First Look Inside OFFICEUS, the US Pavilion at the 2014 Venice Biennale

01:00 - 4 June, 2014
First Look Inside OFFICEUS, the US Pavilion at the 2014 Venice Biennale, © Nico Saieh
© Nico Saieh

To kick off our coverage of the Venice Biennale, we're bringing you photos of OfficeUS -- the United States' contribution to the national exhibitions organized under the theme of "Absorbing Modernity." The pavilion houses both a repository of information about the history of architectural firms in the US (with a focus on the US's role in exporting architecture) and serves as the base of operations for a new architectural firm that was created solely for this year's biennale. The research, collected into booklets, lines the walls of the space. While visitors mill around the pavilion, the members of OfficeUS work at specially designed tables. The output and deliverables of the office will be determined as the Biennale progresses. We also got the chance to speak to the organizers, so stayed tuned for video interviews with the curators and designers of the US Pavilion (coming soon!). For now, however, read on to the see the curator's statement on the exhibit.

Exhibition: Five Proposals for the Future of the Atlantic Yards

00:00 - 4 June, 2014
Exhibition: Five Proposals for the Future of the Atlantic Yards

Warehouse 623 Gallery is pleased to announce "Five Proposals for the Future of the Atlantic Yards", an exhibition of alternative architectural schemes for the Atlantic Yards site. "Abstracts of New York", a selection of photographs by Jean-Marc Bellaiche, will be shown concurrently.

Exhibition / Knud Lonberg-Holm: The Invisible Architect

00:00 - 27 May, 2014
Exhibition / Knud Lonberg-Holm: The Invisible Architect, Radio Broadcasting Station / Photograph of Model / Detroit, 1925 / Vintage gelatin silver print / 4 7/8 x 6 7/8 inches (12.4 x 17.5 cm)
Radio Broadcasting Station / Photograph of Model / Detroit, 1925 / Vintage gelatin silver print / 4 7/8 x 6 7/8 inches (12.4 x 17.5 cm)

Ubu Gallery is pleased to present Knud Lonberg-Holm: The Invisible Architect, a debut exhibition devoted to this overlooked, yet highly influential, 20th Century modernist. Never-before-seen photographs, architectural drawings, letters, graphic design, and ephemera from Lonberg-Holm’s remarkably diverse career will be on view through August 1, 2014. The exhibition, which consists of selections from the extensive archive assembled by architectural historian Marc Dessauce, will solidify the importance of this emblematic figure in early 20th Century cultural and architectural history. Metropolis Magazine, the national publication of architecture and design, will publish an article on Knud Lonberg-Holm to coincide with this groundbreaking exhibition.

Exhibition / Open to the Public: Civic Space Now

00:00 - 23 May, 2014
Exhibition / Open to the Public: Civic Space Now

This summer, the American Institute of Architects New York Chapter (AIANY) and the Center for Architecture Foundation will present Open to the Public: Civic Space Now, an exhibition exploring why people gravitate to (or avoid) civic spaces – the places between buildings where people can assemble. Curated by Thomas Mellins and designed by Athletics, the exhibition opens Thursday, June 12, 6:00 PM and runs through Saturday, September 6 in the main galleries at the Center for Architecture, 536 LaGuardia Place. 

Exhibition: World’s Fairs / Lost Utopias

00:00 - 21 May, 2014
Exhibition: World’s Fairs / Lost Utopias, © 2014 Jade Doskow New York 1964 World’s Fair, “Peace Through Understanding,” New York State Pavilion, Winter
© 2014 Jade Doskow New York 1964 World’s Fair, “Peace Through Understanding,” New York State Pavilion, Winter

In celebration of the 50-year anniversary of the 1964 New York World’s Fair, Onishi Project and Kipton Cronkite are pleased to present World’s Fairs: Lost Utopias, the debut exhibition of Jade Doskow’s groundbreaking 7-year photography project. The exhibition will also include a 1968 triptych by Robert Rauschenberg and a dynamic group show---featuring Alexandra Posen, Greg Haberny, Naomi Reis, and Mark Freedman--- inspired by the cultural zeitgeist that surrounded this event.

Conference: Social Housing in Spain

00:00 - 21 May, 2014
Conference: Social Housing in Spain, © EmphasizeLLC
© EmphasizeLLC

Social Housing in Spain is intended to be the first of a series of international programs by the AIANY Housing Committee, highlighting exemplary housing design around the world. For the first program of the series, AIANY have invited three leading architects from Spain who are currently teaching in the tri-state area: Carmen Espegel, Iñaqui Carnicero, and María Hurtado de Mendoza. The panelists will present and comment upon innovative projects that follow the country’s strong social commitment to housing.

Request for Proposals: The Energetic City / Connectivity in the Public Realm

01:00 - 16 May, 2014
Request for Proposals: The Energetic City / Connectivity in the Public Realm

The Design Trust for Public Space announces The Energetic City: Connectivity in the Public Realm, a new request for project proposals to redefine public space. 

Exhibition: TALL DC / New Monumentalism

00:00 - 15 May, 2014
Exhibition: TALL DC / New Monumentalism

Since it was enacted by Congress, the Height of Buildings Act of 1910 has restricted how tall buildings can be designed in the District of Columbia.

Competing Utopias: An Experimental Installation of Cold War Modern Design from East and West in One Context

00:00 - 15 May, 2014
Competing Utopias: An Experimental Installation of Cold War Modern Design from East and West in One Context, Poster Design: David Hartwell, 2014
Poster Design: David Hartwell, 2014

Competing Utopias is a design collision that should never happen. But somehow, in Los Angeles, in 2014, twenty-five years after the fall of the Berlin Wall, it will.

Architecture in the USA Today - In Infographics

00:00 - 5 May, 2014
Architecture in the USA Today - In Infographics, Schools and students of architecture are overwhelmingly focused in the North East. At the other end of the scale are the states of the Gulf Coast. Image Courtesy of ACSA
Schools and students of architecture are overwhelmingly focused in the North East. At the other end of the scale are the states of the Gulf Coast. Image Courtesy of ACSA

As part of their ongoing ACSA Atlas Project, the Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture (ACSA) has just released a new set of infographics, showcasing a range of statistics relevant to both architecture students and professionals alike. The 10 images cover a range of issues, including: demographic concerns such as race and gender, economic concerns such as salaries and employment futures, and the number of architects and students in each state. Read on after the break for the full set.

Wynwood Gateway Park Competition

01:00 - 1 May, 2014
Wynwood Gateway Park Competition

Metro 1 has partnered with DawnTown Miami to present an international ideas, design and build competition for a true urban park in the heart of the burgeoning Wynwood Arts District in Miami, Florida. The winning design team will have their idea and proposal built as well as a cash prize of $10,000.

Light Matters: Richard Kelly, The Unsung Master Behind Modern Architecture’s Greatest Buildings

01:00 - 29 April, 2014
Light Matters: Richard Kelly, The Unsung Master Behind Modern Architecture’s Greatest Buildings, Seagram Building, New York.
Seagram Building, New York.

Richard Kelly illuminated some of the twentieth century’s most iconic buildings: the Glass House, Seagram Building and Kimbell Art Museum, to name a few. His design strategy was surprisingly simple, but extremely successful. 

Lighting for architecture has been and still often is dominated by an engineering viewpoint, resigned to determining sufficient illuminance levels for a safe and efficient working environment. With a background in stage lighting, Kelly introduced a scenographic perspective for architectural lighting. His point of view might look self-evident to today’s architectural community, but it was revolutionary for his time and has strongly influenced modern architecture.

Read more about Richard Kelly’s remarkable, and unsung, contribution to architecutre, after the break.

Entrance, Seagram Building, New York. Image © Ezra Stoller/Esto Seagram Building, New York. Image © Thomas Schielke Entrance, Seagram Building, New York. Image © Ezra Stoller/Esto Bar, Four Seasons Restaurant, Seagram Building, New York. Image © Hagen Stier +11

Reanimate the Ruins International Design Competition

01:00 - 28 April, 2014
Reanimate the Ruins International Design Competition

Once the fourth largest city in America, Michigan’s primary Metropolis, Detroit has recently filed the largest municipal bankruptcy in the history of the United States.  Among the many reasons for Detroit’s decline, two stand out: an undiversified economic model, reliant on the production and sale of automobiles, and an unprecedented degree of sprawl. Currently more than 77% of jobs in the metropolitan area reside more than ten miles from the city center, making Detroit the most job-sprawled city in the US and stretching city services beyond capacity.  Detroit’s deterioration is just as much about urban decline as it is about industrial decline.  Detroit is located in the Midwest portion of the United States and is part of a larger band of cities known as the Rust Belt which have gone through a process of decline over the past decades.

Rodrigo Nino: In Defense of Crowdsourcing and Crowdfunding

00:00 - 24 April, 2014
The 17John Building in New York. Image Courtesy of Prodigy Network
The 17John Building in New York. Image Courtesy of Prodigy Network

As both crowdsourcing and crowdfunding gather momentum in the architecture world, they also gather criticism. The crowdsourcing design website Arcbazar, for example, has recently attracted critics who label it as “the worst thing to happen to architecture since the internet started.” A few months ago, I myself strongly criticized the 17John apartment-hotel in New York for stretching the definition of "crowdfunding" to the point where it lost validity, essentially becoming a meaningless buzzword.

In response to this criticism, I spoke to Rodrigo Nino, the founder of Prodigy Network, the company behind 17 John, who offered to counter my argument. Read on after the break for his take on the benefits of tapping into the 'wisdom of crowds.'

McMansions: The Ultimate Symbol of American Inequality

00:00 - 23 April, 2014
McMansions: The Ultimate Symbol of American Inequality, © Flickr CC User Doug Downen
© Flickr CC User Doug Downen

In this fascinating post for Salon, Thomas Frank holds nothing back on the topic of so-called "McMansions". Charting their history from the 1980s to today, he reveals the economics and government policies which made them possible, concluding that they are not just a symptom of the inequality in modern US society, but the very cause of it: "Everything we do seems designed to make this thing possible... This stupendous, staring banality is the final outcome for which we have sacrificed everything else." You can read the full article here.

City-County Building Plaza Design Competition

01:00 - 23 April, 2014
City-County Building Plaza Design Competition

The City-County Building Plaza Design Competition is seeking a final conceptual design that would be implemented on an existing 1.94 acre open space on the City-County Building Property also known as the City-County Building Plaza (CCB Plaza). 

Conference: Cities for Tomorrow

00:00 - 17 April, 2014
Conference: Cities for Tomorrow

Building resilient and sustainable urban centers. That's going to be the main issue that over 30 speakers will be addressing at the Cities for Tomorrow Conference next Tuesday, April 22 at TheTimesCenter, NY. The event, hosted by NY Times architecture critic Michael Kimmelman, will feature Shigeru Ban's first public appearance since winning the Pritzker Architecture Prize. His presentation will be on the eve of the conference, on Monday, April 21. Although the reception is invitation-only, we will be live-tweeting the presentation.

Christoph Gielen's "Ciphers": Aerial Views of American Sprawl

01:00 - 14 April, 2014
Christoph Gielen's "Ciphers": Aerial Views of American Sprawl, Courtesy of Jovis Verlag
Courtesy of Jovis Verlag

From the Publisher. Christoph Gielen’s aerial views offer a look at America’s most aberrant and unusual sprawl forms in ways we usually don’t get to see them: from far above the ground—a vantage point that reveals both the intricate geometry as well as the idiosyncratic allure of these developments. Here, encountering sprawl becomes an aesthetic experience that at the same time leaves us with a sense of foreboding, of seeing the “writing on the wall”. At once fascinating and profoundly unsettling, these photographs detail the potential ramifications of unchecked urbanization. When these settlements were developed, neither distance from work place nor gasoline prices much mattered in determining the locations of new constructions. These places are relics from an era that was entirely defined by a belief in unlimited growth, of bigger is better. The startling extent of those practices, and their inherent wastefulness, come to light in Gielen’s pictures—as if looking at a microcosm of non-sustainability through a giant magnifier.

Contributing essays by Johann Frederik Hartle, Galina Tachieva, Srdjan Jovanic Weiss, Susannah Sayler and Edward Morris contextualize Gielen’s work by focusing on a range of aspects, from aesthetics to climate change and futurology. They also examine why taking a closer look at these places is particularly crucial at this juncture, when we are faced with a new wave of building booms in developing nations such as in China.