AIA President Mickey Jacob Urges Congress to Aid Sandy Relief

Photography: The Rockaways, Post-Sandy © Amanda Kirkpatrick

In response an outrage that broke out amongst Democrats and Republicans, after House Speaker John Boehner failed to vote for Sandy relief before the end of the Congressional session two days ago, the House of Representatives have approved a $9.7 billion relief measure to aid flood victims of Hurricane Sandy. This is good news, as the Federal Emergency Management Agency’s (FEMA) recently warned that it would soon run out of funding if no measures were taken. Senate approval is likely to come later in the day and a second congressional vote is scheduled to take place on January 15 for a larger $51 billion request.

Understanding the importance of issuing this federal support,  President Mickey Jacob has offer Congress three key objects for helping these communities recover.

Read AIA President Jacob’s letter to congress and his three objectives after the break…

The Biggest Complaint of 2012: Insufficient Pay

© Tulane Public Relations

For many young architects the biggest complaint of 2012 has been insufficient pay in exchange for hard work and long hours under the guise of an . As if graduating with a degree in architecture is not grueling enough, NCARB, the US architectural licensing board also requires three years (amounting to thousands of hours) of training under a licensed architect, followed by a seven-part exam.  Becoming an architect takes an exceptional amount of commitment, time and money.  College graduates are already shaking under the weight of student loans and a stunted economy and job market; but what makes matters worse is that architecture as a profession has gained a reputation for exploiting recent graduates by hiring them as interns with little or no compensation.

2013 can be the year to turn this trend around.  Is the architectural profession willing to make this resolution?

Follow us after the break for more.

AIA Comments on “Fiscal Cliff” Vote

The American Institute of Architects () today issued the following statement in reaction to the House and Senate votes approving the “Fiscal Cliff” deal negotiated by Congressional leaders earlier this week. The statement should be attributed to President Mickey Jacob, FAIA:

“On the plus side, the agreement prevents a tax increase on millions of Americans and small businesses. It also extends several business tax incentives that help create jobs and promote design and construction, including for schools and energy efficient homes.”

More after the break…

2013 Institute Honors for Collaborative Achievement Recipients

Three influential groups have been chosen by the American Institute of Architects (AIA) to receive the 2013 Institute Honors for Collaborative Achievement. The award recognizes and encourages distinguished achievements of allied professionals, clients, organizations, architect teams, knowledge communities, and others who have had a beneficial influence on or advanced the architectural profession.

This year’s award goes to: the Chicago Architecture Foundation for DiscoverDesign.org, the Palm Springs Modern Committee (), and the . Continue reading to learn how these three programs have had a positive impact on the profession.

NYC Developers Race to the Top

© Adam Jackson

It’s a race to the top as developers are reaching higher and higher with impressive glass skyscrapers that house exclusive apartments and panoramic views across Manhattan, level with some of the city’s tallest buildings.   of Extell Development Co. is the man behind the 1,005 foot high One57 tower in Midtown Manhattan.  He announced last month that he would be developing the tallest residential building in (without the help of a spire).  Adrian Smith, chosen as the architect for the job, is best known for his work on the Burj Dubai.  The new building, still in its early stages of design planning and financing, will tower over the Empire State Building at a planned 1600 feet, that’s just 176 feet shy of World Trade One, the tallest building in Manhattan.

ABI Reports Strongest Business Conditions Since 2007

November 2012 via Calculated Risk

The numbers are in and the American Institute of Architects’ November Architecture Billings Index (ABI) has revealed positive business conditions for all building sectors for the fourth consecutive month.

As a leading economic indicator of construction activity, the ABI reflects the approximate nine to twelve month lag time between architecture billings and construction spending. Understanding this, the is pleased to report that November has reached a five-year high with a score of 53.2, slightly up from 52.8 in October. Since August, the national billings index has continued to increased above 50.0 – the break-even point between contraction and growth – reflecting a steady rise in demand for design services. The West seems to be the only region in contraction, coming in at a score of 49.6.

Additionally, November also sees the Project Inquiry Index at 59.6, marking the 47th straight month in which inquiries into architectural services has been increasing.

“These are the strongest business conditions we have seen since the end of 2007 before the construction market collapse,” said AIA Chief Economist, Kermit Baker, PhD, Hon. AIA. “The real question now is if the federal budget situation gets cleared up which will likely lead to the green lighting of numerous projects currently on hold. If we do end up going off the ‘fiscal cliff’ then we can expect a significant setback for the entire design and construction industry.”

View the ABI highlights in greater detail, after the break…

Video: Glithero / Design Miami


Glithero are a progressive London-based practice made up of designers, Tim Simpson and Sarah van Gameren, who met and studied at the Royal College of Art. Their latest work, entitled ‘Lost Time’, was recently unveiled at Design . Created in collaboration with Perrier-Jouët, the installation takes inspiration from the Art Nouveau movement and a trip to the Champagne region of France, where they were invited into the Perrier-Jouet cellars in Epernay. In the past year Glithero has presented solo shows in London, Paris and Rotterdam, as well as exhibitions in Milan, Berlin and Basel. In 2011 the studio was shortlisted for the Brit Insurance Award and the Dutch Design Awards. Filming the installation, we gain an insight into its creation and into Glithero’s design ethos.

Despite Controversy, Michael Maltzan Architecture’s “Lens” Will Go On

Courtesy of

Despite petitions and pending lawsuits, the St. Petersburg City Council declared last night that Michael Maltzan Architecture‘s $50 million re-design of the city  will go on.

The project, known as “The Lens,” has hit speed-bumps due to local dissidents, who have been vocally wary of the new Pier’s price-tag/design and have called for a voter referendum. However, the architects have been sensitive to the process; since first winning the competition in January (beating out BIG and West 8), the firm has taken part in local workshops to get community input, making some significant changes to the original design.

After receiving local criticism that the Pier include more things “to do” and more shading, the firm has adjusted the design to include two restaurants, shaded balconies, and – in order to improve access – a road that can support service vehicles and a tram. Most noticeably, the plan for an underwater reef garden, the signature feature which gave the project its name, has had to be scratched: scientists have determined that a reef garden would be unrealistic with Tampa Bay’s dark water.

Last night’s 7-1 vote determined that the project will now receive funding in smaller, pre-approved increments in order to safeguard against potential legal complications. However, no mater the outcome, the closure and the demolition of the current Pier will take place between May and August 2013; if all goes to plan for Michael Maltzan Architecture, “The Lens” will open in summer 2015.

See updated Renderings for “The Lens,” and a really cool video, after the break…

Pinterest Round Up of Our Favorite Nap Time Retreats

Four-cornered Villa / Avanto Architects © Kuvio

If there is one thing that will make you crave a nap, it’s a feast. To help you through the post-meal hangover, we have complied some images of our favorite nap time retreats from Pinterest. Relax, enjoy and thank you for being an ArchDaily reader.

Continue after the break for all the images…

“Ai Weiwei: According to What?”

, Cube Light, 2008. Photo: Cathy Carver.

“Cube Light” has made it’s debut in D.C. at the Smithsonian’s Hirshhorn Museum, along with collection of Ai Weiwei most famous works in the retrospective “Ai Weiwei: According to What?”. Although one of China’s most prolific and provocative contemporary artists, Weiwei is best known in the world of architecture for his work with Herzog & de Meuron on Beijing’s famous “Bird’s Nest” and, most recently, the 2012 Serpentine Gallery Pavilion.

More images and information after the break…

Mayors Challenge Finalists Announced

’s Mayors Challenge

Twenty from across the U.S. are competing for nine million dollars in grant money that could fund their innovative solution to some of the major urban challenges that face our communities today. These Top 20 finalists were selected from 305 teams, formed by mayors, architects and local professionals, representing a city of 30,000 or more residents that responded to Mayor Bloomberg’s Mayors Challenge with a bold idea that could potentially make our government more efficient, solve a serious problem, or improve city life.

The five boldest ideas with the greatest potential for impact will win funding as well as national and local recognition. The winning city will receive a $5,000,000 grand prize and four other cities will receive $1,000,000 to help implement their ideas.

The Top 20 finalists are…

HNTB’s winning concept for LA’s 6th Street Viaduct Replacement Project

HNTB winning proposal via Sixth Street Viaduct Replacement Project

In April, Mayor Villaraigosa and City Council Member Huizar announced an international design competition to redesign the historic, 80-year-old Sixth Street Bridge in Los Angeles. The decision to launch the competition came after engineers warned that the bridge was at risk of failing during a major earthquake due to a degenerative structural problem known as “concrete cancer”. After careful consideration and entertaining the idea of constructing a replica of the 1932 icon, the city committed to moving forward with a major redesign. In mid-October, the national infrastructure firm HNTB, along with team members and , were announced as winners of the international competition.

Continue reading to learn more…

Video: Googie Architecture, Part 1

Googie Architecture, shared with us by Sunny & Mild Media, is part one of a series that encapsulates the futuristic design found prevalent in the post-war sprawl of Los Angeles during the 1950s. Popular among coffee shops, motels and gas stations, the ultramodern style originated from the Sunset Boulevard coffee shop, designed by , named Googies.  A Googie building was a symbol that a business was with the times, which in turn brought traffic and attention to its doors. Form followed function, and it’s function was advertisement.

For more, read Googie Architecture: Futurism through Modernism.

The Matchbox House / Bureau for Architecture and Urbanism

Steve Maylone © Maylone Photography

Architects: Bureau for Architecture and Urbanism
Location: ,, USA
Design Team: Naseem Alizadeh
Landscape Architect: Tad Krear
Year: 2012
Structural Engineer: Cory Johnston
Mechanical Engineer: Matt Snider
Photographs: Steve Maylone © Maylone Photography

VIDEO: New World Symphony / Frank Gehry by Cristobal Palma

Since its opening in January 2011 we have presented two articles related to this project designed by , home for the New World Symphony founded by renowned american director Michael Tilson Thomas. Today we have this great video that Cristobal Palma just shared with us, for a better understanding of the spaces and surroundings.

You can check some more videos by Cristobal Palma at ArchDaily:

Kengo Kuma lectures in San Diego and NYC this week!

Green Cast / Kengo Kuma & Associates

Tonight, Kengo Kuma will be lecturing at the Woodbury School of Architecture in at 6:30pm. Shortly following his Woodbury appearance, the Japanese architect will then make his way across the country to Columbia University’s GSAAP (Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation)Wood Auditorium in City to present his lecture, Minimize: Small Architecture after 3/11, on Wednesday the 10th at 6:30pm. Both lectures are free and open to the public.

City OKs design of Amazon’s Seattle Headquarters

© NBBJ

With a 3-2 vote, ’s Downtown Design Review Board has voted in favor of Amazon’s plans for a three-block, high-rise complex in the Denny Triangle. The board voted after conducting five, comprehensive meetings over the last six months to review Amazon’s evolving NBBJ-designed proposal. Although this design review approval is simply a recommendation to the city’s Department of Planning and Development, it is still a milestone for the ambitious project.

The five acre site, roughly located between Sixth Avenue, Blanchard Street and Westlake Avenue, is currently occupied by expansive parking lots, the Sixth Avenue Inn and the King Cat Theater. Continue after the break to learn more.

AIA Small Project Awards 2013 – Call for Entires

2012 Small Projects Award Recipient: SPECS Optical Façade, Minneapolis / Alchemy Architects © Geoffrey Warner and Scott Ervin

The Small Project Practitioners (SPP) Knowledge Community presents the ninth annual Small Project Award Program to recognize the work of small project practitioners and to promote excellence in small project design. This Award Program strives to raise public awareness of the value and design excellence that architects bring to all project types, including renovations and additions, no matter the limits of size and budget.

Award winning projects will be recognized in AIA publications and electronic media, including the SPP Journal and website. Projects will also be displayed at the 2013 AIA National Convention and Design Exposition. Select residential award winning projects will be included in Fine Homebuidling magazine’s annual awds issue, HOUSES, and on finehomebuilding.com.

Judging Criteria

Each entry will be judged for the success with which the project meets its individual program intent and requirements. Entries will be weighed individually, not in competition with each other. Criteria for judging will include the following:

  • The submission complies with all submission requirements
  • The project demonstrates exemplary skill in meeting program intent and requirements
  • The project achieves excellence in design

Award Categories

There are three built categories and one unbuilt category:

  • Category 1: A small project construction, object, work of environmental art or architectural design element up to $150,000.
  • Category 2: A small project construction, up to $1,500,000.
  • Category 3: A small project construction, object, work of environmental art, or architectural design under 5,000 SF constructed by the architect. The architect must have had a significant role in the construction, fabrication and/or installation of the work, in addition to being the designer.
  • Category 4: Unbuilt architectural designs under 5,000 SF for which there is no current intent to build, of all project types including purely theoretical, visionary projects, with or without a client.

Applicants may enter the same project in more than one category. The entry fee is on a per category basis (e.g. the same project entered in two categories will be charged two entry fees).

The Small Project Practitioners Knowledge Community encourages submissions of projects in all building types: commercial, retail, industrial, educational, public and private, as well as residential. In addition, projects may include fully completed new and renovations or elements of built projects. There is no limitation other than the quality of the final work. We invite the submission of projects accessible to people of all abilities. New construction and renovations are equally welcome.

Finally, the Small Project Practitioners Knowledge Community strongly encourages submissions from the many diverse Small Project Practitioner (SPP) members of the AIA and the profession.

Eligibility

  • Open to architects licensed in the United States.
  • Built projects completed after January 1, 2009.
  • Entry photography by the submitting architect is welcomed, but there is no restriction on professional photography.
  • Maximum of four entries per firm – (a single project may be entered in two different categories with applicable fees for each entry). Maximum of two unbuilt entries per firm.
  • No projects are permitted that have previously received a national AIA award.

Submissions

2013 Entries must be submitted before 4:59:59 p.m. Eastern Time on November 12, 2012.

The submission deadline date will be strictly observed; no exceptions will be made. No entry fee will be refunded for entries that are disqualified, late, or not completed. Payments and submissions will only be accepted online.

Notifications will be made to Award Recipients mid to late February 2013.

Please review the 2013 AIA Small Project Awards Walk Through and Concealed ID Forms before beginning your submission. When you are ready to submit, go to the Submission Website.

Fees

Built Projects (Categories 1, 2 and 3):

  • AIA members – $150 for each entry
  • Nonmembers – $300 for each entry

Unbuilt Designs (Category 4):

  • AIA members – $75 for each entry
  • Nonmembers – $150 for each entry

All entry fees are nonrefundable.

2013 Jury

  • Leonard Kady, AIA (Chair) – Leonard Kady Architecture + Design – , NY
  • Julie Beckman – KBAS – Philadelphia, PA
  • Christopher Herr, AIA – Studio H:T – Boulder, CO
  • Laura Kraft, AIA – Laura Kraft Architect – , WA
  • Rob Yagid – Fine Homebuilding magazine – Newtown, CT

Check out the recipients of the 2012 Small Project Awards here