We are currently in Beta version and updating this search on a regular basis. We’d love to hear your feedback here.

  1. ArchDaily
  2. Crisis

Crisis: The Latest Architecture and News

How Private Equity Is Making the Housing Crisis Even Worse

This article was originally published on Common Edge.

America’s housing crisis is a longstanding problem. But recent reports of private hedge funds buying up detached houses and townhouses is likely to make an already difficult situation even worse. When hedge funds purchase such properties, those homes are not likely to come back on the real estate market. They are gone for now—and probably for the long term.

Closing Film - Shelter Without Shelter (World Premiere)

The Architecture Film Festival London, in its 2021 edition, addresses a variety of topics related to contemporary architecture. In particular, the role of housing—from the history of housing estates to the current global housing crisis—is a prominent theme.

Opening Film - PUSH(2019) + Guests and Q&A

The Architecture Film Festival London, in its 2021 edition, addresses a variety of topics related to contemporary architecture. In particular, the role of housing—from the history of housing estates to the current global housing crisis. Thus, this critical topic will provide the basis for the festival’s opening film, PUSH (2019), directed by Fredrik Gertten.

How Are Construction Materials Produced and How Does This Contribute to the Climate Crisis? Our Readers Answered

How does architecture contribute to the current climate crisis? 

We invited our readers to weigh in on this issue and were overwhelmed by the number of responses that we got. After reading through and compiling the replies from industry professionals, architectural students, and architecture aficionados, we were struck by a common theme: there are few resources when it comes to researching how materials and products used in construction are sourced and produced

Humankind: After Covid-19

( THE GLOBAL SCENARIO)

Our entire civilisation is facing one of our most challenging times since WWII.

​The results caused by the COVID-19 outbreak are unimaginable and unpredictable yet, but we are already feeling the drastic effects. Richard Kozul-Wright, Director of the UNCTAD, estimates an impact that will cost the world economy around $1 trillion, expecting the worst scenario than the financial collapse in 2008.

( CHALLENGE )

Propose a visionary project that helps to revive the economy of a region, city or community affected by the COVID-19 outbreak.

In a perfect harmony of architecture, economy, and environment, the competition aims to generate visionary ideas

Can Architecture Solve Our Crises?

It is not your responsibility to finish the work [of perfecting the world], but you are not free to desist from it either.” —Rabbi Tarfon

On a recent flight, a gentleman sitting next to me noticed, aloud, that I was reading a book about architecture. Daring to engage in a conversation with more than two hours of flight time left, I confessed that I not only read about, but also practice architecture. His next question, with the earnest tone of a newly minted grandfather, was whether architects were “solving the housing crisis.”

Architects and Our Right to Fail

The architecture world is a very different place compared to what it was ten years ago - a fact that is all too obvious for today's young architects, who bore the brunt of the financial crisis. But how can recent graduates harness such rapid change to make a positive impact? This article written by ArchDaily en Español's Nicolás Valencia explores the impact of the financial crisis on architecture in the Global South and in particular in the Spanish-speaking world, finding that it may be the inalienable right of the architect "to give yourself room to fail or to quit."

For some years now, three figures have been floating around that are worrisome to Chilean architects and architectural students: every year 48 architectural schools enroll 3,500 students and give degrees to another 1,400 in a completely saturated market. The future appears bleak, the professional internships are depressing, and among those who already have degrees, we're all too familiar with the exploitative offices that not only offer their employees zero contracts (or health insurance of any kind, all the while praying that nobody gets injured) but also make them work much more than they agreed to with paltry salaries and labor unions that have seen better days. Meanwhile at the universities, talking about money in studios, or about flesh and blood clients, has become a taboo subject. “Students, don't let money tarnish the beauty of the discipline” they tell you. Of course, not only does it not get tarnished, but we've gotten to the point where many don't even know how much to charge for a plan drawing, let alone for an actual project.