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INTERIORS: Stanley Kubrick

00:00 - 9 June, 2014
Courtesy of Mehruss Jon Ahi and Armen Karaoghlanian
Courtesy of Mehruss Jon Ahi and Armen Karaoghlanian

Interiors is an online film and architecture journal, published by Mehruss Jon Ahi and Armen KaraoghlanianInteriors runs an exclusive ArchDaily column analyzing and diagraming films in terms of space.

Stanley Kubrick has been called many things: pretentious, unpretentious, alienated, ambiguous, audacious, empty, disturbing, outrageous, devilish, soulless, patient, unflinching, impersonal, arrogant, calculated, paranoid, aloof, visionary, genius, tyrant, misogynist, cineaste, original, and in the immortal words of Kirk Douglas, a “talented shit.”

It’s interesting to note then, when asked about his film, 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968), Stanley Kubrick himself said, “It's not a message that I ever intend to convey in words.” The film itself is a “nonverbal experience.” There are no words – or dialogue – for more than two-thirds of the film. Stanley Kubrick is a visual storyteller; in his films, words are secondary.

From Touring With Skrillex to Building A Community: A Musician-Turned-Designer Builds "Beautiful Things"

00:00 - 9 June, 2014

Before starting down the arduous path of the life of a designer, those who have been there before you will insist on one thing: you must be passionate about what you do. Music brought Nathanael Balon to California, where he ended touring with his neighbor Sonny Moore (you probably know him as Skrillex). But 40 days into his second world tour he woke up wishing he were doing something else. Nathanael dreamed of building.

His desire to "build beautiful things" culminated in the creation of WoodSmithe, a company that designs and constructs retail environments, window displays and trade-show booths. Get a glimpse into Nathanael's courageous move in the short video above and read on to find out about a group of people who have made bold decisions to follow their dreams.



IM Pei Wins UIA Gold Medal for Lifetime Achievement

00:00 - 9 June, 2014
IM Pei Wins UIA Gold Medal for Lifetime Achievement, Courtesy of http://blog.newx.com/
Courtesy of http://blog.newx.com/

The International Union of Architects (UIA) has announced that it will award its Gold Medal to the Chinese born American architect and 1983 Pritzker Laureate, Ieoh Ming Pei.

By bestowing the most prestigious of the UIA's awards on Pei, whose “life and work spans the history of modern architecture over five continents for more than sixty years," the UIA recognizes "his unique style, his timeless rigor, and his spiritual connection to history, time and space.”

Pei will receive the UIA Gold Medal at the awards ceremony at the UIA World Congress of Architecture in Durban, South Africa on August 6th 2014.

© Pei Cobb Freed & Partners © Flickr: username- Andy961 © Anonymous Blogger Courtesy of Daniel Cooper - http://www.flickr.com/photos/doitintheroad/ +5

Alianza Francesa Jean Mermoz School / Guillermo Hevia García + Nicolás Urzúa Soler

01:00 - 9 June, 2014
Alianza Francesa Jean Mermoz School / Guillermo Hevia García  + Nicolás Urzúa Soler, © Nico Saieh
© Nico Saieh

© Nico Saieh © Nico Saieh © Nico Saieh © Nico Saieh +41

Mercedes House In Garden City / CREUSeCARRASCO Arquitectos

01:00 - 9 June, 2014
Mercedes House In Garden City / CREUSeCARRASCO Arquitectos, © Raul Lamoso
© Raul Lamoso

© Héctor Santos Courtesy of CREUSeCARRASCO Arquitectos © Héctor Santos © Raul Lamoso +26

Glass-Walled Labyrinth / Robert Morris

01:00 - 9 June, 2014
Glass-Walled Labyrinth / Robert Morris, © Josh Ferdinand
© Josh Ferdinand

© Josh Ferdinand © Josh Ferdinand © Josh Ferdinand © Josh Ferdinand +7

Lone Outdoor Pools / 3LHD

01:00 - 9 June, 2014
Lone Outdoor Pools / 3LHD, © Siniša Gulić
© Siniša Gulić

© Joao Morgado © Siniša Gulić © Siniša Gulić © Siniša Gulić +22

Doubts Over Qatar's World Cup Future Causing Tension Among Architects

00:00 - 9 June, 2014
Doubts Over Qatar's World Cup Future Causing Tension Among Architects, Foster + Partners' design for the 'Lusail Iconic Stadium' which formed part of Qatar's initial bid.. Image © Foster + Partners
Foster + Partners' design for the 'Lusail Iconic Stadium' which formed part of Qatar's initial bid.. Image © Foster + Partners

An expert on the Middle Eastern construction industry has said that architects working in Qatar are worried about the future of their projects, following the allegations sparked by a Sunday Times report last week of corruption during the country's 2022 World Cup bid. With many people calling for Qatar to be stripped of the event or for the bidding process to be re-run, there is a chance that Qatar might have to pull the plug on many of its major projects.

Speaking to the Architects' Journal  Richard Thompson, the Editorial Director of the Middle East Economics Digest, said "A lot of people out here are watching it nervously."

Read on for more of the comments made by Thompson

Gehry's Berlin Skyscraper May Be Too Heavy for Alexanderplatz

00:00 - 9 June, 2014
Gehry's Berlin Skyscraper May Be Too Heavy for Alexanderplatz, Gehry Partners' winning design for the residential building on Alexanderplatz. Image © Gehry Partners, Courtesy of Hines
Gehry Partners' winning design for the residential building on Alexanderplatz. Image © Gehry Partners, Courtesy of Hines

After winning the design competition for Germany's tallest apartment tower in January, Frank Gehry's project for the building on Alexanderplatz has already run into problems over fears that the 150-metre building could be too heavy for its site. The German edition of the Local is reporting that Berlin's Senate has placed the plans on hold because of the building's proximity to the U5 branch of the U-Bahn tunnel, which it fears could be crushed under the weight.

More on the story after the break

MoyaMoya / Fumihiko Sano

01:00 - 9 June, 2014
MoyaMoya / Fumihiko Sano, © Daisuke Shimokawa /Nacása&Partners Inc
© Daisuke Shimokawa /Nacása&Partners Inc

© Daisuke Shimokawa /Nacása&Partners Inc © Daisuke Shimokawa /Nacása&Partners Inc © Daisuke Shimokawa /Nacása&Partners Inc © Daisuke Shimokawa /Nacása&Partners Inc +39

Unit T2 for Goodman / MAKE Creative

01:00 - 9 June, 2014
Unit T2 for Goodman / MAKE Creative, © Luc Remond
© Luc Remond

© Luc Remond © Luc Remond © Luc Remond © Luc Remond +11

Charles Moore: Going Against the Grain

01:00 - 8 June, 2014
Charles Moore: Going Against the Grain, A portrait of Moore, who was always more interested in how people moved through spaces­—and the resulting fragmentary views—­than a single beauty shot. Image Courtesy of Charles Moore Foundation
A portrait of Moore, who was always more interested in how people moved through spaces­—and the resulting fragmentary views—­than a single beauty shot. Image Courtesy of Charles Moore Foundation

“Who threw this tantrum?” This question sums up how Charles Moore’s peers reacted when they saw his Lovejoy Fountain project for the first time. Moore was always a bit unconventional by contemporary standards – he designed what others would not dare, creating a body of work that alludes to everything from Italian baroque forms to Mexican folk art colors to Japanese wood construction. Originally published as Why Charles Moore (Still) Matters on Metropolis Magazine, check out Alexandra Lange’s thoughtful piece on the influential architect after the break.

“Stop work. It looks like a prison.” That was the telegram from the developers in response to Moore Lyndon Turnbull Whitaker’s (MLTW) first design for the Sea Ranch, which celebrates its 50th anniversary this year. Architects Charles Moore, Donlyn Lyndon, William Turnbull, and Richard Whitaker, working with landscape architect Lawrence Halprin, had used sugar cubes to model the 24-foot module for each of the condominium’s original ten units. And that boxy choice, combined with the simplest of windows and vertical redwood siding, produced something more penitentiary than vacation (it’s sited on a choice stretch of Sonoma coast). 

Moore's wacky bedframe in his New Haven home, complete with trompe l’oeil dome overhead. Image Courtesy of Metropolis Magazine Designed in 1978, the Piazza d’Italia was built to honor the Italian American community in New Orleans. It was done in collaboration with Arthur Andersson, Steven Bingler, Allen Eskew, Ronald Filson and Malcolm Heard. Image Courtesy of Metropolis Magazine Barbara Stauffacher Solomon painted highly influential supergraphics inside the Swim Club, further altering perceptions of its small scale. In subsequent projects, Moore often worked with Tina Beebe to select interior color arrangements. Image Courtesy of Jim Alinder / Princeton Architectural Press Moore in the backyard of his New Haven home, late 1960s. He took a traditional clapboard house and poked holes through it, including this glassy rear extension. Image Courtesy of Charles Moore Foundation +10

New Harvard GSD Class Asks: Are Competitions Worth It?

00:00 - 8 June, 2014
New Harvard GSD Class Asks: Are Competitions Worth It?, BIG's 2009 render for the National Library in Astana, Kazakhstan, which was never built. Image © BIG-Bjarke Ingels Group
BIG's 2009 render for the National Library in Astana, Kazakhstan, which was never built. Image © BIG-Bjarke Ingels Group

For small firms, design competitions can often feel like a Catch22 - enter and lose precious time and resources (usually for nothing) or avoid them - at the risk of losing out on the "big break." Now a new class at Harvard's Graduate School of Design takes on just this quandary, as well as the many other practical, theoretical, and moral implications of architectural competitions for the profession. Learn more at this article at the Harvard Gazette.

5 Awesome AutoCAD Tricks

00:00 - 8 June, 2014
5 Awesome AutoCAD Tricks, Courtesy of CADline
Courtesy of CADline

Do you get excited when you discover a game-changing command on AutoCAD? Don't worry, us too - which is why we're recommending five AutoCAD YouTube tutorials selected by Line//Shape//Space. To learn something new (like importing point cloud data or searching for text within your drawings), or just to brush up on your skills, click here.

School in Vilaflor / TECHNE

01:00 - 8 June, 2014
School in Vilaflor  / TECHNE, Courtesy of TECHNE
Courtesy of TECHNE

Courtesy of TECHNE Courtesy of TECHNE Courtesy of TECHNE Courtesy of TECHNE +24

  • Architects

  • Location

    38613 Vilaflor, Santa Cruz de Tenerife, Spain
  • Architect in Charge

    José Manuel Rodríguez Peña
  • Engineer

    Nelson Hernández Dorta
  • Project Year

    2014
  • Photography

    Courtesy of TECHNE

LLAMA / KILO + BIG

01:00 - 8 June, 2014
LLAMA /  KILO  + BIG, Courtesy of BIG
Courtesy of BIG

Courtesy of BIG Courtesy of BIG Courtesy of BIG Courtesy of BIG +15

  • Architects

  • Location

    Copenhagen, Denmark
  • Architects in Charge

    Lars Larsen (KILO), Jakob Lange (BIG)
  • Project Year

    2014
  • Photographs

    Courtesy of BIG

Terminal da Lapa / Núcleo de Arquitetura

01:00 - 8 June, 2014
© Nelson Kon
© Nelson Kon
  • Architects

  • Location

    Rua Guaicurus - Água Branca, São Paulo, Brazil
  • Architect in Charge

    Luciano Margotto, Marcelo Ursini, Sérgio Salles
  • Area

    7015.0 sqm
  • Project Year

    2003
  • Photographs

© Nelson Kon © Nelson Kon © Nelson Kon © Nelson Kon +24

Unified Architectural Theory: Chapter 5

00:00 - 8 June, 2014
Unified Architectural Theory: Chapter 5, Dessau Bauhaus / Walter Gropius. "We read with alarm about Bauhaus images and practices introduced into the architectural education of developing countries. The press announces these as “progressive” moves, little realizing what danger that poses to that country’s tradition". Image © Thomas Lewandovski
Dessau Bauhaus / Walter Gropius. "We read with alarm about Bauhaus images and practices introduced into the architectural education of developing countries. The press announces these as “progressive” moves, little realizing what danger that poses to that country’s tradition". Image © Thomas Lewandovski

We will be publishing Nikos Salingaros’ book, Unified Architectural Theory, in a series of installments, making it digitally, freely available for students and architects around the world. The following chapter discusses our society’s phobia against natural, local forms - our “ecophobia” - and the need for the architecture discipline to counter this fear by adopting a more scientifically-rigorous, intellectual structure. If you missed them, make sure to read the previous installments here.

The 21st century has begun with a continuation, and perhaps intensification, of the worst prejudices seen in the twentieth. Those prejudices include a disdain of traditional cultures, and all that links a human being to his/her local history. 

Similarly, most building and planning today follow unwritten rules that have no empirical foundation, being based strictly upon visual/ideological constructs from the early twentieth century. Contemporary design avoids any criterion of quality that draws upon evolved precedent and tradition from a prior era, and thinks that this refusal is a great virtue. In this way, architects and urbanists end up obeying simplistic criteria for design, rejecting any sense of beauty that links human beings with their land, tradition, and culture. 

The term “ecophobia” refers to an unreasonable but deeply conditioned reaction against natural forms. It has also been used in clinical psychology to denote a phobia against one’s dwelling, but that specific use now appears to be antiquated. However, we believe that these two terms “ecophobia” and “oikophobia” may in many cases be used interchangeably. (Linguistically, the common Greek root for “house” can be written either as ecos or oikos).