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Podcast

Can Future Cities be Timber Cities? Google’s Sidewalk Labs Asks the Experts

05:00 - 23 October, 2018
Can Future Cities be Timber Cities? Google’s Sidewalk Labs Asks the Experts, Courtesy of MGA. ImageMGA reenvisioned the Empire State Building in mass timber construction
Courtesy of MGA. ImageMGA reenvisioned the Empire State Building in mass timber construction

Steel and concrete facades have dominated contemporary cityscapes for generations, but as pressures from climate change pose new challenges for design and construction industries, some firms are turning to mass timber as the construction material of the future. But could it be used for structures as complex as skyscrapers? 

How To Invest in Your Online Presence to Help Grow Your Design Business

09:30 - 12 February, 2018
How To Invest in Your Online Presence to Help Grow Your Design Business, © Andrea Vasquez
© Andrea Vasquez

We live in a world that spends more time online than outside. And as architects and designers, we invest in creating a more engaging world by means of enhancing life through our buildings. However, through a perhaps unique form of tunnel vision, we are missing an incredible opportunity to leverage alternative mediums to impact more people through our design businesses.

Here are 5 ways to utilize your creativity to produce unique content that will help enhance your impact on the world of design, and in turn, push you and your design business forward:

The 7 Best Podcasts Hosted by Architects, for Architects

08:30 - 15 October, 2017
The 7 Best Podcasts Hosted by Architects, for Architects, © <a href='https://unsplash.com/photos/4fegNAjoAl4'>Jaz King</a> on <a href='https://unsplash.com/'>Unsplash</a>
© Jaz King on Unsplash

This article was originally published by The Architect's Guide as "The 7 Best Architecture Podcasts For Architects, Hosted By Architects."

As an avid podcast listener I thought I would put together a list of the best architecture podcasts that are also hosted by architects. I think it is helpful to get insight into the design and business side of architecture from someone who has been through the process personally.

So, in no particular order, here are my picks for the best architecture podcasts currently available.

In Conversation with 3 Rapidly Emerging Practices: L.E.FT, Point Supreme, and vPPR

10:30 - 21 June, 2017
Courtesy of Point Supreme. Image © GSAPP Conversations
Courtesy of Point Supreme. Image © GSAPP Conversations

In these three episodes of GSAPP Conversations, a podcast series designed to offer a window onto the expanding field of contemporary architectural practice, three globally-operating emerging practices are pressed and interviewed by students and staff from the New York-based school.

© GSAPP Conversations
© GSAPP Conversations

Courtesy of Point Supreme. Image © GSAPP Conversations Courtesy of L.E.FT Architects. Image © GSAPP Conversations Courtesy of VPPR. Image © GSAPP Conversations Courtesy of Point Supreme. Image © GSAPP Conversations + 16

11 Architecture, Design and Urbanism Podcasts to Start Listening to Now

07:15 - 5 April, 2017
11 Architecture, Design and Urbanism Podcasts to Start Listening to Now

It can sometimes feel as if the world is divided into two camps: those who do not listen to podcasts (probably because they don’t know what a podcast is) and those who listen to podcasts, love podcasts, and keep badgering their friends for recommendations so they can start listening to even more.

Unlike other media, it’s notoriously difficult to discover and share podcasts – even more so if you’re looking for a podcast on a niche subject like architecture, design or urbanism. To help you in your hour of need, Metropolis’ Vanessa Quirk (author of Guide to Podcasting) and ArchDaily’s James Taylor-Foster (whose silvery tones you may have heard on various architecture and design audio stories) have come together to compile this list of eleven podcasts you should subscribe to.

A Combination of Wonder and Structure: Christian Kerez on Swiss Architecture

07:00 - 24 March, 2017
A Combination of Wonder and Structure: Christian Kerez on Swiss Architecture

In this fourth episode of GSAPP Conversations, third-year GSAPP Master of Architecture student Ayesha Ghosh speaks with Swiss architect Christian Kerez, who delivered the opening lecture of the school's Spring 2017 Semester. Kerez's recent projects include Incidental Space at the Swiss Pavillion of the 2016 Venice Architecture Biennale, an amorphous structure which raised questions of the limits of imagination and technical feasibility in architecture today.

When Ivory Towers Were Black: Sharon Sutton on the Dual Fronts of Gender and Ethnicity

04:00 - 23 March, 2017
When Ivory Towers Were Black: Sharon Sutton on the Dual Fronts of Gender and Ethnicity

In this third episode of GSAPP Conversations, Columbia GSAPP Associate Professor Mabel O. Wilson speaks with Sharon Sutton about the publication of her new book, When Ivory Towers Were Black, which tells the story of how an unparalleled cohort of ethnic minority students earned degrees from Columbia University’s School of Architecture (GSAPP) during a time of fierce struggles to open the ivory tower to ethnic minority students.

Juan Herreros on Spanish Architecture and Starting a Small Practice

04:00 - 21 March, 2017
Juan Herreros on Spanish Architecture and Starting a Small Practice

In this second episode of GSAPP Conversations, Amale Andraos speaks with Spanish architect and GSAPP Professor Juan Herreros about the relationship between teaching and practicing architecture, and how he has carefully designed a particular way of working globally. Herreros, who co-founded Abalos&Herreros in 1984 and currently leads estudio Herreros, offers insight into how working sensitively in foreign settings also helps to develop a robust local practice, and how he is bringing new models of emerging practices to his students in GSAPP’s Advanced Architecture Studios.

Introducing GSAPP Conversations' Inaugural Episode: "Exhibition Models"

09:30 - 24 February, 2017
Introducing GSAPP Conversations' Inaugural Episode: "Exhibition Models"

We are pleased to announce a new content partnership between ArchDaily and Columbia University's Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation (GSAPP) in New York City.

GSAPP Conversations is a podcast series designed to offer a window onto the expanding field of contemporary architectural practice. Each episode pivots around discussions on current projects, research, and obsessions of a diverse group of invited guests at Columbia, from both emerging and well-established practices. Usually hosted by the Dean of the GSAPP, Amale Andraos, the conversations also feature the school’s influential faculty and alumni and give students the opportunity to engage architects on issues of concern to the next generation.

6 Practices Recognized as Social Design Innovators by Curry Stone Design Prize

12:30 - 3 January, 2017
6 Practices Recognized as Social Design Innovators by Curry Stone Design Prize, © José Bastidas / Pico Collective Courtesy of Curry Stone Design Prize. ImageCustomized size and shape basketball court. La Ye 5 de Julio, Petare, Caracas
© José Bastidas / Pico Collective Courtesy of Curry Stone Design Prize. ImageCustomized size and shape basketball court. La Ye 5 de Julio, Petare, Caracas

In the past 10 years, the Curry Stone Design Prize has grown to become one of the world’s preeminent awards honoring socially impactful design professionals and the influence of design as a force for improving lives and strengthening communities.

This year, in honor of the prize’s 10th anniversary, the Curry Stone Foundation will acknowledge the largest group of influential practices yet, recognizing 100 firms over the next twelve months as members of the “Social Design Circle.” Each firm will be profiled on the award website, as well as participate in the foundation’s new podcast, Social Design Insights, beginning on January 5th, 2017.

99% Invisible Tackles McMansions and the Architecture of Evil

16:00 - 18 December, 2016
99% Invisible Tackles McMansions and the Architecture of Evil

Architecture critic Kate Wagner has collaborated with 99% invisible on a podcast and a guest column delving into the tragedies of McMansions and the representation of evil through architecture in film, respectively.

In the podcast, Wagner, who is the author of McMansion Hell, is interviewed by Roman Mars and explains how the McMansion typology evolved, as well as how it became so despised, delving into topics of architectural history and representations of wealth.

Through her article as a guest columnist, Wagner explores the real-world buildings used in film to depict the evil corporation archetype in movies like Robocop, Blade Runner, and The Matrix.

99% Invisible Discusses How Algae Biotechnology Can Affect the Urban Environment

12:00 - 17 December, 2016
99% Invisible Discusses How Algae Biotechnology Can Affect the Urban Environment, © BIQ via GOOD
© BIQ via GOOD

In a recent article for 99% Invisible, Kurt Kohlstedt explores how integrating microalgae into buildings can create a dualistic system of living and built, in order to perform services like create shade, generate power, and work with HVAC systems to modulate interior environments.

Projects that utilize such technology include bioreactors that produce oxygen and bio-fuel, a building with a bio-adaptive façade, and a street lamp that filters carbon dioxide from the urban environment.

"Night White Skies" Podcast Explores How the Design of Our Environment and Our Bodies is Changing Architecture

09:30 - 19 November, 2016
"Night White Skies" Podcast Explores How the Design of Our Environment and Our Bodies is Changing Architecture, Courtesy of Sean Lally
Courtesy of Sean Lally

Humanity is at a key moment in a larger story, one in which we are willfully manipulating both our global environments as well as our human bodies. The first is changing the makeup of the physical spaces we occupy and the second, the very body that perceives that space. At this intersection are the physical boundaries that define architectural space. Both our environments and our bodies are therefore open for design, and architecture has swerved in a new direction.

Created in response to these changes is a new podcast, “Night White Skies” w/ Sean Lally: A podcast about architecture's future, as both earth's environment & our human bodies are open for design. The podcast is about conversations with designers, engineers, and writers on the periphery of the architecture discipline, engaging in these developments from multiple fronts. Though the lens of discussion is architecture, it is necessary to engage a diverse range of perspectives to get a better picture of the events currently unfolding. This includes philosophers, cultural anthropologists, policy makers, scientists as well as authors of science fiction. Each individual’s work intersects this core topic, but from unique angles.

Monocle 24 Reports From the 2016 Oslo Architecture Triennale, After Belonging

04:00 - 21 September, 2016
Monocle 24 Reports From the 2016 Oslo Architecture Triennale, After Belonging, After Belonging – 2016 Oslo Architecture Triennale. Image © David Jiménez Iniesta, Ma Ángeles Peñalver Izaguirre, Javier Jiménez Iniesta (Studio Animal)
After Belonging – 2016 Oslo Architecture Triennale. Image © David Jiménez Iniesta, Ma Ángeles Peñalver Izaguirre, Javier Jiménez Iniesta (Studio Animal)

In the latest edition of Section D, Monocle 24's weekly review of design, architecture and craft, Henry Rees-Sheridan visits Oslo to speak to Hanna Dencik Petersson, Director of the 2016 Oslo Architecture Triennale, and Alejandra Navarrete Llopis and Ignacio González Galán – two members of its curatorial team, the After Belonging Agency. The show explores the concept behind the exhibitions of the Triennale, what it means to be located in Norway's capital, and how the event's trajectory is both a symptom and cause of Oslo’s development as a design city. ArchDaily's James Taylor-Foster weighs in on After Belonging's significance.

Never-before-heard Audio Gives us Insight to the Creativity of Prominent Architects and Reveals Forgotten Bauhaus Secrets

12:00 - 3 September, 2016
Never-before-heard Audio Gives us Insight to the Creativity of Prominent Architects and Reveals Forgotten Bauhaus Secrets, via 99% Invisible. Image Courtesy of f Institute of Personality and Social Research, University of California, Berkeley / The Monacelli Press
via 99% Invisible. Image Courtesy of f Institute of Personality and Social Research, University of California, Berkeley / The Monacelli Press

In two intriguing new podcasts, the team over at 99% Invisible uncovered some never-before-heard audio and forgotten secrets about elements of architectural history. In the first, The Mind of an Architect, producer Avery Trufelman explores the audio archives of the Institute of Personality Assessment and Research (IPAR), where a study undertaken in the late 1950s mapped the personalities of prominent architects. Eero Saarinen, Philip Johnson, and Richard Neutra were among the study group, and the data came to some interesting conclusions about the role of ego and the presence of creativity.

In the second, Photo Credit; The Negatives of the Bauhaus Sam Greenspan explores the misattribution of credit for some of the most prolific images of the Bauhaus. Taken in the 1930s by German photographer Lucia Moholy, the historic images paint one of the clearest pictures of life at the Bauhaus. In the turmoil of the war, her negatives were lost, and absorbed by the school's collection, denying her the credit she deserved.

Standing Out or Fitting In? How Do Architects Approach Their Context

08:00 - 1 August, 2016
Standing Out or Fitting In? How Do Architects Approach Their Context, The Royal Ontario Museum extension by Daniel Libeskind, image by The City of Toronto. Image via 99% Invisible
The Royal Ontario Museum extension by Daniel Libeskind, image by The City of Toronto. Image via 99% Invisible

All architects desire recognition of their built work; for their signature design style to be identified, or for the quality of materials and details to outshine those around it. Unfortunately, if every new architectural structure was to insert itself into its context looking to be the star, soon it would become impossible to gauge the civic relevance of the area. Some buildings, such as Daniel Libeskind's Jewish Museum, appear dislocated with due cause, but others stand out for the sake of standing out, turning their back on their rich historical setting.

While there can be no singular strategy for contextual integration, Kurt Kohlstedt argues that a consideration of historical context, whether eventually chosen to acquiesce with or deny, will result in richer and more engaging built environment. In his latest essay for 99% Invisible, Kohlstedt unpacks the myriad ways in which a new building can engage with what was there before, highlighting examples which successfully and unsuccessfully take up the challenge. He acknowledges the difficulty of finding the sweet spot, as many designs are unable to navigate the "fine line between contextual and contemporary."