reGEN Boston: Energizing Urban Living Competition

Boston Society of Architects Housing Committee and Emerging Professionals Network Presents reGEN Boston: Energizing Urban Housing, an international ideas competition with presenting sponsor First Republic Bank.

In the 21st Century, more people than ever will be living in Cities. Generations are drawn together through the lifestyles a city can provide. In response to growing density in Urban areas, cities will renovate and re-purpose existing areas, and new urban centers are ripe to erupt. What new housing typologies will support this love for urban living? If , and other cities, want to retain their diverse demographic, and lasting appeal, there needs to be an enticing solution for housing or, the cities risks losing their greatest asset, residents.

ReGEN Boston seeks innovative housing typologies to responds to Boston’s need to house the continuing life-cycles of its residents. The City needs a new round of planning, charged with harnessing growth and extending it to the many neighborhoods, many of which have been overlooked or under valued.

Apple Redesigns San Francisco Store to Preserve Historic Fountain

Foster + Partners’ revised design for the new SF .. Image Courtesy of

Earlier this summer we reviewed plans for a new Foster + Partners-designed Apple Store in the heart of San Francisco which received a considerable amount of backlash for its accused ubiquitous design that disregarded the city’s historic Ruth Asawa Fountain. Since, Apple has decided to respond to the complaints and Foster + Partners have just released images of the revised design that preserves the fountain. 

Rural Studio Celebrates 20th Anniversary with Eight 20K Houses

Auburn University‘s Rural Studio, an undergraduate program that focuses on designing well-built, low-cost housing for the poor across three counties of Alabama, will be celebrating its 20th anniversary this 2013-14 academic year. Since 1993, has been recycling, reusing, remaking and using local materials while maintaining the belief that both rich and poor deserve good design. In honor of 20 successful years of helping ’s rural poor, will, for the first time, design eight 20K Houses in one year- and they need your help.

Petersen Automotive Museum Unveils Eye-Catching New Exterior by Kohn Pedersen Fox

Courtesy of Petersen Automotive Museum

The Petersen Automotive Museum in Los Angeles has announced that it will celebrate its 20th anniversary in 2014 with a redesign of its interior and a complete transformation of its exterior facade to create a “world class museum that will showcase the art, experience, culture and heritage of the automobile.” The exterior design by Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates will give the Petersen a truly unique and iconic look that will hopefully attract architecture and car enthusiasts alike.

More on the museum’s drastic transformation after the break.

The Indicator: Two Shows, Many Cities: “A New Scuplturalism” at MOCA and “Never Built” at the A+D Museum

Pereira and Luckman, LAX original plan, 1952, Rendering. Courtesy World Airports Flight Path Learning Center.

Here in Los Angeles we have a complicated relationship with architecture and two con-current museum exhibitions demonstrate this in ironic and puzzling ways. This came into clear relief when, on Saturday, August 03, 2013, something amazing and unprecedented happened: architecture was on the front page of a major US newspaper, the Los Angeles Times.

This, it must be said, is a very unusual thing for architecture. Moreover, it was not the type of architecture you might expect to grab the spotlight. It was the un-built original plan for Los Angeles International Airport by Pereira and Luckman, c. 1952. If you’ve been to LAX you’ve seen their Theme Building. They also did the plan for LAX that was finally accepted—the less visionary, less ambitious plan. This was being re-presented to the world in the context of “Never Built” a show about the unrealized architectural dreams of Los Angeles currently showing at the A+D Museum.

Dogsalon / Naoko Horibe

© Yuko Tada

Architects: Naoko Horibe
Location: , Oita, Japan
Area: 66.25 sqm
Year: 2012
Photographs: Yuko Tada

Zaha Hadid’s One Thousand Museum Tower for Miami Revealed

© ZHA

New renderings of Zaha Hadid Architect‘s 215 meter-high One Thousand Museum Tower in downtown have been released. As the first Zaha Hadid-designed skyscraper to grace the skyline of the Western Hemisphere, the 60-story luxury condominium will mask its program with a prominent concrete exoskeleton. As Hadid described to the Wall Street Journal, the tower is designed with an interest in “how the structure is manifested” so that it may avoid the “generic modernist typology” that is commonly found in Miami.

One Thousand Museum Tower is one of several by high-profile architects that are beginning to take root in Miami, changing the tide of investment from real estate that is solely driven by waterfront locations to architecture that is high-end and luxurious.

Read on for more images and information…

Why Bankruptcy May Be the Best Thing for Detroit

M@dison Building, a tech hub in . Image via Inc.com

While the rest of the world scoffs at Detroit’s recent announcement of bankruptcy (using it as an opportunity to bemoan how far the city – and the country – has fallen since its golden Motown days), many Detroiters themselves are embracing the move as a long overdue turning point.

Like Las Vegas, undergoing an urban patronage from Zappos CEO Tony Hsieh, Detroit has similarly been the focus of its own CEO: native-Detroiter and Quicken founder Dan Gilbert. By channeling over $1 billion dollars into the city, and inspiring others to follow suit, Gilbert is helping Detroit attract young, tech-savvy entrepreneurs. Throw in the lure of cheap land/rental rates, and it’s no wonder the city’s is host to a burgeoning tech scene.

The only thing that’s been getting in these techies’ way – is the city itself. Which is why many are hopeful that Detroit’s bankruptcy is just the beginning.

More after the break…

Study Reveals US States with Highest Pay, Most Equality

Surprisingly, Hawaii was revealed to have both a very high number of architects, and high levels of pay. Image via Shutterstock

Figures released last month by the National Endowment for the Arts offer telling insight into the architecture profession across the US, with a helpful breakdown of the representation of various demographic groups.

The data, collected between 2006-2010, reports the number of architects in each state and their race, gender, age and income. The data reveals which states have the highest/lowest income, the best/worst gender discrepancies, and also offer insights into the average age and races of architects, per state. 

Read more about what the NEA statistics reveal after the break.

AD Round Up: Iconic Houses in America

© Robert Ruschak – Western Pennsylvania Conservancy

Five great architects, five great houses. This 4th of July, take a look at five of the most iconic houses in the USA. The main image is of a house that redefined the relationship between man, architecture and nature — ’s Fallingwater House. If you’re searching for the meaning of less is more, you must check out the Mies van der Rohe’s Farnsworth House or The Glass House by Philip Johnson. You should also check out one of the first built examples of Postmodern architecture, The Vanna Venturi House by Robert Venturi. Finally, revisit ’s Norton House, known for its eccentric form and eclectic materiality. Which one is your favorite?

2013 “Redesigning Detroit: A New Vision for an Iconic Site” Winners Announced

1st Place “MINICITY ” by Davide Marchetti and Erin Pellegrino

Rock Ventures LLC and Bedrock Real Estate Services has announced the winners of Opportunity Detroit’s international design competition which solicited ideas for a potential signature project on the former Hudson’s Department Store site in downtown Detroit. The three winning design ideas came from Rome, Italy; Kalamazoo, Michigan; and Southfield, Michigan. More images and information on the winning entries after the break.

Improving Residential Market Leads to Larger Homes and an Increase in Property Enhancements

Paschke Danskin Double Loft, Rhode Island / 3six0 Architecture © John Homer Photography

According to the AIA, The American Institute of Architects, the American housing market is at its strongest growth level since 2005. As the once struggling residential market continues to improve, the size of homes is also growing in both high-end and custom homes as well as in additions to existing homes. Data from the reveals that preferences for accessible spaces in homes – such as open-space layouts and single-floor design – is also on the rise.

To see the survey’s findings and to learn more about today’s housing market, read on.

What Does San Francisco’s New Apple Store Say About Commercial Architecture?

Rendering of the proposed in Union Square

This past May, Apple filed plans to close its existing flagship retail store at 1 Stockton Street in San Francisco and move it three blocks north to one of the city’s most popular spots: Union Square. This plan was met with enthusiasm from city officials until they realized that Apple, and the store’s architects at Foster + Partners, were disregarding a beloved bronze folk art fountain by sculptor Ruth Asawa that currently occupies the site. Many have also criticized the store’s design for being a characterless box of metal and glass that contributes nothing unique to the local landscape, raising awareness of a commercial architecture defined more by trademark and less by its surroundings.

More on Apple’s proposal in San Francisco and the problems of trademarked design after the break.

MoMA presents ‘Le Corbusier: An Atlas of Modern Landscapes’

Urban Plan for Algiers, project Plan and perspective. 1935. / Le Corbusier; The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Purchase. © 2012 Artists Rights Society (ARS)

The Le Corbusier: An Atlas of Modern Landscapes exhibit at the MoMA opens on June 15th. The exhibit will be centered around Le Corbusier‘s worldview of architecture.  It explores both his most famous architectural projects, as well as the means by which he was able to realize them.  Through a collection of early watercolors, drawings and photographs, curator Jean-Louis Cohen provides a peak into Le Corbusier’s journeys and developments as an architect, revealing how he explored the world and what he drew from his travels and observations.

More on ‘Le Corbusier: An Atlas of Modern Landscapes’ after the break.

Video: American Design Club

The American Design Club (AmDC) was conceived in the spring of 2008. At that time, America’s relevance in the design world was being questioned, with some postulating that US-based designers would never be as influential or productive as their European counterparts. Looking around, however, all they saw was talent and ambition in our fellow American designers, from close friends to former employers to recent design school graduates. What was missing was an avenue for these designers to share their work with a broad audience. The AmDC’s founding members resolved to improve the situation by creating a platform from which designers could launch new ideas and connect with one another.

Who Should Win the OMA vs. BIG Miami Showdown?

© BIG

The , a giant box of a building constructed in 1957, is in desperate need of a makeover and two design teams have bravely accepted the challenge. Team 1 is dubbed South Beach ACE (Arts, Culture, Entertainment District) and is a collaboration between Rem Koolhaas‘s OMA firm, Tishman, UIA, MVVA, Raymond Jungles and TVS. Team 2 goes by the name of Miami Beach Square and includes BIG, West 8, Fentress, JPA and Portman CMC. Both proposals completely re-imagine 52 acres of prime beach real estate and cost over a billion dollars in public and private funds. So, who does it better? 

Vote for your favorite after the break…

AD Architecture School Guide: Portland State University School of Architecture

image via sageclassroom.com

Social justice. How can that be achieved? At Portland State University School of Architecture, faculty and students are exploring just this issue in different forms. Often when people think of or the state of Oregon, images of “crunchy” eco-“warriors” come to mind, but these issues are not simply proxies for a lifestyle or consumer choices. Rather, when discussing people and ecology, the issues are about resources. Specifically, how do humans use and allocate resources to promote fair, well-distributed advancements rather than exploitation, oppression and conspicuous consumption.

OMA Proposes Radical Redevelopment Plan for the Miami Beach Convention Center

Aerial from SW; Courtesy of OMA

South Beach ACE just unveiled their master plan for the redevelopment of the Beach Convention Center site. Currently in a battle with BIG and Portman CMC for the right to overhaul the 52-acre site, national developer Tishman, international architecture firm OMA, international firm TVS, and developer UIA Management comprise the South Beach ACE team. The vision involves bringing to life one of Miami Beach’s most underutilized public sites with a fully-revamped convention center capable of luring major events from around the world, an iconic hotel, inviting green spaces, low-density retail uses, and cultural venues. 

More images and the team’s description after the break…