic designs that seek to address the wellbeing of the user, combining colours, sensory experiences, technology and natural elements that promote health.

The Almine Rech Gallery In New York Presents An Exhibition Of Tapestries Made By Le Corbusier

For sixty years, Le Corbusier used a wide variety of media to explore the themes and forms of his art, ranging from drawing to urbanism and including painting, architecture, and sculpture. He first discovered tapestry in 1936, in response to a request from Marie Cuttoli, who was then commissioning artworks woven in a factory in Aubusson from modern painters. However, it was twelve years later that he expressed his interest in producing woven artworks based on his drawings and found his way to this city in central France, where a true renaissance of tapestry had begun, at the initiative of Jean Lurçat and Jean Picart Le Doux.

Rojkind Arquitectos Designs Tequila Distillery in the Metaverse

As part of an initiative for Tequila José Cuervo, Rojkind Arquitectos presents its new and first project of the metaverse under the name "Metadestilería" (Metadistillery) which is based on a design exercise that responds to the function of objects with respect to human needs within specific contexts with the challenge of creating unique experiences through objects and architecture.

21 Spaces in Mexico That Integrate Hammocks for Rest and Contemplation

One of the most representative non-fixed elements of the tropical zones of Mexico are the hammocks, as they are part of the history and daily life, representing an important piece of furniture in the houses. Although it is true that the hammock is not originally from Mexico, it is thought that it may have arrived in the Yucatan Peninsula and was adopted throughout the southeast of the country in areas whose temperature and humidity require a kind of floating bed. In the case of the Mayan region, hammocks were initially made of Hamack tree bark. Later, both in the Mexican region and in the rest of Central America, the sisal plant, with softer and more elastic fibres, began to be used.

Interior Design: Houses in Mexico That Include Bathtubs

Over the years, interior design has evolved according to the needs that arise, but above all according to the experiences it seeks to evoke in the user. In the last two years we have witnessed a radical change and a special interest in this subject because the pandemic forced us to pay specific attention to the configuration of the places we inhabit. This brought about much more holistic designs that seek to address the wellbeing of the user, combining colours, sensory experiences, technology and natural elements that promote health.

Mexican Interiors: 46 Dining Spaces in Houses and Flats

Over the years, interior design has evolved according to the needs that arise, but above all according to the experiences it seeks to evoke in the user. In the last two years we have witnessed a radical change and a special interest in this subject because the pandemic forced us to pay specific attention to the configuration of the places we inhabit. This has brought about much more holistic designs that seek to address the wellbeing of the user, combining colours, sensory experiences, technology and natural elements that promote health.