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Im Pei: The Latest Architecture and News

How Painter Ben Johnson Takes Architectural Representation to Incredible Levels of Realism

04:00 - 8 December, 2015
How Painter Ben Johnson Takes Architectural Representation to Incredible Levels of Realism, 'Approaching the Mirador' (2013, acrylic on canvas, 89 x 59in / 225 x 150cm). Image © Ben Johnson
'Approaching the Mirador' (2013, acrylic on canvas, 89 x 59in / 225 x 150cm). Image © Ben Johnson

Ben Johnson is a painter preoccupied by realism – especially when it comes to the two-dimensional representation of architectural space. A British artist practicing in London, Johnson has been working professionally since the mid-1960s. In that time his extensive œuvre has encompassed painted cityscapes and prints to depictions of rooms designed—among others—by Norman Foster, John Pawson, I. M. Pei, and David Chipperfield.

'Room of the Niobids II' (2011, acrylic on canvas, 71 x 99in / 180 x 252cm): depiction of the Neues Museum (Berlin) by David Chipperfield Architects & Julian Harrap. Image © Ben Johnson 'Fatherland Room' (2014, acrylic on canvas, 71 x 93in / 180 x 237cm): depiction of the Neues Museum (Berlin) by David Chipperfield Architects & Julian Harrap. Image © Ben Johnson 'Roman Room' (2014, acrylic on canvas, 71 x 93in / 180 x 237cm): depiction of the Neues Museum (Berlin) by David Chipperfield Architects & Julian Harrap. Image © Ben Johnson 'Room of the Niobids' (2011, acrylic on canvas, 71 x 99in / 180 x 252cm): depiction of the Neues Museum (Berlin) by David Chipperfield Architects & Julian Harrap. Image © Ben Johnson + 19

25 Architects You Should Know

16:00 - 18 July, 2015
25 Architects You Should Know, © Flickr CC user victortsu
© Flickr CC user victortsu

As an unavoidable art form, “architecture is one of humanity’s most visible and long-lasting forms of expression,” writes Complex Media. Within the past 150 years—the period of modern architecture—a distinct form of artistry has developed, significantly changing the way we look at the urban environments around us. To highlight some of the key figures in architecture over the past 150 years, Complex Media has created a list of “25 Architects You Should Know,” covering a range of icons including Zaha HadidIeoh Ming PeiPhilip JohnsonOscar NeimeyerSOMDaniel Libeskind, and more. Read the full list to learn more about each iconic architect, here.

Like Father, Like Son: 4 Famous Architecture Dynasties

08:00 - 21 June, 2015
Like Father, Like Son: 4 Famous Architecture Dynasties, Gateway Arch / Eero Saarinen. Image Courtesy of Flickr CC Jefferson National Expansion Memorial, NPS https://www.flickr.com/photos/jeffnps/
Gateway Arch / Eero Saarinen. Image Courtesy of Flickr CC Jefferson National Expansion Memorial, NPS https://www.flickr.com/photos/jeffnps/

While Eliel and Eero Saarinen may be the most well known father-son architect duo, they are certainly not the only pair to have left their mark in the field. As far back as the 1700s, the Gabriel father and son dynasty (Jacques V and Ange-Jacques) constructed much of Versailles, and more recently both I.M. Pei and Lewis Davis have passed their legacy onto their sons. In honor of Father's Day, we look at four father-son architecture dynasties and their lasting influence on the profession, after the break.

Celebrate Presidents Day with Five Presidential Libraries

00:00 - 16 February, 2015
Celebrate Presidents Day with Five Presidential Libraries, Courtesy of Daniel Cooper - http://www.flickr.com/photos/doitintheroad/
Courtesy of Daniel Cooper - http://www.flickr.com/photos/doitintheroad/

President’s day marks a moment of reflection in the United States, where citizens acknowledge the contributions of US presidents to the politics and culture of the nation. While some of these men are still with us, the majority are represented only by the monuments and buildings they left to posterity. Indeed, the legacy of a United States President has come to be embodied in a very specific type of building—a library. The last 13 presidents have commissioned national libraries to be built in their name, marking the end of their service. Libraries have also been posthumously dedicated to presidents who did not erect such monuments during their own lifetimes. In either case, recording the lives and legacies of these great men has made for some fantastic architecture. See some of our favorites, after the break!

6 Modern Pyramids that Show Timeless Geometry is Here to Stay

01:00 - 17 January, 2015
6 Modern Pyramids that Show Timeless Geometry is Here to Stay, The Louvre Pyramid / I.M. Pei. Image © Greg Kristo
The Louvre Pyramid / I.M. Pei. Image © Greg Kristo

If you were a Greek tourist in the 1st century BCE you would likely have had something in your hand that would be quite familiar here in the 21st century. A guide book. The most popular guide book of the Hellenic world listed seven wonders of the world that should be visited by any Greek traveler.

Of those seven wonders, six no longer exist. The Colossus of Rhodes, the Lighthouse of Alexandria, and the Mausoleum at Halicarnassus were lost to natural causes, the Temple of Artemis and Statue of Zues destroyed by human hands, and no one knows what happened to the Hanging Gardens. The remaining wonder is the Great Pyramid of Giza. This colossal Egyptian structure is so grand a work that even today, 4,500 years after its construction, it is still considered by some to be the most impressive civil engineering project in history, beating out feats like the Panama Canal, the Hoover Dam, and the Golden Gate Bridge.

The pyramid isn’t just an ancient wonder. Just as the Great Pyramid has managed to survive into modern times, so has our love affair with the simple but powerful angled shape. Modern architects and engineers continue to build pyramids. These modern pyramids may not be stone tombs to ancient pharaohs, but are no less stunning for all that. Read on after the break for six examples.

The Pyramid House / Juan Carlos Ramos. Image Courtesy of Juan Carlos Ramos Olbrich's Bolz Conservatory / Stuart  Gallaher. Image Courtesy of Wikimedia user Chief-O (public domain) The Walter Pyramid / Don Gibbs. Image © Flickr CC user Cyrus II The Palace of Peace and Reconciliation / Foster + Partners. Image © Flickr CC user Ken and Nyetta + 16

IM Pei Wins UIA Gold Medal for Lifetime Achievement

00:00 - 9 June, 2014
IM Pei Wins UIA Gold Medal for Lifetime Achievement, Courtesy of http://blog.newx.com/
Courtesy of http://blog.newx.com/

The International Union of Architects (UIA) has announced that it will award its Gold Medal to the Chinese born American architect and 1983 Pritzker Laureate, Ieoh Ming Pei.

By bestowing the most prestigious of the UIA's awards on Pei, whose “life and work spans the history of modern architecture over five continents for more than sixty years," the UIA recognizes "his unique style, his timeless rigor, and his spiritual connection to history, time and space.”

Pei will receive the UIA Gold Medal at the awards ceremony at the UIA World Congress of Architecture in Durban, South Africa on August 6th 2014.

© Pei Cobb Freed & Partners © Flickr: username- Andy961 © Anonymous Blogger Courtesy of Daniel Cooper - http://www.flickr.com/photos/doitintheroad/ + 5

Fourth Annual Leonore and Walter Annenberg Award for Diplomacy through the Arts Presented to I.M. Pei

04:00 - 18 May, 2012
© Laurie Lambrecht
© Laurie Lambrecht

The Foundation for Art and Preservation in Embassies (FAPE) recently announced that it will honor architect I.M. Pei with the fourth annual Leonore and Walter Annenberg Award for Diplomacy through the Arts. The award will be presented at a dinner at the U.S. Department of State’s Diplomatic Reception Rooms today, May 15, 2012. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton will host FAPE’s members at the event, and FAPE Chairman Jo Carole Lauder, will present the award to Mr. Pei. The award was established to recognize American individuals who have demonstrated long-term excellence and creative innovation, and recent past honorees include: Agnes Gund, and Mayor of New York City, Michael Bloomberg. More information on the award after the break.

Trees of the Architects

15:00 - 25 December, 2011
Via The All Nighter
Via The All Nighter

We found this great image from The All Nighter – a tumblr dedicated to students who want to share and prospective students who would like to know about the architecture studio experience. The ArchDaily team would like to wish you a wonderful holiday season and a happy new year!

Texas Society of Architects' 25-Year Award Presented to I. M. Pei & Partners' Fountain Place

13:00 - 14 August, 2011
© Andreas Praefcke / <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/'>Wikimedia</a> Commons
© Andreas Praefcke / Wikimedia Commons

Each year the Texas Society of Architects recognizes a building that was completed 25-50 years ago which they believe has “stood the test of time by retaining its central form, character, and overall architectural integrity”. This year, the prestigious honor is awarded to Fountain Place, designed by Henry Cobb of I. M. Pei & Partners and completed back in 1986 in Dallas, Texas.

Architecture City Guide: Berlin

10:00 - 27 July, 2011
Courtesy of Flickr CC License / alexthompson. Used under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/'>Creative Commons</a>
Courtesy of Flickr CC License / alexthompson. Used under Creative Commons

This week, with the help of our readers, our Architecture City Guide is headed to Berlin. The twentieth century changed nearly all cities, but perhaps none more so than Berlin. From its destruction in World War II that left few historic buildings intact to its division until 1989 that brought together the architecture of two competing ideologies into one city, Berlin’s modern and contemporary architecture speaks to a past that seldom accompanies such recent additions. The city is filled with new and wonderful architecture that might not have found space in other cities in Europe. With that in mind, we were unable feature all our readers’ suggestions on the first go around. We will be adding to the list in the near future, so please add more of your favorites in the comment section below. Once again, thanks to all our readers for your help.

The Architecture City Guide: Berlin list and corresponding map after the break.

Architecture City Guide: Paris

13:00 - 13 July, 2011
Courtesy of <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/'>Wikimedia</a> Commons / Benh Lieu Song
Courtesy of Wikimedia Commons / Benh Lieu Song

This week, with the help of our readers, our Architecture City Guide is headed to Paris. For centuries Paris has been the laboratory where innovative architects and artists have come to test their ideas. This has created a city that has bit of everything. Where the architecture of some cities seems to undergo phases of punctuated equilibrium, Paris’s architectural fossil record gives an impression of gradualism; all the missing links are there. This makes it easy to trace the origins of the most contemporary ideas throughout history. Nothing seems to come out of nowhere. If you look around you kind find the design’s inspiration running through the city’s Roman, Medieval, Renaissance, Baroque, Classical, Rocco, Neo-Classical, Empire, Art Nouveau, Art Deco, Modern, Post-Modern, and Contemporary Architecture. Seen in another context, many of Paris’s buildings might seem out of place, but the bones of this city support the newest iterations on the oldest and most profound questions. The 24 contemporary designs that comprise our list probably should not be viewed outside of this context, even though that is the stated goal of some of the designs.

As the most visited city in the world and arguably the capital of culture, it is impossible to capture the essence of Paris in 24 modern/contemporary designs. Our readers supplied us with great suggestions, and we really appreciate the help and use of their photographs. The list is far from complete and we realize that many iconic buildings are not yet on the list. We will be adding to it in the near feature, so please add more in the comments section below.

The Architecture City Guide: Paris list and corresponding map after the break.

Architecture City Guide: Columbus

13:00 - 1 June, 2011
Courtesy of Flickr CC License / sombraala. Used under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/'>Creative Commons</a>
Courtesy of Flickr CC License / sombraala. Used under Creative Commons

This week our Architecture City Guide is headed to Columbus; Indiana that is. We have already made the trip to Columbus, Ohio. This lesser known Columbus only has a population of 44,000 people, but for what it lacks in size it makes up in architecture. Columbus, perhaps, has more notable modern architecture buildings per capita than any city in the United States. In fact, it was much harder narrowing the list down to 12 projects than finding enough for the city guide. With the buildings not on the list, it will be impossible to please everyone. Notably our list doesn’t even include Romaldo Giurgola’s Columbus East High School, Cesar Pelli’s Commons Centre and Mall, and SOM’s Republic Newspaper Building. Take a look at the 12 on our list and add your favorites in the comment section below.

The Architecture City Guide: Columbus list and corresponding map after the break.

New Yorkers top Architectural Events of 2010

17:30 - 31 December, 2010
© Iwan Baan
© Iwan Baan

This years architectural events in New York are bound to have a meaningful effect on the years to come; the decision by NYU to add another tower complementing I.M Pei’s existing Silver Towers complex (rather than their initial plan to demolish them), the opening of the first section of Brooklyn Bridge Park coupled with the completion of the High Line has re-established New York City as a key model to reference when it comes to designing urban public space, and finally construction began on Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial, by Louis Kahn, to name a few.

From transportation, urban planning, exhibitions, residential and office buildings follow the break to see the New Yorkers list of some of the most influential decisions surrounding architecture over the past year in New York.

Architecture City Guide: New York City

08:57 - 22 December, 2010
© flickr: nickmilleruk. Used under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/'>Creative Commons</a>
© flickr: nickmilleruk. Used under Creative Commons

The Architecture City Guide series is back, this week featuring New York City. Grab a scarf and hat and hit the streets to check out some of the great architecture that NYC has to offer. Think we left something out? Add your can’t miss NYC buildings to our comments below.

Follow the break for our New York City list and a corresponding map!

I.M. Pei awarded with the RIBA Royal Gold Medal 2010

12:30 - 16 February, 2010

The RIBA Royal Gold Medal for 2010 goes to an architect whose renown has been built over several decades of consistently producing a very particular kind of structure — often aspired to, rarely achieved.