We’ve built you a better ArchDaily. Learn more and let us know what you think. Send us your feedback »

Kangaroo Hotel / APOLLO Architects & Associates

  • Architects: APOLLO Architects & Associates
  • Location: Nihondutumi Taito, Tokyo, Japan
  • Architecture: Satoshi Kurosaki/APOLLOArchitects & Associates
  • Structure Engineers: Kenta Masaki
  • Facility Engineers: Kazuyoshi Takei
  • Structure: RC
  • Construction: Maekawa Constructions
  • Total Floor Area: 260.91 sqm (83.49 sqm/1F, 36.05 sqm/2F, 86.05 sqm/3F, 5.32 sqm/PH)
  • Area: 260.0 sqm
  • Project Year: 2009
  • Photographs: Masao Nishikawa

© Masao Nishikawa © Masao Nishikawa © Masao Nishikawa © Masao Nishikawa

Intermediating Patterns Exhibition

From the Kengo Kuma Lab in the University of Tokyo, we received this video showing an architecture related exhibition on intermediate space and experimental architecture inspired by Japanese traditional patterns that we recently exhibited in Tokyo, curated by Kengo Kuma, Matteo Belfiore, and Salvator-John A. Liotta, which is part of two exhibitions and a series of symposia organized by The Italian Cultural Center of Tokyo in concomitance with the UIA International Congress of Architecture.

Some more images after the break.

Exhibit in Tokyo: Architectural Environments for Tomorrow: New Spatial Practices in Architecture and Art

Haruka Kojin, Contact Lens; Photo © DAICI ANO
Haruka Kojin, Contact Lens; Photo © DAICI ANO

The computerization and urbanization of the 21st century is creating new lifestyles and forms of public space. Architectural Environments for Tomorrow presents the spatial experiments of 23 architects and artists from around the world responding to the transformation of their surroundings. “The metaphors of the world-views suggested by the artists resonate with the practical proposals of the architects, presenting images of future humanity from a variety of different angles.” Architects featured include Toyo Ito, Frank O. Gehry, Sou Fujimoto and many more. Continue reading for a complete list of the participants and more information on the exhibit.

AMID.cero9, The Golden Dome; Photo © DAICI ANO Selgascano, OURShELVES; Photo © DAICI ANO The Ministry of Culture of The Kingdom of Bahrain, Reclaim; Photo © DAICI ANO Kazuyo Sejima + Ryue Nishizawa / SANAA Rolex learning center EPFL; Photo © DAICI ANO

C-Lab 2005-2011 Exhibition

The work of C-Lab, Columbia University’s experimental urban and architecture think tank, is on display in Tokyo. Conceived as a temporary occupation, the exhibition presents C-Lab’s work alongside magazines from Yoshioka Library’s archive of international architecture journals from the 1960s to today. Images of C-Lab analyses, planning projects, installations, and publications are positioned on the gallery’s shelves next to vintage issues of A+U, Japan Architect, Shinkenchiku, Space, Architectural Review, Domus, Abitare, and Casabella. More information on the exhibition after the break.

House with Futokoro / Mizuishi Architects Atelier

  • Architects: Mizuishi Architects Atelier
  • Location: Tokyo, Japan
  • Architects: Mizuishi Architects Atelier / Kota Mizuishi
  • Structural Engineer: Kentaro Nagasaka
  • Lighting Designer: Yasuo Tsunoda
  • Contractor: Kraft Home
  • Area: 108.0 sqm
  • Project Year: 2011
  • Photographs: Courtesy of mizuishi architects atelier

Courtesy of  mizuishi architects atelier Courtesy of  mizuishi architects atelier Courtesy of  mizuishi architects atelier Courtesy of  mizuishi architects atelier

Sky Garden House / Keiji Ashizawa Design

  • Architects: Keiji Ashizawa Design
  • Location: Tokyo, Japan
  • Architects: Keiji Ashizawa Design / Keiji Ashizawa, Mriko Irie
  • Structural Engineer: ÅFASA Akira Suzuki
  • Landscape Design: GLAC Corporation
  • Furniture Design: DRILL DESIGN / Keiji Ashizawa
  • Building Construction: Heisei Construction Co., Ltd.
  • Project Year: 2010
  • Photographs: Daici Ano

© Daici Ano © Daici Ano © Daici Ano © Daici Ano

Mishima House / Keiji Ashizawa Design

  • Architects: Keiji Ashizawa Design
  • Location: Tokyo, Japan
  • Architects: Keiji Ashizawa Design
  • Project Architects: Keiji Ashizawa, Chino YamaguchiÅ
  • Structural Engineer: ÅFASA Akira Suzuki
  • Project Year: 2010
  • Photographs: Daici Ano

© Daici Ano © Daici Ano © Daici Ano © Daici Ano

HA Tower / Frontoffice + François Blanciak Architect

Courtesy of Frontoffice + François Blanciak Architect
Courtesy of Frontoffice + François Blanciak Architect

The HA tower, designed by Frontoffice + François Blanciak Architect, proposes a hybrid model for urban life that embraces the city, pulling it in the heart of the units, while still offering large open spaces that otherwise are only available on the urban fringe. Located in Higashi-Azabu, within walking distance of a cluster of rail lines, Shiba Park, and the iconic Tokyo Tower, the corner site is small, covering only 130 square meters and is constrained by a floor area ratio that limits construction to 8 floors. More images and architects’ description after the break.

2 Courts House / Keiji Ashizawa Design

  • Architects: Keiji Ashizawa Design
  • Location: Tokyo, Japan
  • Architects: Keiji Ashizawa Design
  • Project Architect: Keiji Ashizawa / Naoki Sekikawa
  • Structure Engineer: ASA asociates / Akira Suzuki
  • Project Year: 2008
  • Photographs: Daici Ano

© Daici Ano © Daici Ano © Daici Ano © Daici Ano

Long Slow Distance / Upsetter Architects

  • Architects: Upsetter Architects
  • Location: Tokyo, Japan
  • Architects: Upsetter Architects
  • Area: 33.4 sqm
  • Project Year: 2011
  • Photographs: Yusuke Wakabayashi

© Yusuke Wakabayashi © Yusuke Wakabayashi © Yusuke Wakabayashi © Yusuke Wakabayashi

House in Kohoku / Torafu

  • Architects: Torafu
  • Location: Tokyo, Japan
  • Architects: Torafu
  • Building Site: Yokohama Kanagawa
  • Structure: RC
  • Site Area: 230 m2
  • Area: 67.35 sqm
  • Project Year: 2008
  • Photographs: Daici Ano

© Daici Ano © Daici Ano © Daici Ano © Daici Ano

Architecture City Guide: Tokyo

Courtesy of Wikimedia Creative Commons / Morio
Courtesy of Wikimedia Creative Commons / Morio

This week, with the help of our readers, our Architecture City Guide is headed to Tokyo. Similar to Berlin, Tokyo’s architecture is overwhelming modern due its destruction during the 20th Century. We put together a list of 12 modern/contemporary buildings that we feel provides a good starting point. It is far from complete. There are dozens of other great buildings that are not our list, and we are looking to add to the list in the near future. Please add your favorites in the comment section below so we can add them on the second go around. Again thank you to all our readers who sent in their suggestions and photographs. The city guides would not be possible without your help.

To check out other cities visit our world map or our Architecture City Guide page. The Architecture City Guide: Tokyo list and corresponding map after the break.

Help us with our Architecture City Guide: Tokyo

Courtesy of Flickr CC License / localjapantimes
Courtesy of Flickr CC License / localjapantimes

Next week we will be taking our Architecture City Guide to Tokyo and we need your help. To make the City Guides more engaging we are asking for your input on which designs should comprise our weekly list of 12. In order for this to work we will need you, our readers, to suggest a few of your favorite modern/contemporary buildings for the upcoming city guide in the comment section below. Along with your suggestions we ask that you provide a link to an image you took of the building that we can use, the address of the building, and the architect. (The image must be from a site that has a Creative Common License cache like Flickr or Wikimedia. We cannot use images that are copyrighted unless they are yours and you give us permission.) From that we will select the top 12 most recommended buildings. Hopefully this method will help bring to our attention smaller well done projects that only locals truly know. With that in mind we do not showcase private single-family residences for obvious reasons. Additionally, we try to only show completed projects. This week we are headed to Tokyo. Example of the information we need for your suggestion: Architect: Kisho Kurokawa Location: 35°39′56.20″N 139°45′48.20″E ww.flickr.com/photos/localjapantimes/4594773378/sizes/l/in/photostream/ Photographer: localjapantimes

AD Classics: Makuhari Messe / Fumihiko Maki