We’ve built you a better ArchDaily. Learn more and let us know what you think. Send us your feedback »

FAKT Creates a Floating Metal “Cloudscape” in Montpellier

FAKT, an up-and-coming studio based out of Berlin and Zurich, has created an architectural installation for the Festival des Architectures Vives, which uses perforated aluminum sheets to produce a cloudscape. Sponsored by metalworking companies Karl Dieringer and AMAG Austria Metall, the exhibition explores aluminum's material properties and its ability to create new forms.

Cloudscape Surface Contours. Image © Giulio Boem An Interior View of the Exhibition. Image © Giulio Boem Visitors Looking inside Cloudscape. Image © Giulio Boem Top of Cloudscape. Image © Giulio Boem

Richard Meier Designs Two-Tower Residential Development for Bogota

North View. Image Courtesy of Richard Meier & Partners
North View. Image Courtesy of Richard Meier & Partners

Richard Meier & Partners has unveiled designs for their first project in Bogota: Vitrvm. Conceptualized as two towers united at the base, the new 13-story residential development will provide 36 apartments along Septima Avenue in the north section of the city. 

“The project is contextually inspired by the beauty of its immediate surroundings,” described the architects. “It aims to reflect and to engage the beautiful gardens and large trees at the Chico Park and the Seminario Mayor,” one of the largest and most important seminaries in Colombia.

Richard Meier Unveils First Florida Beach Project, Now Underway

Richard Meier will be adding his mark to Greater Miami with the completion of a Four Season’s expansion to the historic Russell Pancoast-designed “Surf Club” in 2016, located in Surfside. Already under construction, the luxury hospitality and residential project will include two, 12-story residential towers, offering 150 private units, alongside an 80-room hotel on 9-acres of pristine oceanfront property. A members-only club, restaurants, spa and other amenities will be included on site, connected to each other via an expansive park and oceanside gardens. 

Richard Meier Unveils 180-Meter Tower Development in Mexico

Richard Meier & Partners has unveiled the “Reforma Towers,” a 40-story, mixed use development planned for Mexico City’s historic Paseo de la Reforma. Comprised of two high-rise towers, clad in Meier’s signature white concrete, the new development will bring high end office, hotel, and retail space, as well as restaurants and a fitness center to the city’s distinguished Boulevard upon completion in 2015. 

SDA + Volvo Collaborate to Create Portable Car-Charging Pavilion

After months of design refinement and engineering, Synthesis Design + Architecture (SDA), winners of the "Switch to Pure Volvo" architecture competition, have launched a free-standing mobile pavilion capable of harnessing solar energy to power the new Volvo V60, the world's first diesel plug-in hybrid car. The 'Pure Tension' Pavilion was birthed by SDA's extensive research on dynamic mesh relaxation, utilizing bendable, lightweight aluminum structures with flexible fabrics that can be stored in the trunk of the car and easily mounted within one hour, similar to a tent.

Design Miami Pavilion / formlessfinder

Each December, Design Miami/ commissions early-career architects to build a designed environment for the fair's entrance as part of its biannual Design Commissions program. This year's winning proposal, dubbed "Tent Pile," was designed by the New York-based architectural practice formlessfinder. Its design harnesses the properties of sand and aluminum to create shade, seating, cool air and a space to play for Miami's public.

AD Classics: The Dymaxion House / Buckminster Fuller

The Dymaxion House was a futuristic dwelling invented by the architect and practical philosopher R. Buckminister Fuller - who would have turned 118 today. The word “Dymaxion,” which combines the words dynamic, maximum and tension, was coined (among many others) by Fuller himself.

via www.trumanlibrary.org model via scene.org © MoMA © The Estate of R. Buckminster Fuller, via myipamm.net

The Zachary House / Stephen Atkinson Architecture

Site Plan; © Stephen Atkinson Architecture
Site Plan; © Stephen Atkinson Architecture

The story of the Zachary House, designed by Stephen Atkinson Architectureis one of idealism of the profession and faith to the design.  In three iterations, the house that was originally designed for Atkinson’s own parents went from being the incarnation of the architect’s own ideal image, revered by both modernists and traditionalists, to a highly protected “manuscript” of an architectural vision.  The house was originally built in the 90′s in Zachary, Louisiana, where it gained a substantial amount of attention from other residents and the media for its blend of the “dog trot” and “shotgun” style homes.  The house, now in its third life, was built under specific conditions that maintained every element of its distinctive design. Join us after the break to find out more.

Assembly One Pavilion / Yale School of Architecture Students

© Chris Morgan Photography
© Chris Morgan Photography

The Yale ‘Assembly One’ pavilion is the younger, smaller, more carefree sister to Yale’s building project – a 40-year old tradition in which first-year students design and building a house. It is the product of a seminar and design studio in which students focused on alternative ways in which contemporary buildings can come together and the potential architectural effects computational and material techniques can offer. The ‘Assembly One’ pavilion is designed to act as an information center for New Haven’s summer International Festival of Arts and Ideas and therefore was developed with the following characteristics in mind: dynamism, visual transparency and visual density. Continue after the break for more!

© Chris Morgan Photography © Chris Morgan Photography © Chris Morgan Photography © Chris Morgan Photography

picNYC Transforms Urban Dining

© Iwan Baan
© Iwan Baan

Haiko Cornelissen Architecten recently unveiled their picNYC table with a live grass table top.  Inspired by wave of urban farming initiatives, the picNYC takes this concept into the house at a micro level. A folded lightweight aluminum table top and legs provide the necessary structure to support the stone drainage bed, soil and grass. With the grass option, spilling water while dining no longer becomes an issue, but rather a necessity. However, should one require a finely groomed lawn on top, the grass will need to be cut by hand. Other options suitable for the picNYC include an endless opportunity for planting with a wide range of greenery ranging from flowers, to fruits and vegetables.

International Competition Winner of Government Building in Sejong City / Tomoon Architects & Engineers

main view rendering
main view rendering

The 3-1 Zone of Government Building in Sejong City is a symbolic gate of the central administration town. The Urban Gate, where nature and citizen are together, and the Urban Plaza, which anybody can freely use, are planned for here. It is designed as a comfortable and cozy resting place shaped after nature. It will be used for various events including festivals and various culture and art activities. In terms of urban scale, the linear shape of existing master plan had been maintained.

Olympic Sculpture Park / Weiss Manfredi

© Benjamin Benschneider
© Benjamin Benschneider

Envisioned as a new urban model for sculpture parks, this project is located on Seattle’s last undeveloped waterfront property – an industrial brownfield site sliced by train tracks and an arterial road. The design connects three separate sites with an uninterrupted Z-shaped “green” platform, descending forty feet from the city to the water, capitalizing on views of the skyline and Elliott Bay, and rising over existing infrastructure to reconnect the urban core to the revitalized waterfront.

© Benjamin Benschneider © Benjamin Benschneider © Paul Warchol © Benjamin Benschneider

Architects: Weiss/Manfredi Architecture/Landscape/Urbanism Location: Seattle, Washington, USA Project Team: Marion Weiss and Michael A. Manfredi (Design Partners), Christopher Ballentine (Project Manager), Todd Hoehn and Yehre Suh (Project Architects), Patrick Armacost, Michael Blasberg, Emily Clanahan, Lauren Crahan, Beatrice Eleazar, Kian Goh, Hamilton Hadden, Mike Harshman, Mustapha Jundi, Justin Kwok, John Peek, and Akari Takebayashi Structural and Civil Engineering Consultant: Magnusson Klemencic Associates Mechanical and Electrical Engineering Consultant: ABACUS Engineered Systems Lighting Design Consultant: Brandston Partnership Inc. General Contractor: Sellen Construction Geotechnical Engineering Consultant: Hart Crowser Environmental Consultant: Aspect Consulting Aquatic Engineering Consultant: Anchor Environmental Graphics Consultant: Pentagram Security and AV/IT Consultant: ARUP Catering & Food Service Consultant: Bon Appetit Kitchen Consultant: JLR Design Retail Consultant: Doyle + Associates Project Management: Barrientos LLC Architectural Site Representation: Owens Richards Architects Client: Seattle Art Museum Project Year: 2001-2007 Photographs: Benjamin Benschneider, Bruce Moore, Paul Warchol

North Carolina Museum of Art / Thomas Phifer and Partners

© Scott Frances
© Scott Frances

Architect: Thomas Phifer Location: Raleigh, North Carolina, USA Partner in Charge: Thomas Phifer AIA Project Partner: Greg Reaves AIA LEED AP Project Architect: Gabriel Smith AIA LEED AP Project Team: Adam Ruffin, Katie Bennett, Jonathan Benner, Eric Richey, Daniel Taft, Kerim Demirkan, Len Lopate, ChristophTimm, Joseph Sevene Local Architects: Pierce Brinkley Cease + Lee, Raleigh, NC Structural Engineer: Skidmore, Owings & Merrill LLP, Chicago, IL Mechanical Engineer: AltieriSeborWieber LLC, Norwalk, CT Landscape Architect: Lappas + Havener, PA, Durham, N.C. Lighting Design: Fisher Marantz Stone, New York, NY General Contractor: Barnhill, Raleigh NC Project Area: 136,000 sf Project Year: 2010 Photographs: Scott Frances

© Scott Frances © Scott Frances © Scott Frances © Scott Frances

Simmons Hall at MIT/ Steven Holl

© Andy Ryan - Steven Holl Architects
© Andy Ryan - Steven Holl Architects

When Massachusetts Institute of Technology commissioned Steven Holl in 1999 to design a new a dormitory for the school they had one goal in sight: that the spaces around and within the building would stir up interaction among students. While MIT focused on the building’s use and function, Holl aimed to create a memorable building. With MIT’s vision in mind along with Holl’s artistic architectural ideas, the ten-story undergraduate dormitory became a small city in itself with balancing opposing architectural elements, such as solids and voids and opaqueness and transparency. More on Simmons Hall after the break.