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A Simple Guide to Using the ADA Standards for Accessible Design Guidelines

09:30 - 6 June, 2017
A Simple Guide to Using the ADA Standards for Accessible Design Guidelines, Obstructed high forward reach. Image Courtesy of United States Department of Justice
Obstructed high forward reach. Image Courtesy of United States Department of Justice

Only a special few architects can truly say they enjoy reading building codes. There’s no doubt that it’s daunting and it can certainly pose challenges to your design. Over time you’ll likely become familiar with the types of things you need to look out for on a project, but even the most experienced architects may still need to double-check a code question or two during the design process (or have an intern check it for them.) Unfortunately, many code documents are unwieldy to say the least, and there are few cases in which this is more true than the 279-page ADA Standards for Accessible Design. However, once you understand the layout and how to use a code book or the ADA guidelines, they become more manageable.

This guide aims to describe each chapter in the ADA 2010 guidelines to give a foundation for navigating them. Luckily for designers in United States, the documentation for the ADA Standards for Accessible Design is available online. Keep reading for a quick summary (all information and diagrams are directly from the guidelines). Check out the whole document here if you need it—or for convenience, each subheading in this article links directly to the relevant section in the PDF!

Golf facility standards. Image Courtesy of United States Department of Justice Accessible route clear width. Image Courtesy of United States Department of Justice Required door clearances. Image Courtesy of United States Department of Justice Signage standards. Image Courtesy of United States Department of Justice +16

A Triangulated Ramp Made For People With Reduced Mobility In Mind

08:00 - 12 May, 2017
A Triangulated Ramp Made For People With Reduced Mobility In Mind, © Micael Löfgren
© Micael Löfgren

© Micael Löfgren © Micael Löfgren © Micael Löfgren © Micael Löfgren +27

The geometric design from Lab for Planning and Architecture for the Municipality of Las Palmas de Gran Canaria in Spain is a morphological response that conditions Julio Navarro's and Roque Díaz's swimming pools allowing adequate movement of people with reduced mobility.

The project is a path of stairs and ramps with a triangular design that integrates with the surrounding landscape; the materiality and the constructive details are adapted to the different needs and natural conditions of the land. 

Michael Graves on Hospital Room Design

13:00 - 27 December, 2011

Michael Graves