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WELL Building Certification - An Architectural Aid for Human Health

14:00 - 12 March, 2017
WELL Building Certification - An Architectural Aid for Human Health, Symantec HQ - The building features a blend of natural materials, bold colouring, and branding. Image Courtesy of Little
Symantec HQ - The building features a blend of natural materials, bold colouring, and branding. Image Courtesy of Little

Architecture continually evolves to meet societal demands. Recently, a global effort to tackle climate change, and to achieve optimum energy efficiency in buildings, has brought standards such as BREEAM and LEED to the fore. However, as scientific analysis and awareness of human mental health has increased, architects are once again required to place humans at the centre of the design process. This growing trend has led to the development of WELL Building Certification – considered the world’s first certification focused exclusively on human health and wellbeing.

Symantec HQ - Staff interaction is encouraged as part of WELL standards. Image Courtesy of Little Symantec HQ - A vibrant collection of spaces encourage movement. Image Courtesy of Little Symantec HQ - Staff movement and interaction is encouraged to promote wellbeing. Image Courtesy of Little Symantec HQ - The building has achieved WELL certification. Image Courtesy of Little +16

PLP Architecture’s Proposed Office Building Responds to London’s Historic Urban Identity

14:00 - 5 February, 2017
PLP Architecture’s Proposed Office Building Responds to London’s Historic Urban Identity , © Luxigon
© Luxigon

Amongst the rapid materializing of telecoms, media and tech companies within the Blackfriar’s Southbank region, PLP Architecture has been chosen for the design of a new office building with the challenge of successfully integrating into the ever-changing local fabric.

“Our proposal speculates on the nature of the contemporary office tower,” explained the firm. “What is the architectural expression of today’s high-density workplace? How does the building acquire an identity specific to its media/tech occupiers and how is that identity conveyed to the city?”

The Record Company Headquarters that Revived 1950s Hollywood with Iconic Architecture

09:30 - 28 January, 2017
Courtesy of TASCHEN
Courtesy of TASCHEN

This essay by Alan Hess about the iconic Capitol Records building in Los Angeles was originally published as "The Architecture of the Capitol Records Tower." It is part of the book 75 Years of Capitol Records, published by TASCHEN, which is scheduled for release in February.

The president of Capitol Records was certain that a serious company could not operate out of a building that looked like the stack of records in a jukebox. So when Welton Becket, the new headquarters’ architect, showed him a model of the multistoried circular tower, Wallichs was annoyed. It would look like an advertising gimmick, Wallichs said, in a city where hot dogs were sold out of buildings shaped like hot dogs. Becket countered that the circular floor plan was more cost-efficient for the amount of usable space than a standard rectangular office building. Unimpressed, Wallichs told Becket to go back and design a conventional building.

The myth that a stack of records inspired the Tower has never died, though. As soon as the building opened, Hollywood columnist Bob Thomas wrote about it as “a monstrous stack of records.” Wallichs went on a public offensive from the start: “There was no intentional relationship between the shape of phonograph records and the circular design of the Tower” he insisted to the Chicago Tribune.

10 Architecture Offices with Inspiring Workspaces

08:00 - 17 January, 2017

The spaces in which great architecture firms produce their work are a source of endless curiosity for architects. By understanding these workspaces, architects hope to understand the environment in which their favorite ideas and drawings are shaped, and gain a more intimate understanding of their favorite practices. For this reason, we have searched our archives for the architectural offices that have previously been published on our website. Among our selection are international names such as MVRDV and Selgas Cano alongside other offices which, though not so well known, also demonstrate how your workspace can be a source of inspiration for design.

See the offices after the break. 

Nabil Gholam Wins 2016 World Architecture Festival with Bank Headquarters

08:00 - 4 December, 2016
Nabil Gholam Wins 2016 World Architecture Festival with Bank Headquarters, © nabil gholam architects
© nabil gholam architects

Nabil Gholam Architects' unbuilt proposal for a future bank headquarters competition, a.spire, has been named the winner of the Office-Future project category at World Architecture Festival 2016. The project, designed for the Mar Mikhael neighborhood of Beirut, Lebanon, is a flexible intervention meant to both meet the client's needs in the present day and adapt to its long-term evolution.

© nabil gholam architects © nabil gholam architects © nabil gholam architects © nabil gholam architects +13

42 Sketches, Drawings and Diagrams of Desks and Architecture Workspaces

08:30 - 3 October, 2016
42 Sketches, Drawings and Diagrams of Desks and Architecture Workspaces

Last month we put out a call to our readers to show us where they work. It was a pleasure to receive so many submissions, each showing the particular talent and creativity--and, the incredible geographical scope--of the ArchDaily community. These are our favorites (in no particular order). Enjoy and submit your own drawing in the comments. 

Zaha Hadid Architects' Antwerp Port House Photographed by Laurian Ghinitoiu

09:15 - 23 September, 2016
Zaha Hadid Architects' Antwerp Port House Photographed by Laurian Ghinitoiu, © Laurian Ghinitoiu
© Laurian Ghinitoiu

Zaha Hadid Architects' new Port House in the Belgian city of Antwerp, which has been almost a decade in planning and construction, officially opens this week. A monumental new structure sits above a repurposed and renovated (formerly derelict) fire station, providing a new headquarters for Europe's second largest shipping port. Housing 500 staff, who will now be under the same roof for the first time, the building represents a sustainable and future-proof workplace for its employees. Photographer Laurian Ghinitoiu has visited to capture his unique perspective on this new addition to the city's crane-covered skyline.

© Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu +42

CetraRuddy Designs Tallest Building in New York's Meatpacking District

08:00 - 27 July, 2016
CetraRuddy Designs Tallest Building in New York's Meatpacking District, Courtesy of CetraRuddy
Courtesy of CetraRuddy

CetraRuddy has been selected to design a new 18-story office building in Manhattan’s trendy Meatpacking District. With plans filed before zoning ordinances in the area changed the height limit to 130 feet, the project will feature an extra 140 feet, with a total height of 270 feet. 

Located on West 15th Street near Ninth Avenue, the office building—which was previously designed as a hotel—will connect to a landmark district building on West 14th Street, which will be renovated as a part of the project. Together, the two buildings will feature 250,000 square feet of office space with a landscaped rooftop and an additional five terraces for communal work and relaxation areas. 

Courtesy of CetraRuddy Courtesy of CetraRuddy Courtesy of CetraRuddy Courtesy of CetraRuddy +8

How WeWork Experiments On Itself to Advance the Field of Office Design

10:23 - 12 July, 2016
How WeWork Experiments On Itself to Advance the Field of Office Design, The potted plants, images of trees on the giant light fixtures from Alex Allen Studio, and even a show tree help people make a connection to nature at work, which creative director Devin Vermeulen says is “proven to make people more creative, less stressed”. Image © Lauren Kallen
The potted plants, images of trees on the giant light fixtures from Alex Allen Studio, and even a show tree help people make a connection to nature at work, which creative director Devin Vermeulen says is “proven to make people more creative, less stressed”. Image © Lauren Kallen

In this article, originally published by Metropolis Magazine as "Redefining (and Redesigning) The Way WeWork," Anne Quito visits WeWork's offices in New York to discover how the company is using its own headquarters as the test bed for its future product offering.

In a nondescript building in New York’s Chelsea neighborhood, the global headquarters of WeWork buzzes with creative energy. In just a little over six years, the start-up at the forefront of the coworking-space rental boom has created a $16 billion operation with 50,000 members in 28 cities, with 96 locations announced for this year.

Spread across two and a half floors, the 50,000-square-foot headquarters is the home base for WeWork’s almost-700-strong New York–based staff and serves as a laboratory for its designers.

WeWork’s designers think of the giant staircase that connects three floors of its headquarters as a series of occasional meeting spaces, but also as a kind of indoor park. Image © Lauren Kallen Gathering spaces at WeWork’s headquarters offer a wide range of options in terms of informality and noise levels. The café tends to be fairly energetic. Image © Lauren Kallen The in-house recording studio has a contemporary flair. Image © Lauren Kallen Every WeWork location has some local element; the headquarters has a mural featuring a timeline of New York musicians—from rock and roll to hip-hop—along a narrow corridor. Image © Lauren Kallen +7

schmidt hammer lassen Designs Mixed-Use Development in Central Stockholm

06:00 - 15 March, 2016
schmidt hammer lassen Designs Mixed-Use Development in Central Stockholm, Courtesy of schmidt hammer lassen architects
Courtesy of schmidt hammer lassen architects

Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects has won the international competition to design a new mixed-use development in the heart of Stockholm, Sweden: Hästen 21. The new development will comprise retail, office and residential spaces, creating a “central artery” for the area with a strong visual presence adapted to the history and skyline of the existing city.

U.D. Urban Design AB and SelgasCano Unveil Winning Proposal for New Planning Offices in Stockholm

06:00 - 1 March, 2016
U.D. Urban Design AB and SelgasCano Unveil Winning Proposal for New Planning Offices in Stockholm, Rendered Main Entrance View. Image Courtesy of Urban Design AB & SelgasCano
Rendered Main Entrance View. Image Courtesy of Urban Design AB & SelgasCano

U.D. Urban Design AB and SelgasCano have won an international, invited competition to design the new Planning and Administrative Offices for the city of Stockholm, Sweden. Their project, "Drivhus” (Danish for "Greenhouse”) will be located south of the Stockholm city center in Söderstaden, an area set for redevelopment.

Foster Breaks Ground on New Dubai Skyscraper

14:00 - 26 January, 2016
Foster Breaks Ground on New Dubai Skyscraper, © Foster + Partners
© Foster + Partners

Construction is underway on a new office and retail tower in the Dubai International Financial Center district (DIFC). Designed by Foster + Partners, the 1.5-million-square-foot "ICD Brookfield Place" has officially broke ground and is expected to be completed by late 2018. 

"The beginning of construction at ICD Brookfield Place marks the next phase of one of Dubai's most prestigious developments at the DIFC. We were honored to be chosen by ICD Brookfield to design a project that we believe will become a new social focus for Dubai, combining world class office space with a major civic plaza," says Foster. 

7 Buildings That Show Norman Foster's Architecture Has Always Been Ahead of the Curve

09:31 - 22 September, 2015
7 Buildings That Show Norman Foster's Architecture Has Always Been Ahead of the Curve, Aerial View of Spaceport America. Image © Nigel Young
Aerial View of Spaceport America. Image © Nigel Young

If Norman Foster were a household item, he would surely be a Swiss Army Knife. Foster, who turned 80 this year, is unrelenting in producing architectural solutions to problems that other architects can only theorize - just last Wednesday, for example, his firm released their design for a previously-unheard-of building typology, a droneport in Rwanda.

It is surprising then to find the man or his eponymous firm Foster + Partners absent from a list like Fast Company’s “The World's Top 10 Most Innovative Companies in Architecture,” organized into superlatives: MMA Architects, “for thinking outside the big box,” Heatherwick Studio, “for reimagining green space,” or C.F. Møller Architects, “for rethinking high-rise living.” This is not to say that Foster or his firm should be substituted for any of these deserved accolades, but rather that for five decades Foster and his firm have ceaselessly worked to enhance and expand on the human experience with architectural solutions that are both inventive and practical - a fact that is perhaps lost as a result of his position within the architectural establishment.

With that in mind, we thought it was worth highlighting the many occasions over the decades where Foster + Partners has shown themselves to be among the world's most innovative practices. Read on for more.

Ground Level View of Lunar Habitation. Image Courtesy of Foster + Partners Interior Concourse of Chek Lap Kok Airport. Image Courtesy of Flickr CC user Jorge Láscar Hearst Tower. Image © Chuck Choi Aerial View of Willis Faber and Dumas Headquarters. Image © Wikimedia CC user Mato zilincik +14

The Long(ish) Read: Louis Sullivan Discusses the Tall Office, "Artistically Considered"

04:00 - 10 September, 2015
The Long(ish) Read: Louis Sullivan Discusses the Tall Office, "Artistically Considered", Wainwright Building / Adler & Sullivan. Image Courtesy of Historic American Buildings Survey
Wainwright Building / Adler & Sullivan. Image Courtesy of Historic American Buildings Survey

Welcome to the second installment of The Long(ish) Read: an AD feature which uncovers texts written by notable essayists that resonate with contemporary architecture, interior architecture, urbanism or landscape design. In this essay, written in March 1896, Louis H. Sullivan (1856-1924) discusses the construction of high-rise office buildings. Sullivan, often described as the 'Father of Skyscrapers' and the 'Father of Modernism', was a mentor to a number of US architects in and around Chicago — including Frank Lloyd Wright and the Prairie School. In this essay, written when he was forty years of age, Sullivan lists his solutions to the many problems associated with building tall, and doing so with a degree of artistic flair.

Read the essay in full after the break.

Bati_rieul / L'EAU design

19:00 - 22 June, 2015
Bati_rieul / L'EAU design, © Park Wan-soon
© Park Wan-soon

© Park Wan-soon © Park Wan-soon © Park Wan-soon © Park Wan-soon +28

  • Architects

  • Location

    9-12 Cheongdam-dong, Gangnam-gu, Seoul, South Korea
  • Architect in Charge

    Kim Dong-jin
  • Design Team

    Jeong Sunjun, Kim Taeyeon
  • Area

    743.0 sqm
  • Project Year

    20058
  • Photographs

Head Office of AGC Glass Europe / SAMYN and PARTNERS

09:00 - 22 June, 2015
Head Office of AGC Glass Europe / SAMYN and PARTNERS, © Simon Schmitt
© Simon Schmitt

© Serge Brison © Serge Brison © Marie-Françoise Plissart © Marie-Françoise Plissart +61

IGN and Meteo France Geosciences Center / Architecture Patrick Mauger

13:00 - 14 June, 2015
IGN and Meteo France Geosciences Center  / Architecture Patrick Mauger, © Michel Denancé
© Michel Denancé

© Michel Denancé © Michel Denancé © Michel Denancé © Michel Denancé +28

AECOM's Basketball Training Facility Encases a Diverse Range of Program in LA

14:00 - 13 June, 2015
AECOM's Basketball Training Facility Encases a Diverse Range of Program in LA, Courtesy of AECOM LA Design Studio
Courtesy of AECOM LA Design Studio

AECOM has designed a $42,000,000 campus and training facility for a professional basketball organization in West Los Angeles. The building contains a basketball arena, corporate headquarters, a hall of fame, and gardens, among other programs. Despite the building’s varied uses, AECOM was determined to make it “basketball centric.”

Courtesy of AECOM Courtesy of AECOM LA Design Studio Interior Court Render / AECOM LA Design Studio Courtesy of AECOM LA Design Studio +13