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Principal Tower / Foster + Partners

© Nigel Young / Foster + Partners © Nigel Young / Foster + Partners © Nigel Young / Foster + Partners © Nigel Young / Foster + Partners + 31

  • Architects: Foster + Partners
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area: 35400.0
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year: 2019

30 St Mary Axe Tower / Foster + Partners

© Nigel Young - Foster + Partners © Nigel Young - Foster + Partners © Nigel Young - Foster + Partners © Nigel Young - Foster + Partners + 35

  • Architects: Foster + Partners
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area: 64500.0
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year: 2003

Comcast Technology Centre / Foster + Partners

© Nigel Young / Foster + Partners
© Nigel Young / Foster + Partners

© Nigel Young / Foster + Partners © Nigel Young / Foster + Partners © Jeffrey Totaro © Nigel Young / Foster + Partners + 43

Philadelphia, United States
  • Architects: Foster + Partners
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area: 167225.0
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year: 2019

Spotlight: Norman Foster

Arguably the leading name of a generation of internationally high-profile British architects, Norman Foster (born 1 June 1935)—or to give him his full title Norman Robert Foster, Baron Foster of Thames Bank of Reddish, OM, HonFREng—gained recognition as early as the 1970s as a key architect in the high-tech movement, which continues to have a profound impact on architecture as we know it today.

Queen Alia International Airport. Image © Nigel Young / Foster + Partners The Gherkin . Image © Nigel Young Hearst Tower. Image © Chuck Choi Beijing Airport. Image © Foster + Partners + 46

22 of the World’s Greatest Architecture Projects Selected by Time Magazine

Time Magazine’s list of the World’s Greatest Places 2018 celebrates 100 destinations to visit, stay, eat, and drink from around the world. Chosen by Time’s global team of editors and correspondents, the contenders have been evaluated on quality, originality, innovation, sustainability, and influence.

The list features many architectural delights young and old, designed by famous architects past and present. Ranging from a treehouse in Sweden to a soaring art museum in South Africa, the projects are united by their architectural excellence, worthy of exploration by both architects and the general public.

Vatican Chapel / Foster + Partners

© Laurian Ghinitoiu © Nigel Young / Foster+Partners © Nigel Young / Foster+Partners © Laurian Ghinitoiu + 21

Venice, Italy

The Murray Hotel / Foster + Partners

© Nigel Young / Foster + Partners
© Nigel Young / Foster + Partners

© Nigel Young / Foster + Partners © Nigel Young / Foster + Partners © Nigel Young / Foster + Partners © Nigel Young / Foster + Partners + 37

Hong Kong, Hong Kong (SAR)
  • Architects: Foster + Partners
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area: 33750.0
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year: 2017

3Beirut / Foster + Partners

© Nigel Young / Foster + Partners © Nigel Young / Foster + Partners © Nigel Young / Foster + Partners © Nigel Young / Foster + Partners + 23

Bayrut, Lebanon
  • Architects: Foster + Partners
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area: 100000.0
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year: 2017

The Unexpected First Jobs of Seven Famous Architects

Seniority is infamously important in the field of architecture. Despite occasionally being on the butt end of wage jokes, the field can actually pay relatively well—assuming that you’ve been working for a couple of decades. Even Bjarke Ingels, the tech-savvy, video-producing, Netflix-documentary-starring provocateur and founder of the ultra-contemporary BIG isn’t a millennial; at 42 the Dane is a full nine years older than Mark Zuckerberg.

As a result of this, it's common to lead a rich and complex life before finding architectural fame, and many of the world’s most successful architects started their careers off in an entirely different field. If you haven't landed your dream job yet, you may find the following list of famous architects' first gigs reassuring.

The 16 Stories Behind the 2017 Building of the Year Award Winners

After two weeks of nominations and voting, last week we announced the 16 winners of the 2017 Building of the Year Awards. In addition to providing inspiration, information, and tools for architecture lovers from around the world, ArchDaily seeks to offer a platform for the many diverse and global voices in the architecture community. In this year's Building of the Year Awards that range of voices was once again on display, with 75,000 voters from around the world offering their selections to ultimately select 16 winners from over 3,000 published projects.

Behind each of those projects are years of research, design, and labor. In the spirit of the world's most democratic architecture award, we share the stories behind the 16 buildings that won over our global readership with their urban interventions, humanitarianism, playfulness, and grandeur.

CTBUH Names Winners of 2016 Tall Building Awards

The Council on Tall Building and Urban Habitat have announced the winners of the 15th edition of the CTBUH Tall Building Awards. From over 100 submissions, the best buildings from four regions – the Americas, Asia & Australasia, Europe and Middle East & Africa – were selected, along with recipients of the Urban Habitat Award, the Innovation Award, the Performance Award and the 10 Year Award. The CTBUH will pick a global winner from the regional selections later this year.

The towers were chosen by a panel of architects from world-renowned firms and were judged on every aspect of performance, looking in particular for “those that have the greatest positive impact on the individuals who use these buildings and the cities they inhabit.”

Read on for the list of winners.

Maggie's Cancer Centre Manchester / Foster + Partners

© Nigel Young / Foster + Partners © Nigel Young / Foster + Partners © Nigel Young / Foster + Partners © Nigel Young / Foster + Partners + 58

  • Architects: Foster + Partners
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area: 1922.0
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year: 2016

12 Projects that Explain Landscape Urbanism and How It's Changing the Face of Cities

In his new book Landscape as Urbanism, Charles Waldheim, the John E. Irving Professor and Chair of Landscape Architecture at Harvard University’s Graduate School of Design, argues that in order to understand the twenty-first century metropolis, “a traditional understanding of the city as an extrapolation of architectural models and metaphors is no longer viable given the prevalence of larger forces or flows. These include ruptures or breaks in architectonic logic of traditional urban form as compelled by ecological, infrastructural, or economic change.”

In other words, spatial constructions in urban environments should no longer be attached to intractable functions or intent on isolation, but should instead integrate into the fabric of the city. These types of projects must be flexible to the inevitable changes in functionality and purpose that are byproducts of economic change and evolutions in land-use intentions. The dozen projects featured here are exemplary of such practices, both in how they adapt to past interventions and in how they move beyond the notion of a static future for urban conditions that are perpetually in flux.

Chateau Margaux Winery / Foster + Partners

© Nigel Young / Foster + Partners © Nigel Young / Foster + Partners © Nigel Young / Foster + Partners © Nigel Young / Foster + Partners + 29

Margaux, France

For the Highest Density of Design Excellence, Visit Dallas

Since the construction of the first high-rise, it seems architectural merit has been weighed most heavily by a building's height. However, Kriston Capps of CityLab notes in his article "For the Best U.S. Architecture Per Square Mile, Head to Dallas" that the concentration of buildings by award-winning and internationally-renowned architects can also put cities on the architectural map. Although Chicago and New York may have taller skylines, he argues, in terms of stellar design density, Dallas can't be beat. Read the full article, here.

Foster + Partners Remain World’s “Most Admired Architect”

A global survey conducted by BD has deemed Foster + Partners to be world’s “most admired architect" for the ninth consecutive year. The London-based practice, led by Norman Foster, is the 16th largest practice in the world. Foster + Partners’ ranking was undeniable, as the survey revealed a significant seven percent lead over runner-up contender, Herzog & de Meuron.

“To be voted most admired practice by our peers is a great honor,” said Norman Foster. “It is a huge tribute to our talented and hard-working teams with their myriad skills and disciplines, both in our many studios around the world and our base in London, all working towards the common goal of bringing innovative design solutions to create a better built environment.”

See who else topped the list as the world’s “most admired,” after the break.

Norman Foster's Interview with The European: “Architecture is the Expression of Values”

Berlin-based editor Max Tholl of The European Magazine has shared with us his interview with Norman Foster on the role of architecture in today’s society.

The European: Lord Foster, architects design buildings that will characterize cities for decades or even centuries to come. How difficult is it to design buildings for an unknown future?

Foster: Flexibility is a key consideration. We design with an awareness that circumstances will change – that a building’s context will evolve; it may be used in different ways and will need to incorporate new technologies that we cannot yet predict.

The complete interview, after the break. 

Abu Dhabi Central Market / Foster + Partners

© Nigel Young / Foster + Partners © Nigel Young / Foster + Partners © Nigel Young / Foster + Partners © Nigel Young / Foster + Partners + 32

  • Architects: Foster + Partners
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area: 689416.0
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year: 2014