Escobedo Soliz Studio Wins MoMA PS1's 2016 Young Architects Program

14:19 - 1 February, 2016
Escobedo Soliz Studio Wins MoMA PS1's 2016 Young Architects Program, Weaving the Courtyard, 2015. Image © Escobedo Soliz Studio
Weaving the Courtyard, 2015. Image © Escobedo Soliz Studio

Mexico City-based Escobedo Soliz Studio has been named the winner of MoMA and MoMA PS1's annual Young Architects Program (YAP) in New York - now in its 17th edition. Selected over four other finalists, the winning project, Weaving the Courtyard is “neither an object nor a sculpture standing in the courtyard, but a series of simple, powerful actions that generate new and different atmospheres," says the architect. It will serve as a "temporary urban landscape" for the 2016 Warm Up summer music series in MoMA PS1’s outdoor courtyard.

"Weaving the Courtyard is a site-specific architectural intervention using the courtyard’s concrete walls to generate both sky and landscape, with embankments in which platforms of soil and water suggest the appearance of a unique topography," says MoMA.

2016 YAP P.S.1 Shortlist

11:55 - 2 December, 2015
2016 YAP P.S.1 Shortlist, COSMO - 2015 winner of MoMA PS1's YAP. Image © Office for Political Innovation
COSMO - 2015 winner of MoMA PS1's YAP. Image © Office for Political Innovation

MoMA P.S.1 has announced five finalists to compete in the 2016 Young Architects Program (YAP). Now in it’s 16th edition, the competition will challenge a group of emerging architects to design a temporary installation within the walls of the P.S.1 courtyard for MoMA’s annual summer “Warm-Up” series.

The 2016 shortlist includes First Office / Andrew Atwood + Anna Neimark (Los Angeles, CA); ESCOBEDO + SOLIZ / Lazbent Pavel Escobedo Amaral + Andres Soliz Paz (Mexico City, Mexico); ULTRAMODERNE / Yasmin Vobis + Aaron Forrest (Providence, RI); COBALT OFFICE / Andrew Colopy and Robert Booth (Houston, TX); and Frida Escobedo (Anzures, Mexico). The winners will be announced in early 2016. 

Previous winners include COSMO (Andrés Jaque), The Living (Hy-Fi), CODA (Party Wall), Interboro Partners (Holding Pattern), Work AC (Public Farm 1), MOS (Afterparty) and SO-IL (Pole Dance).

MoMA Appoints Sean Anderson as Associate Curator of Architecture and Design

14:00 - 1 December, 2015
MoMA Appoints Sean Anderson as Associate Curator of Architecture and Design, Sean Anderson, Associate Curator, Department of Architecture and Design. Image © The Museum of Modern Art, NY
Sean Anderson, Associate Curator, Department of Architecture and Design. Image © The Museum of Modern Art, NY

The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) has appointed Sean Anderson as the new Associate Curator in the Department of Architecture and Design. Under the direction of Chief Curator Martino Stierli, Anderson will be responsible for "overseeing MoMA's Issues in Contemporary Architecture exhibition series, assisting in curatorial supervision of the Young Architects Program (YAP) both at MoMA PS1 and with international partners, and serving as the primary liaison to architecture communities both locally in New York as well as globally." His appointment is now effective. 

Andrés Jaque Cleans New York's Water with COSMO

14:14 - 26 June, 2015

A photo posted by Andrés Jaque (@andres_jaque) on

This week COSMO begun its venture to filter more than 42,000 gallons of New York City water during the course of MoMA PS1's Summer Warm Up series. The 16th installation built as part of the annual Young Architect's Program (YAP), COSMO is a portable water purifier designed by Andrés Jaque / Office for Political Innovation to combat the world's clean water crisis while serving an animated backdrop to PS1's party atmosphere. 

An interview with Jaque, after the break.

How MoMA PS1 Yap Winner Andrés Jaque Plans to Politicize Water

09:30 - 9 March, 2015
How MoMA PS1 Yap Winner Andrés Jaque Plans to Politicize Water, Courtesy of Office for Political Innovation
Courtesy of Office for Political Innovation

In the grand tradition of MoMA PS1's Young Architects Program winners, Andrés Jaque's plan for "COSMO" addresses an ecological need through installation architecture. While 2014's "Hy-Fi" by the living explored organic bricks and 2012's "Wendy" by HWKN addressed airborne pollution, Jaque has set his targets on something that is apparently much more political: water. This article, originally published by Metropolis Magazine as "The Politics of Water: Andrés Jaque on His 2015 MoMA PS1 YAP Winning Design," examines how Jaque hopes to turn his installation into a political talking point.

At first glance, Bill Gates’s robotic Janicki Omniprocessor and Andrés Jaque’s winning proposal for the 2015 MoMA PS1 Young Architects Program (YAP) share a similar goal—they each tackle the problem of global water scarcity, which has become exacerbated by climate change, political strife, and a host of other factors. But while the Omniprocessor looks like a cement factory in miniature, Jaque’s project melds its profoundly social objective—to change the way we understand contemporary water infrastructure—to an almost psychedelic aesthetic.  

MoMA PS1 YAP 2015 Runner-up: Roof Deck / Erin Besler

17:00 - 8 March, 2015
MoMA PS1 YAP 2015 Runner-up: Roof Deck / Erin Besler, Courtyard during warm-up. Image Courtesy of Erin Besler
Courtyard during warm-up. Image Courtesy of Erin Besler

Despite Andrés Jaque of Office of Political Innovation emerging as the winner of the 2015 MoMA PS1 Young Architects Program (YAP), his competitors put up quite a fight. One of this year's five shortlisted proposals, Erin Besler's Roof Deck breathes life into arguably the most overlooked aspect of architecture - the roof - by injecting it with an active public program and making it a vessel for summer celebration. 

Read on after the break for more on Besler's proposal.

Site Model. Image by Walker Olesen Courtyard during warm-up. Image Courtesy of Erin Besler Roof programming area. Image by Walker Olesen Roof Deck during warm-up: night. Image Courtesy of Erin Besler +12

Andrés Jaque Named 2015 MoMA PS1 Young Architects Program (YAP) Winner

00:00 - 5 February, 2015
Andrés Jaque Named 2015 MoMA PS1 Young Architects Program (YAP) Winner, © Cosmo / Andrés Jaque/Office for Political Innovation
© Cosmo / Andrés Jaque/Office for Political Innovation

Andrés Jaque / Office for Political Innovation’s project COSMO has been selected by the Museum of Modern Art and MoMA PS1 as winner of Young Architects Program’s (YAP) 16th edition in New York. Scheduled to open in late June, just in time for MoMA PS1’s 2015 Warm Up summer music, COSMO will serve as a “moveable artifact” with a mission to provide clean water for the world’s population. 

“This year’s proposal takes one of the Young Architects Program’s essential requirements - providing a water feature for leisure and fun - and highlights water itself as a scarce resource,” said Pedro Gadanho, Curator in MoMA’s Department of Architecture and Design. “Relying on off-the-shelf components from agro-industrial origin, an exuberant mobile architecture celebrates water-purification processes and turns their intricate visualization into an unusual backdrop for the Warm Up sessions.”

Animal Printheads, Biomimicry and More: How Nature Will Shape the Built Environment of the Future

00:00 - 8 August, 2014
Animal Printheads, Biomimicry and More: How Nature Will Shape the Built Environment of the Future , © John Becker
© John Becker

Biomimicry is quickly emerging as one of the next architectural frontiers. New manufacturing processes such as 3D printing, coupled with the drive to make buildings more environmentally sustainable, have led to a wave of projects that are derived from natural phenomena or even constructed with biological materials. A recent example of this trend is “Hy-Fi,” this summer’s MoMA PS1 design that is constructed of organic and compostable eco-bricks. Other projects such as MIT Media Lab’s Silk Pavilion have taken biological innovation a step further by actually using a biometric construction processes - around 6,500 silkworms wove the Silk Pavilion's membrane. “Animal Printheads,” as Geoff Manaugh calls them in his article "Architecture-By-Bee and Other Animal Printheads," have already proven to be a viable part of the manufacturing process in art, and perhaps in the future, the built environment as well. But what happens when humans engineer animals to 3D print other materials?

The Living’s Hy-Fi, winning design of the 2014 Young Architects Program. The Museum of Modern Art and MoMAPS1. Image © The Living MIT Media Lab's Silk Pavilion. Image © Steven Keating Silkworms weaving MIT Media Lab's Silk Pavilion. Image © Steven Keating © John Becker +10

VIDEO: How The Living's Mushroom Tower Was Built

00:00 - 1 July, 2014

Our friends at The Creators Project have shared with us an awesome video of the latest MoMA PS1 installation: Hy-Fi. Designed by The Living, who have - in a fascinating move - recently been acquired by Autodesk, the tower's many organic, biodegradable bricks are grown from a mushroom root in five days, with no energy required and no carbon emissions. In fact, the tower will be composted after MoMA PS1's summer program is over. Learn more about this ingenious tower from the creator David Benjamin in the video above. And check out more images of the tower after the break.

© Andrew Nunes © Andrew Nunes © Andrew Nunes © Andrew Nunes +6

Hy-Fi, The Organic Mushroom-Brick Tower Opens At MoMA's PS1 Courtyard

00:00 - 27 June, 2014

Last night, the organic brick structure known as 'Hy-Fi' opened in the courtyard of MoMA's PS1 space in New York. Designed by David Benjamin of New York architects The Living, the tower was designed as part of MoMA's Young Architects Program, and its construction centers around the use of an innovative building material: organic, biodegradable bricks consisting of no more than farm waste and a culture of fungus that is grown to fit a brick-shaped mold.

Acting as the centerpiece for MoMA's Warm Up music festival on Saturdays throughout the Summer, the temporary structure will provide shade, seating and water until September 7th. Read on after the break for more on the design.

Arup Engineers Explain: How the MoMA PS1 YAP Winners Grew Ten Thousand Mushroom Bricks

01:00 - 26 June, 2014

This year's MoMA PS1's Young Architects Program opens tomorrow (you can see the schedule of events here). Find out how the innovative winning design (a tower of fungal bricks), by The Living's David Benjamin, was tested and built with this article, originally posted on  as "Engineering a mushroom tower".

Soft, spongy, and delicious on pizza, mushrooms have approximately as much to do with structural engineering as alligators or lawnmowers. Or so we thought, until architect David Benjamin of New York firm The Living walked into our offices with a brick grown from fungi.

This brick was the key to his concept for an entry to MoMA PS1’s Young Architects Program competition. Every year, the museum commissions a designer to build a centerpiece for its popular outdoor Warm Up concert series.

If architectural design competitions are where brave, innovative ideas rise to the top, The Living’s mushroom tower (official name: Hy-Fi) checked all the right boxes. In addition to the novelty factor, mushroom bricks offer a host of sustainability benefits. The raw materials needed to produce them — mushrooms and corn stalks (waste material from farms) that the spores feed on — are as eco-friendly as they come. Bricks can be grown in just five days, and the process produces no waste or carbon emissions. When the structure is taken down at the end of the summer, they can be composted and turned into fertilizer.

The Future of Brick: Biodegradable And Bacterial

00:00 - 27 May, 2014
The Future of Brick: Biodegradable And Bacterial, Biodegradable Brick Is The Featured Material In This Years MoMA PS1 Exhibit, But Is It Suitable For Housing? . Image © The Living
Biodegradable Brick Is The Featured Material In This Years MoMA PS1 Exhibit, But Is It Suitable For Housing? . Image © The Living

MoMA’s PS1 exhibit in Queens is a showcase for young architects with lofty ideas. This year’s winning firm “The Living” designed "Hi-Fy" - a biodegradable brick tower. Although the idea might seem far-fetched for housing, the idea is gaining traction. North Carolina start-up bioMason, recently won the Cradle to Cradle Product Innovation Challenge for their “biodegradable bricks.” So Kieron Monks at CNN had to ask the question, would you live in a house made of sand, bacteria or fungi? Find out the benefits of these modern bricks here.

MoMA PS1 YAP 2014 Runner-Up: Underberg / LAMAS

01:00 - 22 March, 2014
MoMA PS1 YAP 2014 Runner-Up: Underberg / LAMAS, Looking back from the stage to the barrel vault, the party's in full swing. Image © LAMAS
Looking back from the stage to the barrel vault, the party's in full swing. Image © LAMAS

Wouldn't it be nice to save a little cold for when it’s hot (and maybe a little warmth for when it’s cold)? This was the premise of LAMAS’s MoMA PS1 runner-up proposal, UnderbergUnderberg is an urban iceberg. Though it isn't a native New Yorker, it has adapted to its new home in New York City and its crevasses take on the form of the avenues and streets of the gridiron. 

Underberg was one of five proposals shortlisted for the annual MoMA PS1 Young Architect’s Program (YAP) competition, which was won by the Living’s compostable brick tower. More on this proposal, after the break...

AD Interviews CODA, MoMA PS1 YAP Winner 2013

01:00 - 24 June, 2013
 AD Interviews CODA, MoMA PS1 YAP Winner 2013, © Zachary Tyler Newton
© Zachary Tyler Newton

Starting this Saturday, the public will finally be able to admire the winner of this year's Young Architects Program - Party Wall - at the MoMA PS1 courtyard in Long Island City. Every Saturday this summer through September 7, Party Wall will be the multi-functional backdrop (at once wall, water feature, shading and seating storage device) for Warm Up 2013, an outdoor music series.

We spoke with Party Wall's designer, Caroline O'Donnell, principal of CODA, just this morning; she told us that although much has been made of Party Wall's ingenious material (skateboarding scraps) and multi-functionality, it's most important feature is it's referentiality to the urban language of Long Island City.As O'Donnell told us: "we started to understand the relationship between the wall and the other languages—Long Island City, the billboards, the graffiti. We realized we had entered into a dialogue with a bigger urban context."In fact, the wall itself is a legible sign - written in the shadow it forms.

Read our interview with O'Donnell on Party Wall's ingenious design, after the break...