In Conversation With Will Hunter, Director Of The New London School Of Architecture

Will Hunter, founder and director of the LSA. Image © Simon Harris

The great schools of architecture have been around since time immemorial, or at least that’s how it can often feel. In , a city particularly dense with institutions of this calibre, this is perhaps felt more acutely. How, then, do you develop an entirely new school in this tightly packed environment which has the potency and capacity to compete? Will Hunter, former executive editor of the -based Architectural Review, began a process to do just this with an article in 2012. Following this, he set up the ARFA—Alternative Routes For Architecture—in order to explore different models for architectural education, calling upon professionals and academics to contribute to a series of informal discussions.

“When the tuition fees in the UK escalated to around £9000 per year in 2013, it got me thinking about different models for architectural education,” Hunter recalls. The casual meetings held around this time gradually become more serious until, “at a certain point, we decided to test them: to make a school.” The project gathered momentum from that point on and now, two years later, the London School of Architecture (LSA) are preparing to take in their first ‘trailblazing cohort’ of postgraduate students.

Grimshaw to Masterplan Washington DC’s Union Station

Existing Washington Union Station. Image © beautifulcataya

Grimshaw Architects has been asked to collaborate with New York-based Beyer Blinder Belle on a $10 billion that will modernize Washington DC‘s 1913 Beaux Arts Union Station. Along with the potential to triple passenger capacity, the plan aims to make the station more accessible and efficient, while integrate a new three-million-square-foot, mixed-use development by Amtrak and Akridge over its rail tracks.

“Washington DC deserves a station that serves the region on a practical level whilst celebrating the gateway to the nation’s capital,” said Grimshaw partner Vincent Chang.

Shortlist Announced For 2015 RIBA London Awards

Shortlisted: Great James Street / Emrys Architects. Image © Alan Williams

A total of 68 buildings have been shortlisted for RIBA London 2015 Awards, featuring buildings by AHMM, dRMM, John McAslan + Partners and Grimshaw, to Níall McLaughlin Architects, Eric Parry Architects, and Rogers Stirk Harbour. Winning projects from last year included three Stirling Prize shortlisted projects, as well as another by Haworth Tompkins who ultimately took the prize in 2014 for the Everyman Theatre in Liverpool. All shortlisted buildings will now be assessed by a regional jury. Regional winners will then be considered for a RIBA National Award in recognition of their architectural excellence, the results of which will place some projects in the running for the 2015 RIBA Stirling Prize.

See the complete list of shortlisted projects after the break.

Grimshaw Receives Planning Approval for Phase Two of Belfast’s City Quays Masterplan

Courtesy of

Grimshaw Architects have received full planning approval for City Quays 2, the second building planned as part of their City Quays for Belfast Harbour’s Clarendon Dock. To be built on a former ferry terminal site, City Quays 2 will stretch nine stories high and provide over 95,000 square feet of flexible work space.

Andrew Burges Architects Wins Competition for Park and Aquatic Centre in Sydney’s Green Square

© Andrew Burges Architects via www.cityofsydney.nsw.gov.au

The City of Sydney has selected the team of Andrew Burges Architects working with Grimshaw and TCL, as the winners of a competition to design a new park and aquatic centre in Green Square, around 4 kilometres to the South of central . One of the city’s six “Major Development Zones,” the park and aquatic centre is part of a larger development in the centre of Green Square, with an adjacent site slated for a new public square and library.

Grimshaw Releases New Images of World’s Largest Airport Terminal in Istanbul

Courtesy of

New images have been released of Istanbul‘s new , designed by Grimshaw, Nordic Office of Architecture and Haptic Architects, assisted by local Turkish Partners GMW Mimarlik and Tekeli Sisa. Projected to be the world’s largest airport terminal under a single roof at almost one million square metres, the new airport is expected to serve 90 million passengers a year on the opening of the first phase, rising to 150 million a year after completion in 2018.

The Other “Green Way”: Why Can’t New York Build More Quality Affordable Housing?

© Flickr CC User Jules Antonio

This article originally appeared on uncube magazine as An Affordable Housing Complex in the Bronx Revisited.

Two years after the completion of and Dattner’s acclaimed Via Verde (“Green Way”), no successors have even been proposed for this supposed model for the design and construction of new affordable housing. In this article, David Bench returns to the site, finding that the sustainable project’s lack of impact is caused by a completely different type of ”green.”

is the quest of every New Yorker. The routes to finding it are mysterious and widely misunderstood, as they are made up of a myriad of buildings, programmes, and rules that have failed to keep pace with the production of luxury housing and gentrification of middle class neighbourhoods in the city. This apartment anxiety has led to such amusing and fateful reactions as the creation of the Rent is Too Damn High political party – whose name speaks for itself – and an economic narrative that propelled Bill de Blasio from a long-shot mayoral candidacy to an overwhelming majority on election day in 2013. Soon after taking office, de Blasio unveiled the most ambitious affordable housing program in generations, which aims to build or preserve 200,000 units in the next decade.

Grimshaw Selected to Expand Peru’s International Airport

Aeropuerto Internacional Jorge Chávez. Image Courtesy of LAP

Grimshaw has landed a $950 million project for the Jorge Chávez International Airport in Lima, Peru. As reported by the Architect’s Journal, Grimshaw will work with ARCADIS, CH2MHill and to design a seven million square meter scheme that will include a new air traffic control tower and second terminal for the international airport. Designs are set to be revealed in 2015.

When Architects Try Their Hand at Industrial Design

Getting locals involved helped Workshop to engender a sense of community in Tacloban as well as solve their practical problems. Image © Nelson Petilla

From Frank Lloyd Wright to Mies van der Rohe, many architects have dabbled in designing smaller-scale items. While some argue that industrial design is not an architect’s place, many would beg to differ. The following article, originally published on Design Curial, describes various architects involved with industrial design today.

Architects who take a break from the built environment and turn their attention to designing smaller items are most often driven – initially at least – by what they see as necessity. They struggle to find the right , signage or lighting for their interiors, and convince their client that they are the perfect people to design them.

Those architects quickly get a taste for the smaller scale then hunt down opportunities to design other items, in the hope that some may go into mass production. This is further fueled by those ‘big names’ who are approached by manufacturers to use their signature to brand the product. While there is a logic to this sequence of events, it still begs the question: why would anyone who can get commissioned to design a building bother with anything smaller?

Via Verde / Dattner Architects + Grimshaw Architects

© David Sundberg

Architects: Grimshaw Architects, Dattner Architects
Location: 700 Brook Avenue, Bronx, NY 10455,
Co Developers: Phipps Houses, Jonathan Rose Companies
Area: 294000.0 sqm
Year: 2012
Photographs: David Sundberg, Vanni Archive

Pulkovo International Airport / Grimshaw Architects + Ramboll + Pascall+Watson

Courtesy of Grimshaw Architects

Architects: Grimshaw Architects, Ramboll, Pascall+Watson
Location: Pulkovo Airport (LED), , Russia
Year: 2014
Photographs: Courtesy of Grimshaw Architects

Six of Britain’s Best Shortlisted for Crystal Palace Project

Aerial view of site for rebuild. Image Courtesy of ZhongRong Group

After an open competition that sought to attract “the very best British architecture can offer,” six architects – including Zaha Hadid and Richard Rogers – have been selected as the potential architects of the project to rebuild the Crystal Palace in south . See the full shortlist after the break.

Grimshaw to Design World’s Largest Terminal in Istanbul

. Image Courtesy of Grimshaw

Following a competitive interview process Grimshaw, in partnership with Nordic Office of Architecture, has been appointed by the Turkish consortium of Cengiz, Mapa, Limak, Kolin and Kalyon to design the terminal complex for Istanbul New Airport

Located on the Black Sea coast, some 35km outside of Istanbul, the ambitious six-runway development, masterplanned by Arup, will be delivered in four phases. The first phase will open in 2019 and aims to serve 90 million passengers per year. This will increase to 150 million passengers per annum once fully complete. The new will include the world’s largest terminal, with a gross floor area close to one million square meters.

Ecorium of the National Ecological Institute / Samoo Architects & Engineers + Grimshaw Architects

© Young Chae Park

Architects: Samoo Architects & Engineers, Grimshaw Architects
Location: Seocheon-gun, Korea
Area: 33090.0 sqm
Photographs: Young Chae Park

Three Projects Shortlisted for 2013 RIBA Lubetkin Prize

The RIBA has announced three projects—two located in Asia and one in the United States—for the shortlist of the RIBA’s Lubetkin Prize. Named for Berthold Lubetkin, a Georgian-born architect, the prize celebrates the work of RIBA members building outside of the . Zaha Hadid’s Galaxy Soho, Grimshaw’s Via Verde and Wilkinson Eyre’s Cooled Conservatories will face off for the honor; the winner of this year’s Lubetkin Prize will be announced (along with the winner of the prestigious Stirling Prize) on September 26th in London.

Angela Brady, RIBA President, said:

“The 2013 shortlist features three exceptionally innovative projects that meet three very different urban challenges. From the blueprint for New York affordable housing and the creation of an impressive new shopping district in central Beijing to Singapore’s new sustainable gardens, these are all extremely clever solutions. These cutting-edge schemes show the leading role that architects play in delivering visionary new thinking about urban issues, and illustrate why UK creative talent has such recognition around the world.”

More on the shortlisted projects after the break…

Aspire Mixed-Use Tower Proposal / Grimshaw Architects

Courtesy of Architects

Emerging from a design excellence competition held by the City Council, the Aspire Tower, designed by Grimshaw Architects, is a landmark mixed-use tower set to establish a new benchmark for innovative, passive-environmental design in Australian high-rise developments. Designed to act as a catalyst project for Parramatta Square, the tower provides high density, urban residential living which is not only affordable but also sustainable. More images and architects’ description after the break.

Patricia and Phillip Frost Museum of Science / Grimshaw Architects

Courtesy of Architects

Slated to open in 2015, the Patricia and Phillip Frost Museum of Science is on its way to become the world’s most innovative and sustainable science museum with the structural foundation now complete and the vertical construction currently in progress. Designed by , the 250,000 square-foot complex will harness energy from water, sun, wind and even museum visitors to power exhibits and conserve resources. More images and architects’ description after the break.

Queens Museum of Art Expansion / Grimshaw Architects

Courtesy of and the Queens Museum of Art

Originally constructed for the 1939 World’s Fair, the resilient structure of ’s Queens Museum of Art has been undergoing its fourth and most ambitious renovation since April 2011. This $68 million renovation, designed by Grimshaw Architects, will double the institution’s size, expanding the museum to a total of 105,000 square feet upon its completion in October 2013.