National Building Museum Honors Charlie Rose with Vincent Scully Prize

Courtesy of

The National Building Museum has announced Charlie Rose as the recipient of the 2014 Vincent Scully Prize. The American talk show host and journalist was honored for his exploration “good design, the growth of cities, and the shape of the urban form through his insightful and substantive conversations with leading thinkers of our day.”

“One of the great joys of spending twenty-five years at the table is meeting a cross-section of the best in culture and science and technology,” said Rose. “I have a special place for the men and women who inspire us with the buildings they create. Architecture is a passion of mine and I’ve been proud to know not only architects but also those who teach, assess, and love great buildings. Architecture is one of the reflections of the permanence of a civilization. I am indeed honored to be the recipient of the Vincent Scully Prize, named for a man I have known, admired, and interviewed.”

BIG Maze Opens at National Building Museum

© Matthew Carbone, www.matthewcarbone.com

Images and video of the BIG Labyrinth have begun to appear on social media since it opened on July 4th at the National Building Museum (NBM)  in Washington, DC. 

The 61×61 foot maze, housed in the building’s grand atrium, will be open to visitors until September 1st. See more images and video, after the break…

BIG Designs Labyrinth for Atrium of National Building Museum

© . Image Courtesy of National Building Museum

The National Building Museum (NBM) has announced that BIG has designed a 61×61 foot maze to be housed in the building’s grand atrium from July 4th to September 1st of this year. According to the NBM’s website, the labyrinth’s Baltic birch plywood walls, which stand 18 feet high at the maze’s periphery, descend as you make your way towards the center. From the core, then, visitors receive a view of the entire layout – and a better understanding of how to get back out.

According to , “The concept is simple: as you travel deeper into a maze, your path typically becomes more convoluted. What if we invert this scenario and create a maze that brings clarity and visual understanding upon reaching the heart of the labyrinth?” Of course, those uninterested in the challenge of figuring out the maze can peek down on it from the Museum’s second and third floors – but where would be the fun in that?

More images, diagrams and drawings after the break!

High Line Co-Founders Awarded Vincent Scully Prize

© Iwan Baan

The National Building Museum has awarded the 15th Vincent Scully Prize to Joshua David and Robert Hammond, the founders of the High Line in New York. In 1999 the pair formed the non-profit organisation Friends of the High Line; this award recognizing their efforts in transforming the abandoned structure is the latest accolade for the internationally celebrated project. David and Hammond were also awarded the Jane Jacobs Medal in 2010.

Read more about the award and the High Line after the break.

Kevin Roche: Architecture as Environment

Ford Foundation HQ/ Courtesy John Dinkeloo and Associates

Kevin Roche: Architecture as Environment will be opening June 16th, 2012 at the in Washington, D.C. The exhibit, organized by Yale Institute, will celebrate Kevin Roche’s expansive portfolio, from his early days as Eero Saarinen’s “right-hand man” through the founding of his practice in the 1960s with John Dinkeloo (KRJDA). The exhibit will include images, drawings, interviews, models, as well as original slide presentations to clients. More on the exhibit after the break.

Exhibit: Unbuilt Washington


View Unbuilt Washington in a larger map

“Imagine that you are traveling into Washington, D.C., from northern Virginia. As you approach the Potomac River, you see the tall, craggy, medieval-looking towers of the Ulysses S. Grant Memorial Bridge looming in the foreground, largely blocking the view of the National Mall beyond. As you reach the end of the bridge, now you can clearly see the enormous pyramid that was built to honor Abraham Lincoln. Going around to the side of the pyramid, you note the odd, pagoda-like structure dedicated to George Washington—a design that was executed after the original obelisk had stood unfinished for decades. Surrounding these monuments are informal paths that meander through dense woods, which help to filter the noise from the two elevated highways running along either side of the Mall. Barely visible in the distance is the Capitol, a dignified but modest structure that looks rather like a classroom building at a liberal arts college, topped by a tiny cupola.”

The presents Unbuilt Washington – an exhibit that reveals what Washington could have been if a number of extravagant architectural proposals where constructed. The exhibit explores the motives and trends of the forgotten architecture, while investigating why the designs where never realized. Imagine what the impact would be if they existed today.

The exhibit began November 19th and will remain open until May 28th, 2012.

Reference: National Building Museum

LEGO Architecture: Towering Ambition / Adam Reed Tucker

LEGO Architecture Towering Ambition / Adam Reed Tucker
© Flickr uploader kimberlyfaye

Growing up, LEGO were a staple of most children’s playtime activities to create anything from a house to an entire city for hours at a time.  The blocks were so captivating that it seems that even as we outgrow our childhood years, we can never outgrow the toys.  Previously, we’ve featured projects that have shown James May’s addiction…his actual house is built from LEGOs!  Yet, May isn’t the only one to still show an interest in the children toys – architect Adam Reed Tucker has created 15 large scale buildings from around the world just using the blocks.   The buildings are the focal point of the exhibition LEGO® Architecture: Towering Ambition at the in Washington, DC.

More about Tucker after the break.